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olhamada
01-16-2010, 16:53
I've just been asked to help pull together a medical team for Haiti.

What I'm trying to do in the next few hours is compile a list of medical equipment that an anonymous company has agreed to supply within 24 - 48 hours.

What would you recommend we take? Infil is on 2 single engine Piper aircraft with a payload of 700 kg each landing 50 km south of Port a Prince on a short hard dirt runway. One will carry personnel, the other will carry supplies and equipment.

frostfire
01-16-2010, 17:02
Are security and plans for contingency in place?

Sorry I'm not contributing, but I'm concerned over your and the other personnel safety.

This might be redundant, but when I volunteered with medshare, I was told medical mission can get supply there for free or very low cost
http://www.medshare.org/files/blog/file/Haiti%20Relief%20Supplies.pdf

olhamada
01-16-2010, 17:47
Are security and plans for contingency in place?

Sorry I'm not contributing, but I'm concerned over your and the other personnel safety.

This might be redundant, but when I volunteered with medshare, I was told medical mission can get supply there for free or very low cost
http://www.medshare.org/files/blog/file/Haiti%20Relief%20Supplies.pdf

Thanks frostfire.

Re safety/security - Does a cat have climbing gear? :) No definitive plans yet, but in process. Mostly civilian team with no SA or experience in potentially hostile environments.

Books
01-16-2010, 18:08
First, I would bring a gun. Actually, I would bring several guns and an understanding that you may find yourself on the other side of a mob with machetes who think you have something worth stealing.

I would think in terms of nuts and bolts. People who have been insulin dependent are screwed (no electricity to refrigerate insulin). Don't worry too much about the chronically ill. They'll be dead soon enough. Focus on those who were healthy prior to being wounded and whom you believe you can return to health.

I would pack a smattering of broad spectrum antibiotics to cover those who are allergic to one or another. I would have plenty of anti-diarrheals. I would pack water disinfectants (bleach would work, as would Iodine). I would pack splinting and bandaging materials, surgical debriedment supplies since you're going to probably have wounds which haven't been treated and have now festered and I would be prepared to amputate a few limbs from gangrenous wounds. You'll need fluids for irrigation. . . heavy to bring, but boiled salted water is better than nothing. . . Of course I would bring IV fluids and requisite catheters/drip sets.

I'm trying to gin up a mission to go as well so god speed and stay safe.

Books

Brush Okie
01-16-2010, 19:52
Lots of leather gloves. Sounds funny but the number one thing they needed during the Mexico quake years ago was leather gloves.

Lots of laytex gloves. High HIV rate there.

Lots of soap. The basics will not be there.

Anti biotics for treatment of dynentary and other infections.

some way to treat your water. several high quality filters are needed. The basics will not be there.

Chlorene bleach. A 10% solution for clean up will kill all bad bugs. Note, is only good for 24 hours. you need to mix a new batch after that.

As said above take something to protect yourself. i prefer a 12 gauge shotgun but to each their own. i would take a selection of stuff if it were me.

I am sure others will give you more info on more medical equiptment like sutures etc etc. I am sure the basics are needed like bandages, kerelex etc etc. Oh yea, take some picks and shovels to bury the dead. Some diesel to burn the bodies if you cant bury them .

Sdiver
01-16-2010, 20:02
Lots of leather gloves. Sounds funny but the number one thing they needed during the Mexico quake years ago was leather gloves.

Lots of laytex gloves. High HIV rate there.

Lots of soap. The basics will not be there.

Anti biotics for treatment of dynentary and other infections.

some way to treat your water. several high quality filters are needed. The basics will not be there.

Chlorene bleach. A 10% solution for clean up will kill all bad bugs. Note, is only good for 24 hours. you need to mix a new batch after that.

As said above take something to protect yourself. i prefer a 12 gauge shotgun but to each their own. i would take a selection of stuff if it were me.

I am sure others will give you more info on more medical equiptment like sutures etc etc. I am sure the basics are needed like bandages, kerelex etc etc. Oh yea, take some picks and shovels to bury the dead. Some diesel to burn the bodies if you cant bury them .

Good list.

In fact the 1st thing I was gong to say is GLOVES.
Leather gloves and PPE gloves. I would avoid Latex gloves for the simple fact some people are allergic to latex. So just the standard PPE gloves, like found in any ED/ER, is the way to go.

Aside from any disinfectant, bring plenty of "Cavicide" wipes. To clean equipment.

