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Dragbag036
02-18-2013, 21:06
Mods forgive me if this is already posted, but the PJ's have a discover channel show tonight.

http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/inside-combat-rescue/videos/inside-combat-rescue-trailer/

Snaquebite
02-18-2013, 21:58
Watching... Just evaced a SF medic...above the knee leg loss

Brian C
02-18-2013, 22:38
I watched it and enjoyed it. I'm just a cop so I don't know how "made for TV" it is or isn't, but I will continue to watch it.

Streck-Fu
02-19-2013, 07:14
In the DVR.I look forward to watching it. A friend is a former PJ and had good things to say about it.

Smokin Joe
02-19-2013, 10:15
Watching... Just evaced a SF medic...above the knee leg loss

This part really sucked to watch.... Hit to close to home.

Bechorg
02-19-2013, 11:47
When my wife squeezed my hand tight when they were evacuating the 18D I knew it was a great show. It's not made to show off, it's made to inform the people about what the PJs are doing and I really enjoyed it.

SF18C
02-19-2013, 11:53
I have this DVR'ed and plan to watch it tonight. Sounds like it will be worth the 60 min!

fng13
02-19-2013, 13:08
Only caught the second half but thought it was good.

The ODA sending off their wounded medic was tough to watch. Same with him asking for pain killers.

I'm sure there was a good reason for them not giving him something but it was hard to hear him continually asking. It was amazing how collected he seemed.


Sure looked like a damn tough job.

Surgicalcric
02-19-2013, 14:19
Watching... Just evaced a SF medic...above the knee leg loss.
This part really sucked to watch.... Hit to close to home.

Close to home indeed.

Crip

Bill Harsey
02-19-2013, 16:45
What Crip said.

SF18C
02-19-2013, 21:08
Wow, that was a little tough to watch. But it just fills my heart knowing that there are those people that run to the sound of chaos and confusion to aid others.

I sure hope there is a special place in heaven for those PJs!

I will say a prayer tonight for the SF Medics, PJs and others that work within that golden hour!!!

ncart326
02-20-2013, 10:04
I am proud of them and proud of Army Medevac! Which, ofcourse, is what I am associated with.
After watching last nights show, it looked like the samething medevac did.

Stiletto11
02-20-2013, 19:03
Good to get this info out so everyone knows the sacrifice of all involved.

Cake_14N
02-21-2013, 11:22
Pretty good show, I did have a couple of issues with NatGeo. MOO I think they should have blurred out the nametags hanging in the lockers that clearly displayed the first and last names of the CRO. Also, they did not distinguish between PJ and CRO, not that there is too much of a difference, but there is some. ( PJ = enlisted, Paramedic, focused on patient care, site security. CRO = Officer, not Paramedic unless prior PJ, focused on mission planning and employment of the team.)

I have worked with Eric and he is very genuine in his concern to care for both his people and those he is transporting for further treatment.

I hope the series continues and even comes back and gives updates on patients.

Cake

zuluzerosix
02-21-2013, 11:32
That was a really good show. A little back ground on me-

when I was a boring 11b back in the deuce there was a time where there were no not many schools being offered for squat. I started taking correspondance courses.

remember those?

I completed the Army's Basic Medic Course and got a dual mos. Then I convinced the unit to send to me the six-week EMT-I course, then later to EMT-II I was slowly working my way up to Paramedic then Iraq invaded Kuwait.

Anyway I knew just a little bid about emergency medicine.

This Intraosseous infusion that was done of the SF Medic was awsome. That was not around back in my day. Hell, we were still using MAST Trousers back then!

But I researched it this morning and watched a training film on WaisMed's BIG Bone Injection Gun. (http://www.waismed.com/BIGmovie.html)
I would have to think that this was something the military came up with. Military Emergency Medicine has been responsible for many many advances in medicine for a very long time-even dating back to the civil war.

Many of the modern advances have come from the feild expediency of out own 18D medics in the Special Operation Community.

I am not sure that very many people know that.

adal
02-21-2013, 13:11
Z06,
The Israelis came up with the BIG years ago. It works great if you stay proficient on it.

