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Chris
07-24-2005, 20:46
My name is Chris, and I am a southpaw (lefty). I would like to know how many Quiet Professionals are also left handed. How this has hindered or abled you in any way? Whether being ambidextrous or living in a right-hand world has ever been a challenge.

Thanks for reading,

-Chris

lksteve
07-24-2005, 22:10
i am left-handed, although i throw right handed (Dad wanted me to be a middle infielder and refused to let me throw left handed)...i shoot left-handed, actually throw grenades with either hand and in many respects became ambidextrous out of necessity...

did i struggle with left-handedness....? all my life...weapons school was not as much fun during the mechanical training portion..."Take the upper receiver in your right hand..." alot of the instruction seemed counter intuitive to me...the magazine slide on a 1911 requires use of the right hand...but i adapted...i can do most things i needed to do in SF with either hand...

the only time i was really self-conscious about being left-handed was in the Middle East...there are certain taboos regarding using the left hand that made life uncomfortable...i used to sit on my left hand during meals, as it is a no-no to touch food on a communal plate with your left hand...i used to chuckle to myself about that...

i tend to compartmentalize...when i am surveying, i expect the knobs that operate the instrument to be on the right side...that's how they are built...i've never known a left handed survey instrument and probably couldn't operate one if i had to ...i use my left eye, so there's not much problem there...scissors...i haven't mastered scissors or tin snips yet...a circular saw or sabre saw is problematic...i try using them right handed, but the term wood butcher has my name all over it...never the less, there are alot of things that are designed for use with the right hand that i have never thought about because that's how it's always been...

The Reaper
07-24-2005, 22:19
...the magazine slide on a 1911 requires use of the right hand...but i adapted...


lksteve:

If you are referring to the magazine release, most left-handed shooters manipulate it with their index finger, some faster than right-handed people can with their thumbs.

TR

lksteve
07-24-2005, 22:22
If you are referring to the magazine release, most left-handed shooters manipulate it with their index finger, some faster than right-handed people can with their thumbs.true...and i learned that probably seven years after being issued an M79/1911 as a grenadier in the 82nd...before that, i used my left index finger in a less-than-efficient manner...once being taught that i was allowed to use my right hand ( i am not joking about this), i found it was more efficient...when firing right handed, using the thumb seem awkward...

Doc
07-26-2005, 20:53
I'm left handed and I adapted like every other south paw that came into the military. It becomes second natured after a few thousand muscle memory drills.

You can do it!

Doc

Peregrino
07-26-2005, 21:19
I'm left handed and I adapted like every other south paw that came into the military. It becomes second natured after a few thousand muscle memory drills.

You can do it!

Doc

That's it in a nutshell. Handedness is an overblown issue (except that we are inately superior because of our ability to adapt to the prejudices and outright discrimination of a right-handed world). Though it does come in handy clearing to the right around corners. :D Peregrino

Huey14
07-26-2005, 22:05
Does the US Mil issue many of the lefty M16 series? I've seen a picture of an SF soldier with one, but it's the only picture I've ever seen of a lefty M4.

lksteve
07-26-2005, 22:09
Does the US Mil issue many of the lefty M16 series? I've seen a picture of an SF soldier with one, but it's the only picture I've ever seen of a lefty M4.i've never seen a lefty M16...i'd bet the photograph was reversed...

Huey14
07-26-2005, 22:24
It could well have been. I'm not certain to be honest.

I've heard of some guys here and in the Aus army who have found the Styer to be a bitawkward with the charging handle. I think you can move the ejection port over to the other side, but not the CH.

The Reaper
07-26-2005, 22:37
i've never seen a lefty M16...i'd bet the photograph was reversed...

Same here. I agree, bad photo most likely.

TR

Peregrino
07-27-2005, 08:28
It could well have been. I'm not certain to be honest.

I've heard of some guys here and in the Aus army who have found the Styer to be a bitawkward with the charging handle. I think you can move the ejection port over to the other side, but not the CH.

Yes, the Steyr can be swapped. Worked with the Ecuadoran Army in the mid-80's when they had it. They couldn't wait to get their hands on the M-16 and I didn't blame them. Never did understand the gun writer's fascination with that weapon. Stag Arms makes the only true left handed AR I'm aware of. Personally, I don't see the point. FWIW - Peregrino

Huey14
07-27-2005, 09:54
Why don't you like the Styer? Was that the Euro made or the Aussie one? (I suspect the former).

And cheers for the info on the lefty M16s guys. Appreciated.