Masks. Simple ones and also some N-95 masks. Smells and "Nasty bugs" (ie Virus') are going to be high.

Vicks vapor rub, for placing under your nostrils, to mask the "smell" of bodies.

Tape. Duct tape (100 mph), cotton tape, IV tape, ect. You'd be amazed at how much tape it used in a emergency medical environment.

Pens, pens, and more pens. Also, plenty of "Sharpie" pens, in various colors.

Just a few things off the top of my head. Hope it helps. As I think of more I'll post them.

olddoc
01-16-2010, 22:19
Malaria prophylaxis, mosquito net, will for all members. I would not go without military security. In 1-2 weeks the lid might come off.
Good luck.

Brush Okie
01-16-2010, 22:28
Malaria prophylaxis, mosquito net, will for all members. I would not go without military security. In 1-2 weeks the lid might come off.
Good luck.

I already heard reports of roving gangs of people with machetti's I am sure the media is keeping that quiet.

18C4V
01-17-2010, 00:19
First, I would bring a gun. Actually, I would bring several guns and an understanding that you may find yourself on the other side of a mob with machetes who think you have something worth stealing.



I agree on that. For Operation Uphold Democracy in 1994, our NG SF company got mobilzied for that. One 18B on one of the teams had to shoot an armed combatant during an attempted looting. I actually talked to the 18B a few years ago about his shooting, I was at a cop event and the 18B was there due to his brother in law being a cop in my dept.

Sigaba
01-17-2010, 00:50
I already heard reports of roving gangs of people with machetti's I am sure the media is keeping that quiet.FWIW, the MSM media reports I'm seeing are pushing the 'break down into chaos' story line.

wet dog
01-17-2010, 01:50
Go with your head on right, game face, and the ability to see yourself through.

Be aware, you might have to push back, remember women and children first, don't trust anyone to do your thinking for you, question everything.

Good luck,

WD

Brush Okie
01-17-2010, 01:58
I agree on that. For Operation Uphold Democracy in 1994, our NG SF company got mobilzied for that. One 18B on one of the teams had to shoot an armed combatant during an attempted looting. I actually talked to the 18B a few years ago about his shooting, I was at a cop event and the 18B was there due to his brother in law being a cop in my dept.

I remember an 18 got killed there doing a raid. I wonder who come up with the bright idea of one A team= a local police Dept. :confused: I guess somebody had to do it.

JJ_BPK
01-17-2010, 05:25
Let me add a few thoughts

1)most of your team should speak french, creo is all you get in the back country

2)shelter, you need some large tents and tarps to set up triage, pre-evac paient staging, PLUS you need somewhere to sleep. Assume there will be other quakes and ALL structures are un-usable. THEY HAVE NO BUILDING CODES...

3)knee pads, uniforms, boots, you will not have beds for patients, your team will be kneeling in rubble to admin, they will become injured if not properly protected.

4)designated security, most of your team will be very loving and caring,, team members will not react to machetes well. They will need protection.

5)communication, Sat-phones, batteries, small 2000-3000 watt gas or multi-fuel generator, solar power chargers

6)established egress plan if the SHTF... Make sure your back-up(UN peace keepers, or whoever) are in the loop and fully prepared to support you... ALSO committed to DAILY re-supply and medivac for the seriously injured..

7)Constantia wire to establish a compound..

8)stab vests/jackets for your team, anything else will be to heavy and obvious.


Good Luck..


My $00.0002

Fiercely Loyal
01-17-2010, 06:04
Deleted

JJ_BPK
01-17-2010, 06:10
You need to take this as a normal reaction by UN peace keepers.

Be Very careful. They can and will leave you hanging..

http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/americas/01/16/haiti.abandoned.patients/index.html?hpt=T2

Security concerns cause doctors to leave hospital, quake victims
January 16, 2010 6:33 p.m. EST Port-au-Prince, Haiti (CNN) -- Earthquake victims, writhing in pain and grasping at life, watched doctors and nurses walk away from a field hospital Friday night after a Belgian medical team evacuated the area, saying it was concerned about security.

The decision left CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Sanjay Gupta as the only doctor at the hospital to get the patients through the night.

CNN initially reported, based on conversations with some of the doctors, that the United Nations ordered the Belgian First Aid and Support Team to evacuate. However, Belgian Chief Coordinator Geert Gijs, a doctor who was at the hospital with 60 Belgian medical personnel, said it was his decision to pull the team out for the night.