The IO used was the EZIO. Also a very easy to use IO device that is now being used by my EMS crews as first line access in 95% of all codes.

IO's have been around for years (vet care and in WW2 if I recall) It's just that they are "barbaric" so folks dont want to use them. I love em.

11Ber
02-21-2013, 19:32
Show:
I thought it was very well put together. Not SEAL like in trying to make them all look like Billy-Bad asses; just showing what they do and how they do it. I can't lie...I had negative views of PJ's due to some prior experiences but this changes my perspective. Not saying I won't give some a little shit next go 'round but I see them in a new light. Can't wait for next week.

IO:
I don't know why more people aren't into this. It is my choice for access in a severe trauma patient. Guys on the team aren't too stoked to know this but hey, "operator feels no pain."

11Ber

Streck-Fu
02-21-2013, 19:34
Their disappointment in not being sent to help the children is obvious and troubling. You can tell they wanted to help anyone they could.

swatsurgeon
02-27-2013, 08:26
Show:
I thought it was very well put together. Not SEAL like in trying to make them all look like Billy-Bad asses; just showing what they do and how they do it. I can't lie...I had negative views of PJ's due to some prior experiences but this changes my perspective. Not saying I won't give some a little shit next go 'round but I see them in a new light. Can't wait for next week.

IO:
I don't know why more people aren't into this. It is my choice for access in a severe trauma patient. Guys on the team aren't too stoked to know this but hey, "operator feels no pain."

11Ber

Agreed, IO is underutilized. Patients in shock/hypotensive/hypovolemic are the perfect ones for IO and since we have the luxury of choosing locations above or below the diaphram, it makes it a good RAPID access for admin of anything (meds, blood, fluid, etc).
We use it more and more in the trauma center; we have the ability to place central venous catheters but while my residents and other emergency medicine docs are spending precious time trying to get a central line, I've drilled in 1 or 2 IOs and have stuff going in 3-10 minutes before they do.
The fastest central line I've placed from start to finish is probably 60 seconds or so whereas an IO is less than 10 seconds to have in and running.

ss

Stargazer
02-28-2013, 11:52
I have enjoyed the series and will continue to watch. Have always had a deep abiding respect for EMTs, Firemen and others who rush to the aid of people, having been a benefactor of their skill and calm reassurance. God sent angels in the eyes of many they assist.

I had an Uncle who was an HN (Hospital Corpsman) during the Korean War. Told he was a part of the teams that came to the aid of injured soldiers and prepared them for evacution. My mother recalls the toll that experience had on her brother. I believe he carried a great deal silently until the day he died.

It's difficult to find the words to describe my admiration and heartfelt gratitude for those "who risk their lives, so that others may live." Valiant angels from above, comes to mind.. I thank God for you each day!

af_rigger
02-28-2013, 12:07
I was a rigger for the PJ's out at Nellis AFB back in the early 90's. Respected the hell out of those guys!

Sdiver
03-13-2013, 01:59
In case anyone hasn't seen these, or just wants to watch them again (without commercial interruptions ;) ), here are all the episodes.

Inside Combat Rescue - Part 1:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Rc4_2_YXuw

Inside Combat Rescue - Part 2:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vae1Cr8rC_M

Inside Combat Rescue - Part 3:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7C-4P1H0yg

Inside Combat Rescue - Part 4:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=le1QM1PMXxg

Inside Combat Rescue - Part 5:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6j5fJ4HEVA

Inside Combat Rescue - Part 6:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u9SpEn73LVg



Bravo Zulu Little Brother .... Bravo Zulu

Surgicalcric
03-13-2013, 08:38
IO:
I don't know why more people aren't into this. It is my choice for access in a severe trauma patient. Guys on the team aren't too stoked to know this but hey, "operator feels no pain."