Peregrino
07-27-2005, 10:54
Why don't you like the Styer? Was that the Euro made or the Aussie one? (I suspect the former).

And cheers for the info on the lefty M16s guys. Appreciated.

It was the Austrian version. The Ecuadorans had arms rooms full of non-functional AUGs; probably 30% of their weapons were down. They were being issued M-16s the last time I was there (1995) so they quit trying (canabalizing) to keep them functioning. I have problems with any weapon intended for military use that doesn't live up to expectations when LBGs have to train with, use, and maintain it. I strongly dislike the AK - mostly for it's ergonomics but it and the FN FAL set the standards for reliability, durability, simplicity, etc. The AUG in my experience does not measure up. It might work fine for an advanced military with a good tech base, but SF spends its time in the 3rd World. That's where things have to work without fail and the AUGs I saw didn't. FWIW - Peregrino

Sibilant_Ghost
07-31-2005, 05:02
okay first off I'm back the CLFX at warrior base rocked...

Anyway, the usage of brass deflectors has greatly increased the capability of the left handed soldier when using both the m-16A2 and the M4.

Also, in a file squad moving through light to thick brush/jungle a left-handed shooter is an asset, as all weapons carried at the low ready would be pointing to the left and having a left handed firer or 2 would cover your right flank much better, especially if one is a 203 or a 249/240b to compensate for the lack of fire coverage on the right hand side. So, consider yourself a member of the rare and necessary few for a successful rifle squad. ~Sibilant~

The Reaper
07-31-2005, 09:06
SG:

Brass deflectors are built into the M-16A2s and M-4s, they don't have to be "used".

A good patrol member keeps his weapon oriented outwards regardless of what his primary hand is or which side he is on. Do you have a lot of jungle patrolling experience?

TR

Sibilant_Ghost
07-31-2005, 09:24
My reference was to the right and left flanks of a line squad. A weapon at the ready would be oriented to the left on a right handed person and to the right on a left handed person, on a weapon at the ready or low ready. A right-handed soldier would almost have to place their steps backwards to hold a weapon at the ready in order to guard the right flank of the file.
And on the M16 the weapon tends to discharge brass at a 45 degree angle rearward on the righthand side, and a southpaw soldier would get brass in the face with-out the usage of a brass deflector (an item used regularly in basic training units to prevent the nice welts caused by the 5.56 casing)
My experience with traveling through forested/jungle terrain has consisted mainly of OpFor missions against 6 CAV and 2 ID. We havea few south paws in our unit and they usually end up carrying the SAW for this reason.
Of course with a little bit of experience a left-handed firer can also orient themselves to avoid brass, but the ease of use with the brass deflector (a seperate piece which clips into the between the rail and upper reciever) can take a lot of the hassle out of firing on the move.
~Sibilant~

Doc
07-31-2005, 09:28
There is even a brass deflector on my AR 1200 which is a M-4 wannabee.

I shot right handed and left handed extensively yesterday and yes I was able to hit what I was aiming at.

It's not an unusual feat for anyone that practices at it.

Doc

Sibilant_Ghost
07-31-2005, 09:32
Maybe I was incorrect then. It does happen from time to time perhaps it was merely a training aid used for when us simple soldiers were in diapers so we wouldn't whine if we got hit by flying brass, who knows.

The Reaper
07-31-2005, 09:40
SG:

A right handed soldier just needs to switch to a left handed carry when on the right side of the formation.

A good soldier has practiced left and right handed shooting (particularly in pre-deployment training) and is at least competent with the weak-side technique.

TR

Doc
07-31-2005, 09:40
Hot brass is why I always wear long sleeve shirts, pants, and a hat on the firing line. If you shoot with other people, you're going to have shell casings come down on you.

Doc

Sibilant_Ghost
07-31-2005, 17:05
had tons of hot brqass coming down on me during the CLFX .... I was sitting on theright side of a SAW on the truck

RHRP
08-10-2005, 01:06
Iíve probably come in late to the discussion but for what it is worth. I can confirm in Oz that for the AUSSTEYR with lefties it is also the case of switching ejection ports (just moving the cover over) and changing the ejector claw attached to the bolt (no surprise there). Cocking handle stays in the same spot. The position of the cocking handle is the main concern from the lefties that Iíve spoken to as the design requires them to remove their master hand from the trigger grip when cocking the weapon, particularly when carrying out their IA drills. Some do practice using their non-master hand however they feel that if they do have a stoppage and the weapon isnít firing, then it doesnít matter if they take their master hand off the trigger grip to clear the stoppage.

Smiddy