Gijs said he requested U.N. security personnel to staff the hospital overnight, but was told that peacekeepers would only be able to evacuate the team. He said it was a "tough decision" but that he accepted the U.N. offer to evacuate after a Canadian medical team, also at the hospital with Canadian security officers, left the site Friday afternoon. The Belgian team returned Saturday morning.

The Reaper
01-17-2010, 09:33
I remember an 18 got killed there doing a raid. I wonder who come up with the bright idea of one A team= a local police Dept. :confused: I guess somebody had to do it.

Greg Cardott. He was not doing a raid, he was manning a checkpoint.

He was a Q Course classmate of mine.

RIP, brother.

TR

Mr Furious
01-17-2010, 10:00
Quite a few folks mention wpns...I'd like to posit - what are the current policies/legal aspects of toting a gun as a civilian/contractor there, and what are the consequences if you actually use it in self defense?

I know it's absolute chaos and I know security is a concern, but need to seriously think that through and look into it before going guns up and jumping on a private flight there.

During Uphold Democracy we had an abundace of non-lethal (pepper spray) and used the heck out of it when warranted. After a while the street savy Haitians started to file formal complaints that would come rolling down. Not sure what the landscape is like today in a civilian capacity going to lend aid.

Brush Okie
01-17-2010, 10:27
6)established egress plan if the SHTF... Make sure your back-up(UN peace keepers, or whoever) are in the loop and fully prepared to support you... ALSO committed to DAILY re-supply and medivac for the seriously injured..

7

My $00.0002

I wouldn't count on the UN. They as worthless as tits on a bore hog.

Big Money
01-17-2010, 12:10
Take a crash course in Creole. It is quite easy, especially if you have any previous language training. I had a fella tell me one time "the country speaks French, but the people speak Creole- if you want to talk to me, speak my language". That was pivitol. On another occasion, I was listening to two Jaques who were planning my demise. They didn't know the white guy could understand them. I essentially told them "if you mess with me, I'll crack your skulls". Their mouths dropped in disbelief that "the blanc" spoke Creole. They were my new best friend and busted their asses to help me out all day. Take home message is that if you can communicate and build rapport, SOME people, just like people in any other country, will do what they can to help and support you.

Do not assume machetes, large knives, clubs, etc are always weapons. If you can speak Creole and ask "why do you have that", alot of situations can be defused before they even become a situation. However, it would seem that a desperate population has become even more desperate. Do not judge good people who do bad things in bad times. If my family was dying, I would take extreme measures to save them. But from the other perspective, if clubbing an angry woman meant I could continue to save a dozen others, than I will take her out and treat her injuries once I have the opportunity. I am thinking the situation is going to deteriorate quickly so defensive positions, concertina, panic-rooms, "the Alamo", and a fast boat with the engine idling have to be considered in the plan- you can not hold off 100,000's starving, dying people with good intentions, even if you team is armed.

In the meantime:

You should assume you will have NO access to water. Period. The water off the coast along PAP is undoubtedly so toxic from unregulated pollutants, sewage, and runoff that even under normal conditions that no amount of treatment will make it safe to drink. Local bottled water doesn't mean it's necessarily any better, even in the best circumstances.

I would guess that latex gloves under leather gloves would be the way to go in many instances. Infectious disease will be more than rampant. I would be less concerned about latex allergies than malaria, anthrax, tetnus, HIV, TB, etc.

Keep your geographical location in mind: if you get rains or storms, there will be flooding, landslides, etc- plus all the death and debris now flowing. You will not want to be looking for the high ground after the fact.

Assume you are on your own: any agency, organization, etc will be maxed out on their own problems. UN? Forgetaboutit.

Good luck to all.

Mr Furious
01-17-2010, 17:01
Very sound advice/guidance from Big Money. FYI - I was under FOB 32 in 95 at the team house in Petite Goave. What you mention above resonates quite well with me.

head
01-17-2010, 18:08
Does a cat have climbing gear? :)

Well then, may the Lord keep your claws sharp. :)
Good luck and stay safe over there.

frostfire
01-17-2010, 20:43
Some diesel to burn the bodies if you cant bury them .

I know it's not exactly a hearts and mind mission, and people may not care in the midst of overwhelming physical needs, but check/verify the local religious/cultural aspects before starting any huge human bonfire. Perception is reality. Add to that several journalists with an agenda and you're done.

Brush Okie
01-17-2010, 21:29
I know it's not exactly a hearts and mind mission, and people may not care in the midst of overwhelming physical needs, but check/verify the local religious/cultural aspects before starting any huge human bonfire. Perception is reality. Add to that several journalists with an agenda and you're done.