11Ber

If and when the time comes that guys need an IO instead of you spending time attempting a peripheral site their bodies will already be in pain overload and wont even notice the IO. I know. ;)

Streck-Fu
03-13-2013, 08:48
The kid with the GSW to the head in Monday's episode definitely reacted to the IO attempt.

ncart326
03-13-2013, 09:31
My primary concern is patient care. Being a Medevac crewchief in Afghanistan last year, we had numerous missions were canceled even though we were 5-10 minutes from POI. Instead, they would spool up Pedro, or Tricky(Brits). The only problem with that is Pedro, and Tricky were 30 minutes away.
So far, after watching this show, I have seen no difference in the way Pedro and Medevac operate in Afghanistan. What's more cost effective? If you haven't noticed yet, ( during the show) when you see Pedro leaving the airfield, you can see a Medevac units aircraft parked right beside them.
Another obsevation is their medical abilities have not impressed me thusfar. I am only comparing what I experienced out of FOB Edi last year, ( which was the busiest in theatre).

swatsurgeon
03-13-2013, 09:40
The kid with the GSW to the head in Monday's episode definitely reacted to the IO attempt.

Problem with the PJ's IO attempt: no gun or driver. He was pushing the IO in, not twisting it in and it won't break through the outer cortex of bone that way without A LOT of pressure and that likely would cause pain. The usual pain for insertion with either the gun or driver handle is a 3-4:10 in my experience.

I watched it several times to figure out why he had an IO failure because that is truly a rare occurance......it was not a failure of IO, it was operator error, something to learn from for him and all other providers.

ss

Streck-Fu
03-13-2013, 09:52
Problem with the PJ's IO attempt: no gun or driver. He was pushing the IO in, not twisting it in and it won't break through the outer cortex of bone that way without A LOT of pressure and that likely would cause pain. The usual pain for insertion with either the gun or driver handle is a 3-4:10 in my experience.

I watched it several times to figure out why he had an IO failure because that is truly a rare occurance......it was not a failure of IO, it was operator error, something to learn from for him and all other providers.

ss

I have not watched the episode again so am working from memory. Was the PJ attempting IO the young kid on his first deployment? I can't remember his name...
Was this possibly a factor of his inexperience and a mental vapor lock under pressure?
Do you think the error was caught and remediated at the unit level?

swatsurgeon
03-13-2013, 13:04
I have not watched the episode again so am working from memory. Was the PJ attempting IO the young kid on his first deployment? I can't remember his name...
Was this possibly a factor of his inexperience and a mental vapor lock under pressure?
Do you think the error was caught and remediated at the unit level?

1) Don't know
2) Could be
3) Should have been

11Ber
03-13-2013, 20:22
I was surprised to see the PJ go for a hand driven IO on this kid. He was alert to pain and moving around. I would have grabbed the drill and hammered it. But hindsight is 20/10 since we all see better than the Operator in the moment.:p

NCart: Pedro is chose usually due to the armament they bring with them and the fact that they carry up to 3 highly trained medics. No offense but a regular MEDEVAC medic can't match these guys in their knowledge, experience and training. Not trying to piss you off, it's just facts. And I know there are great MEDEVAC medics out there but they just aren't as good and their birds don't rock MK-44' and M-2's. As for your FOB being the "busiest in theatre"...Everyone tries to claim this. I helped at an FST in 2011 that rocked 100+ ATLS patients a month all summer. Sounds like you are jaded from being benched. I haven't seen them do anything that was bad medicine; they don't make the decisions, they just execute.

ncart326
03-14-2013, 09:18
11Ber,
No offense taken. I respect your opinion, but I have been witness to soldiers and marines that die due to medevac taking too long. ( no fault of Pedro, or Tricky).
As far as the medical side of the house, our medics are National Guard not AD. Most of them are either paramedics, or nurses. They don't " High Five" after successful IV insertion. I do agree that the average PJ is better trained than the avg Medic, but in my case, I saw different. I have seen some aweful medics!
Patient Care is my concern! The M2's are cool and all, but I have yet to see them fire. In Medevac, we volunteer, and know the danger. That is Medevac legacy. We are not concerned about that or air cover when it's an ISAF soldier that is a CAT A.
This is just my point of view. If your not going to use Medevac, don't send us over there.

