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Old 11-18-2005, 18:32   #1
Sinister
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2006 Army Rifle and Pistol Championships

The United States Army Marksmanship Unit will host the 2006 Army Rifle and Pistol Championships at the United States Army Infantry Center, Fort Benning, Georgia from 3 March thru 11 March 2006, and the US Army Long-Range Championships from 12 to 14 March. Training and competitions are open to all Soldiers of all Army components, all ranks, units, and MOSs, including West Point and college ROTC cadets.

The All-Army is an advance combat marksmanship training event and competition. All Soldiers fire both the M16 and M9 in helmet and load-bearing equipment (body armor optional) from 25 to 500 yards with the M16 and 7 to 25 yards with the M9. Teams from battalion-level compete for unit recognition and team awards. All Soldiers will receive advance marksmanship instruction and training materials to conduct Train-the-Trainer clinics on return to home station.

The US Army Long-Range Championships will provide M14 and M24 Long Range shooting training from 600 to 1,000 yards. This is an excellent vehicle for those Soldiers and units reorganized into Brigade Combat Teams and Reconnaissance Battalions who do not hold MOS 11 or 18 and cannot attend the US Army Sniper School.

The All-Army Matches are designed to raise the shooting proficiency of Soldiers and units across the Army by teaching advance combat marksmanship techniques using issue rifles and pistols. Coaches and NCOICs of the US Army Rifle and Pistol Teams, Army Reserve, and All-Guard Teams scout, identify, and invite selected Soldiers to compete at the Interservice Championships and the National Matches. Soldiers selected to represent the Active Army are funded by the USAMU.

The All-Army Matches consist of Small Arms Firing Schools; the Secretary of the Army Matches; Chief of Staff of the Army Matches; Sergeant Major of the Army Team Matches; Excellence-in-Competition Matches; and special combat matches. Champions will be awarded All-Army trophies and Excellence-in-Competition marksmanship badges (permanent-wear awards described in AR 600-22 above the standard marksman, sharpshooter, and expert qualification badges). The most coveted awards are Secretary of the Army Trophy M1 Garand Rifles. A new Drill Sergeant Champion award has been commissioned for 2005.

Soldiers compete in separate "Novice", "Open", and "Pro" classes based on their competition experience. Soldiers assigned to TDA units and ROTC Cadets may coordinate with the AMU S3 for a limited number of loaner weapons.

For additional information, registration, and match bulletin visit the US Army Marksmanship Unit web site at www.usamu.com, or contact the USAMU S3/Chief of Competitions at (706) 545-7841, or michael.behnke@usaac.army.mil or clarence.fedrick@usaac.army.mil.

Link to Match Bulletin:
http://www.usamu.com/OPERATIONS/all-...%20program.pdf

Last edited by Sinister; 11-30-2005 at 20:43.
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Old 03-21-2006, 07:14   #2
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Final Report

March 16, 2006
U S Army

Soldiers take home more than 100 prizes, valuable training from All-Army Small Arms Championships

Generals McNeill, Van Antwerp present awards

By Paula J. Randall Pagán
U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit, Accessions Support Brigade

FORT BENNING, Ga. – Besides the more than 100 trophies, plaques, medals and certificates that were awarded to the Army’s top combat shooters in the All-Army Small Arms Championships, each Soldier left with something even more valuable – advanced marksmanship training. All the competitors in the All-Army Championships received advance marksmanship instruction and training materials to conduct Train-the-Trainer clinics on return to their home station.

Nearly 200 Soldiers from the active Army, Reserve and National Guard, as well as Army ROTC cadets from across the country, spent 11 grueling days of rifle and pistol competition on the ranges of Fort Benning during the matches. The U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit hosted the 2006 Army Rifle and Pistol Championships in conjunction with the U.S. Army Infantry Center March 3 to 14.

“Congratulations on your achievements,” USAMU Commander LTC David J. Liwanag told the crowd of competitors at the awards ceremony March 11. “You can all say you are now better and more proficient military marksmen with the M-16 and M-9 and have doubled or tripled your effective range with Army weapons.”

The All-Army is an advanced combat marksmanship training event and competition, according to Liwanag.