If they get upset throw them on the pile as well. :p

Good point. I was in sanatation mode not CA mode. Thanks for the SA correction.

frostfire
01-17-2010, 23:22
If they get upset throw them on the pile as well. :p

Good point. I was in sanatation mode not CA mode. Thanks for the SA correction.

Assuming the article is accurate and relevant all across, your suggestion is GTG

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti – Prayers of thanksgiving and cries for help rose from Haiti's huddled homeless Sunday, the sixth day of an epic humanitarian crisis that was straining the world's ability to respond and igniting flare-ups of violence amid the rubble of Port-au-Prince.

Haitian police struggled to scatter hundreds of stone-throwing looters in the city's Vieux Marche, or Old Market. Elsewhere downtown, amid the smoke from bonfires burning uncollected bodies, gunfire rang out and bands of machete-wielding young men roamed the streets, faces hidden by bandanas.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100118/ap_on_re_la_am_ca/cb_haiti_earthquake

olhamada
01-18-2010, 09:14
Well, as things have developed, I'm serving as more of an "on-the-ground" consultant, but because of work/family obligations won't be going. They leave tomorrow.

I really appreciate all the excellent information and acivice you've given. I am passing this on to the team going. Unfortunately, they are all civilian with no experience in hostile or even disaster areas and feel security issues are "overblown". They believe goodwill will overcome hostile intent. Oh well, what's the old saying? "You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink"?

I hope and pray they stay safe despite their lack of SA.

They are going down to help a friend who runs an orphanage in Jacmel.

Mr Furious
01-18-2010, 11:28
They are going down to help a friend who runs an orphanage in Jacmel.

Only one way there by road, and hopefully its open for them. Best of luck.

JJ_BPK
01-18-2010, 12:03
Jacmel is a town of 40k people
3k ft semi-improved landing strip on the East side
Looks to be 40 miles, by road, from Port-au-Prince.

Not good ju-ju...

:mad::mad::mad::mad:


Vaya con Dios...

armymom1228
01-18-2010, 12:11
Well, as things have developed, I'm serving as more of an "on-the-ground" consultant, but because of work/family obligations won't be going. They leave tomorrow.

I really appreciate all the excellent information and acivice you've given. I am passing this on to the team going. Unfortunately, they are all civilian with no experience in hostile or even disaster areas and feel security issues are "overblown". They believe goodwill win overcome hostile intent. Oh well, what's the old saying? "You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink"?

I hope and pray they stay safe despite their lack of SA.

They are going down to help a friend who runs an orphanage in Jacmel.[/QUOTE]

Jacmel is on the south side of the island, pretty far from PaP.
Other side of the mtn so to speak. They will probably be okay.
TV shows it getting ugly in PaP.

[quote]Infil is on 2 single engine Piper aircraft with a payload of 700 kg each landing 50 km south of Port a Prince on a short hard dirt runway.

Can I safely assume this runway is near Jacmel? If is not on that side of the mtns, all roads lead through PaP.
Just looked at roadways.. nothing decent from the other side where the road stops at Belle-Anse. Rest would be 'tracks' that the locals use to get along the coast. Hope your freinds are carrying a sat phone. Tell them to not go out alone, twos.. groups..
Gatorage, powdered is worth its wt in gold in that heat. Correctly administered it should be half strength. Tell them to take natural clothing. It breathes and is hand washable. A few bottles of good dishsoap will be invaluable. Joy.. you can wash your dishes, clothes and self in it. Bleach, it is good for purifying water, wounds (heavily diluted) and cleaing surfaces.
I have, somewhere in my stuff here a recipe for homemade pedialyte, you want me to pm it to you? It is good for all ages. Salt tablets for those not used to the tropics..warn them about getting sunburned and make them carry sunscreen!
.
jacmel location (http://www.mapquest.com/maps?city=Jacmel&state=Sud-Est&country=HT&latitude=18.233299&longitude=-72.533302&geocode=CITY)

Brush Okie
01-18-2010, 12:13
Our prayers will be with them.

sparks1
01-20-2010, 21:53
For what it's worth...My brother (Former SF) went into Haiti last week for search and rescue. FIRST item on equipment list ...weapons for security of personnel and equipment. Team was fully equiped to be self sufficient for 10+ days.
I cannot contact him, the reason is cell service is sporadic. I suggest a solar charger for you cell phones. Available on the internet cheap enough to have a few around. No electricity to charge your satellite or cell phone. Recommend the satellite phone
+1 on the lists above. Be smart and be safe.
Oops... just got word he and his team will return to Miami Fri. He should be home a few days later.