Nate

I was surprised to see the PJ go for a hand driven IO on this kid. He was alert to pain and moving around. I would have grabbed the drill and hammered it. But hindsight is 20/10 since we all see better than the Operator in the moment.:p

NCart: Pedro is chose usually due to the armament they bring with them and the fact that they carry up to 3 highly trained medics. No offense but a regular MEDEVAC medic can't match these guys in their knowledge, experience and training. Not trying to piss you off, it's just facts. And I know there are great MEDEVAC medics out there but they just aren't as good and their birds don't rock MK-44' and M-2's. As for your FOB being the "busiest in theatre"...Everyone tries to claim this. I helped at an FST in 2011 that rocked 100+ ATLS patients a month all summer. Sounds like you are jaded from being benched. I haven't seen them do anything that was bad medicine; they don't make the decisions, they just execute.

RedLegGI
03-15-2013, 14:54
Just watched all of the episodes last night back to back. Very impressed with how it was presented and the level of professionalism for all involved. Something that really stood out to me was how they calmly exited the bird to get to the wounded. Seemed almost calming.

We had guys medevaced and I was left in the dark about what happened next. This shed some light on it. I'm looking forward to the next episode.

Matman
03-16-2013, 13:02
I just finished the 4th eppisode last night. I'm very impressed by the way Nat Geo portrays these guys. I'd say OPSEC was lacking for the individual's. I hate seeing names and faces and hometowns. But I understand the reason of it being a bit more humanizing of them to the viewers.

Amazing to see the dedication with which they respond to each call!

Sdiver
03-20-2013, 23:15
Uploaded latest episode -Episode 5 .....

http://www.professionalsoldiers.com/forums/showpost.php?p=495772&postcount=22

MR2
03-20-2013, 23:47
Thanks Sdiver.

PSM
03-21-2013, 20:08
In case anyone hasn't seen these, or just wants to watch them again (without commercial interruptions ;) ), here are the first four shows.

Inside Combat Rescue - Part 1:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Rc4_2_YXuw

Inside Combat Rescue - Part 2:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vae1Cr8rC_M

Inside Combat Rescue - Part 3:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7C-4P1H0yg

Inside Combat Rescue - Part 4:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=le1QM1PMXxg

Inside Combat Rescue - Part 5:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6j5fJ4HEVA



Bravo Zulu Little Brother .... Bravo Zulu

Thanks, SPK. Not having TV, I rely on youtube and similar links.

Gee, those guys look awfully young.

Pat

Sdiver
03-27-2013, 01:35
Episode 6 added ....

http://www.professionalsoldiers.com/forums/showpost.php?p=495772&postcount=22

This one was a little tough to watch.

orion5
03-27-2013, 20:03
This one was a little tough to watch.

It really was... I saw a few comments SFC McNabb's mom made on FB. Their family had a hard time watching it, too.

I wish every American, including children, had to sit and watch this show (or one like it). It's the perfect visual for the phrase "FREEDOM ISN'T FREE".

swatsurgeon
03-28-2013, 10:06
I have only the highest respect for all of the medical providers like the PJ's on that show but I sincerely hope that all field practice is critiqued/reviewed so that other providers can be better educated to provide even better front line trauma care.......
SFC McNabbs death was tragic and emotional on all fronts and I don't want to second guess the medical personnel that rescue, treat and transport a victim but with a blast that causes a triple amputation like his, there are a few other potential life saving maneuvers that ?? could have been done and infact may have but we as viewers didn't see evidence of it. Decompressing both chests for punctured lungs which is common after a blast injury, running blood through 2 sites not 1....again, I'm not trying the do an AAR since I wasn't there and don't know all that was attempted or done and with such severe wounds, his death was likely inevidable, but......as a trauma surgeon, the idea of forward advanced practitioners with even higher level training and competence seems plausable/reasonable with the horrific wounds seen in this conflict...[where are the 18D's??]
The episode where the PJ had to do a cricothyrotomy; his first, should have been a routine case despite never having done it to a live patient...his practice time should have been 'exhaustive' so that it was almost routine which when I watched that scene a few times, was not 'routine' appearing (I know, TV editing likely was at play).
I feel helpless watching that show, wanting to reach out and help....one of my greatest self disappointments was never having served/being able to use my skills on the hero's that are at war. My involvement with law enforcement as a tactical medical provider is as close as I get and a small way to 'pay back' those that serve.

Respectfully,

ss