“This is an excellent vehicle for those Soldiers and units reorganized into brigade combat teams and reconnaissance battalions who do not hold MOS 11 (Infantry) or 18 (Special Forces) and cannot attend the U.S. Army Sniper School,” Liwanag said. “The All-Army Matches are designed to raise the shooting proficiency of Soldiers and units across the Army by teaching advanced combat marksmanship techniques using issue rifles and pistols.”

The Soldiers competing in the matches agree. “Our marksmanship has improved drastically, probably 75 percent; we all watched as our confidence and scores increased daily,” said SGT Erin P. Thorman of Battery C, 1st Battalion, 14th Field Artillery Regiment, Fort Sill, Okla. “We learned to move and shoot and shoot from different positions; this would definitely help us in a combat situation.”

Overall Small Arms Championships

An Army Reservist won the top prize and the title of U.S. Army Small Arms Overall Individual Champion in the All-Army Small Arms Championships March 11. All-Reserve Shooting Team member SSG Mark J. Ness of the Small Arms Readiness Group of Forest Park, Ga., won the championship by 27 points over SSG John A. Robertson of the Missouri National Guard.

MAJ Rhonda L. Bright of the Small Arms Readiness Group took third place and received her Distinguished Pistol Shot Badge, making her triple distinguished. Bright received the International Distinguished Badge and the Distinguished Rifleman Badge in 1997; only 14 Soldiers are triple distinguished, having received all three badges.

The Army Small Arms Novice Champion was SPC Shawn A. McKie of the Small Arms Readiness Group. The top drill sergeant was SFC William M. Clarke of Fort Knox, Ky., and the highest finishing cadet was Nicholas K. Roland of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University ROTC.

U.S. Army Accessions Command Commanding General Lt. Gen. Robert L. Van Antwerp presented the awards to the champions at the awards ceremony March 11 at Phillips Range.

“In move, shoot and communicate, we sometimes underestimate the shoot part,” Van Antwerp said. “We all leave here better than when we came. Now go back and train your people with what you’ve learned here.”

Service Pistol Championships

SSG John M. Buol of the Small Arms Readiness Group won the U.S. Army Service Pistol Championship; Robertson took second place and SSG Brent J. Lantagne of the Small Arms Readiness Group was third.

The Service Pistol Open Division Champion was MSG Keith E. Heinauer of Fort Bragg, N.C., and SSG Ryan C. Pavilanis of the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, was the Novice Champion. Bright was the highest finishing female shooter in fifth place overall out of 161 competitors and Roland was the top cadet.

The 1st Army Red Team of the Small Arms Readiness Group won the U.S. Army Service Pistol Team Championship. Shooters were SFC Keith W. Pierson, Ness, Buol and McKie; SFC Sean Hartswick was the team captain and SSG John F. Arcularius was the coach.

The team from the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, took second place; shooters were Pavilanis, SFC Jared N. van Aalst, SSGs. Christopher Carter and Daniel G. Holm and SPCs Isaiah Z. Burkhart and John R. Harrison. The Pennsylvania National Guard Team finished third; shooters were 1LT Joseph W. Cotterino, SFC Kevin W. Bittenbender and SSGs William L. Foster and Michael A. Shea.

Service Rifle Championships

Ness won the U.S. Army Service Rifle Individual Championship, van Aalst took second place, and CPT David T. Cloft of the 3rd Recruiting Brigade of Fort Knox finished third.

In the Service Rifle Open Division, SFC William C. Cary of Headquarters, Small Arms Readiness and Training Section, Nebraska National Guard, was the champion and the Novice Division Champion was PFC Ying Kit Tsui of the 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg.

Bright was the highest finishing female shooter in 10th place overall out of 191 competitors and Cadet Michael A. Mann of Virginia Tech was the highest finishing ROTC cadet.

The Nebraska National Guard Team won the U.S. Army Service Rifle Team Championship; shooters were Cary, MSG Ronald M. Harter of the 2nd Battalion, 209th Regiment, SSG Bradley G. Huston of the 1075th Transportation Company and SGT William M. McClure of the 267th Ordnance Company. The 1st Army Red Team of the Small Arms Readiness Group took second place and the team from the 75th Ranger Regiment finished third.