Red Flag 1
01-21-2010, 06:56
For what it's worth...My brother (Former SF) went into Haiti last week for search and rescue. FIRST item on equipment list ...weapons for security of personnel and equipment. Team was fully equiped to be self sufficient for 10+ days.
I cannot contact him, the reason is cell service is sporadic. I suggest a solar charger for you cell phones. Available on the internet cheap enough to have a few around. No electricity to charge your satellite or cell phone. Recommend the satellite phone
+1 on the lists above. Be smart and be safe.
Oops... just got word he and his team will return to Miami Fri. He should be home a few days later.

Got an Eton Solarlink FR 360 hand crank/battery radio over the holidays; marketed by LL Bean. Has a cell phone charge ability via USB jack. Ten minutes of crank time is said to recharge enough for one or two, "short emergency calls". I have not tried this feature yet.

My first thought when I saw this thread was similar to most, ammo, ammo, and something use the ammo. Grim thoughts but essential IMHO.

RF 1

greenberetTFS
01-21-2010, 14:43
Got an Eton Solarlink FR 360 hand crank/battery radio over the holidays; marketed by LL Bean. Has a cell phone charge ability via USB jack. Ten minutes of crank time is said to recharge enough for one or two, "short emergency calls". I have not tried this feature yet.

My first thought when I saw this thread was similar to most, ammo, ammo, and something use the ammo. Grim thoughts but essential IMHO.

RF 1

Jim,

That is a real handy piece of gear to have,wish I had it during Katrina.... :) We were out of cell service for 5 weeks,but after they got back up it would have been when we could have used it,that's for sure............... ;)

Big Teddy :munchin

sparks1
01-21-2010, 16:26
Good idea on the radio.

USB jack to recharge cell phone...I guess I would need some kind of adaptor to connect to my phone. Radio Shack , or similiar , would have these.

Solar chargers seem to have a battery attached and lots of different connectors. Simply charge the battery and plug it into your phone...Should fully re-charge you cell in a short time. Unplug and recharge the battery on the solar charger. Cell phone is detached and ready to go.

Red Flag 1
01-21-2010, 16:45
Jim,

That is a real handy piece of gear to have,wish I had it during Katrina.... :) We were out of cell service for 5 weeks,but after they got back up it would have been when we could have used it,that's for sure............... ;)

Big Teddy :munchin

I think the best feature is it's ability to sniff for NOAA severe weather alerts. Will turn on and broadcast alerts 24/7, if selected. Great for tornado time!!

RF 1

olhamada
01-23-2010, 15:31
Well, we've got 2 teams down there. One orthopedist in Jacmel who's doing a dozen cases a day under local and is physically and emotionally exhausted.

The second team consists of 2 anesthesiologists in Port au Prince at Kings Hospital. They need us to ship them two Drager units which we have now appropriated and palletized. Problem is we have no air transport.

I will post the actual payload dimentions shortly but each weighs about 300 kg. Any ideas on how to get these from Nashville to PaP?

Any help is certainly appreciated. I will also check with 160th, but probably need fixed wing.

Thanks!

olhamada
01-23-2010, 16:29
Well, we've got 2 teams down there. One orthopedist in Jacmel who's doing a dozen cases a day under local and is physically and emotionally exhausted.

The second team consists of 2 anesthesiologists in Port au Prince at Kings Hospital. They need us to ship them two Drager units which we have now appropriated and palletized. Problem is we have no air transport.

I will post the actual payload dimentions shortly but each weighs about 300 kg. Any ideas on how to get these from Nashville to PaP?

Any help is certainly appreciated. I will also check with 160th, but probably need fixed wing.

Thanks!

Ok, here's what my contact just wrote. Any ideas are appreciated!

"Once we crated and padded these two Draeger Anesthesia machines we found the approximate dimensions to be 72" x 40" x 40" each. The machines are boxed and banded in plywood. Inside the boxes are some auxillary anesthesia equipment strapped to the supporting pallet. The weight of each box is approximately 650 lbs. They need to go to King's Hospital in Port-au-Prince where Dr. Binney and Dr. Jameison are going to be working. How we get the boxes to them is also a challenge on top of just getting them to Port au Prince. Lemme know what you find out."

JJ_BPK
01-23-2010, 16:42
Ok, here's what my contact just wrote. Any ideas are appreciated!

I'd go to Drager corp and ask if they want some cheap PR for humanitarian work..

They may jump at the chance..



Customer Service & Support
Dräger Service Call center

We appreciate your business and want to provide outstanding and excellent customer service! For more information, please contact our customer service and support representatives by phone or fax.

To e-mail us please use our contact form:
http://www.draeger.com/US/en_US/commonContactDistributor.action

Or call:

Draeger Medical Inc.
3135 Quarry Road
Telford, PA 18969
General Operator
Phone: +1 215 721 5400
Fax: +1 215 723-5935
Dräger Service Triage Center
Phone: 1-800-437-2437 (Hours of Operation: 24x7)


Then I'd try the airlines: AA, Air France, Virgin......

olhamada
01-23-2010, 18:15
Thanks JJ BPK - will give it a shot.

regular guy
01-24-2010, 13:23
Just got some intel regarding that country. If you are heading over, you probably know more than I do, but if it keeps one guy 'safe', then it's worth it.

Quote from an email I received:

“Please tell your men "experts" are quietly having there people double up on masks, eye protection, GLOVES, and recommending protecting their bodies - such as keeping sleeves rolled down no matter how hot it is - because Haiti is such an AIDS infested environment.

Cuts, bodily fluids, lots of human contact; security guys need to take extra precautions.”

'I personally recommend getting some kind of Kevlar knife resistant type gloves as you may have to clear debris along the way just to do your job or to carve out a place to live…'

Here are a few websites that have equipment checklists… you may want to peruse these lists for some equipment ideas or to develop a tailored personal list.

http://www.1srg.org/Contributed-Materials/PackLists/SAR_Equipment_List_Compilation.pdf

http://fourriversk9team.org/Documents/Minimum%20Personal%20Equipment%20Checklist.pdf

http://www.vdem.state.va.us/programs/sar/equipment.cfm#ftm

http://www.vdem.state.va.us/programs/sar/equipment.cfm

Finally, there is much more out there if you have time to research, this is just a quick search on the topic, but bringing your own set of tools, small cutting supplies (circular saw and or saws all), and thinking through some “what if’s” using some of these guides may go a long way if you have another quake. Know some basic knots (square knot, and bowline are two for sure) Also, be aware of the possibility of large gangs or just simply hordes of people that may want what you have... have a plan for self defense as well as an E&E plan wherever you are living…

Good luck and stay safe. RG.

jatx
01-25-2010, 21:40
Good idea on the radio.

USB jack to recharge cell phone...I guess I would need some kind of adaptor to connect to my phone. Radio Shack , or similiar , would have these.

Solar chargers seem to have a battery attached and lots of different connectors. Simply charge the battery and plug it into your phone...Should fully re-charge you cell in a short time. Unplug and recharge the battery on the solar charger. Cell phone is detached and ready to go.

None really work as advertised. They are very slow to charge in even bright equatorial sunlight. I have been disappointed with every major model currently for sale.

The Reaper
01-25-2010, 21:50
None really work as advertised. They are very slow to charge in even bright equatorial sunlight. I have been disappointed with every major model currently for sale.

I agree.

One the size of a briefcase MIGHT charge a few small batteries.

TR

olhamada
01-27-2010, 15:06
Here's the link to what we're doing.

http://www.fellowshipnashville.org/content/AnnounceDetails.aspx?AnnounceId=5744

Boomer-61
01-28-2010, 13:31
One of my colleges passed on some information from two of his friends who've just returned from Haiti. His words, "Conditions are as barbaric as it gets. There's nothing to work with, no anesthesia, no tools, no hardware, horrid conditions to operate. We're doing amputations with nothing and hoping for the best, it's all you can do."
It sounds like everything from nuts to bolts is needed. Being proficient at regional blocks would be a plus. Being able to give the families wound supplies would be helpful. It's got to be overwhelming trying to put something like this together.
You're getting some great recommendations, things I haven't considered. Thanks for doing this. Good luck.

LR27
02-01-2010, 22:36
I just read a weapons policy for USG personnel having to get permits approved by the COM, but no one has said anything about civilians. Has anyone heard anything definite on private security bringing weapons into Port au-Prince?

I'm heading down at the end of the month, and I am wondering whether I should just settle with concealing my Kimber TLE/RL II, or if I should risk bringing a 12 gauge or an AR.

Thoughts?