Long-Range Rifle Championships

Forces Command Commanding General Dan K. McNeill presented the Long-Range awards at a ceremony officially ending the All-Army Small Arms Championships March 14 at Phillips Range.

SFC Tung Nguyen, of Company B, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Bragg, won the U.S. Army Long-Range Sniper Rifle (M24) Class Championships and McKie took the U.S. Army Long-Range Service Rifle (M14) Class Championships. The All-Army Overall Long-Range Rifle Championships was an aggregate of three matches that were fired March 12 to 14 at distances of 600, 800 and 1,000 yards at Maertens Range.

Taking second place in the Overall Long-Range Sniper Class Championships was SPC Michael A. Gerniglia of the Sniper Section of the 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Benning, and MSG Michael A. Pomeroy Jr. of 2nd of the 108th Military Police Battalion, of Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., finished third. Finishing in second and third place in the Long-Range Service Rifle Class were Arcularius and SFC Hubert M. Townsend of the Small Arms Readiness Group.

Nguyen won the 1,000-Yard Sniper Class Long-Range Rifle match, followed by Gerniglia in second place and Cary in third. McKie took the 1,000-Yard Service Rifle Class, SSG William C. Tomlin of Company A, 3rd Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, was second and Arcularius third.

The Sniper Class winner in the 800-Yard competition was Huston; Carter took second place and MAJ Russell S. Miller of Company B, 4th Battalion, 1st Special Warfare Training Group, Fort Bragg was third.

Townsend was the 800-Yard Service Rifle winner; SFC Eric J. Leid, an ROTC instructor at North Georgia College and State University in Dahlonega, Ga., finished in second place and SFC Warren Clark of the Small Arms Readiness Group took third.

CPT David Bowling of Company A, 1st Battalion, 5th Special Forces Group, Fort Campbell, Ky., won the Sniper Class 600-Yard Long-Range Championship; McClure placed second and Nguyen was third. McKie was the Service Rifle Class winner, Arcularius was second and 1LT Will N. Eberle of Company A, 3rd Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division was third.

(Formed in 1956 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower to raise the standards of marksmanship throughout the U.S. Army, the Army Marksmanship Unit is assigned to the Accessions Support Brigade of the U.S. Army Accessions Command. The Marksmanship Unit trains its Soldiers to win competitions and enhances combat readiness through train-the-trainer clinics and small arms research and development. For more information on the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit, contact the Public Affairs Office at (706) 545-5436, paula.pagan@usaac.army.mil or http://www.usarec.army.mil/hq/amu/.)
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Old 03-21-2006, 12:42   #3
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Congrats to all, including Longrange, Gene Econ or whoever else trained these guys.
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Old 03-21-2006, 21:51   #4
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Originally Posted by Roguish Lawyer
Congrats to all, including Longrange, Gene Econ or whoever else trained these guys.
I am very proud of Tung Nguyen. No, I didn't start him out. He started himself out. He got to the 1st SFG around 93 and at that time I was running a Service Rifle Team using some worn out rack grade M-14s. The Group Commander authorized us TDY for competitions in the area and gave us M-118 Special Ball from the Group Class V account for our competition and training.

Tung had a little red Nissan or Toyota pick up with a fiberglass cap on the back. His reloading gear was set up inside of this thing and he reloaded from his pick up truck. He was into guns and shooting before he hit Fort Lewis.

Well, he got involved with our little Service Rifle Team and he shot with us for about a year. We took four or five guys to Wenatchee Washington for a two day shoot. Tung was with us of course. Wenatchee is on the 'East Side' of the Cascades and this range was on a plateau on the east side of the Wentachee river. 200 and 300 were on one range with one set of pits. 600 used another firing line with another set of pits. The 600 yard range shot over a 1/4 mile race track. Look at Wenatchee Washington on Google Earth and you can find this range by looking for a round race track east of the river.

High desert in the spring means wind. When firing at 600, I told the guys to put on eight minutes left wind for their sighter shots and this is one of the most memorable of events as every one of them did so and every one of them scored on their first sighter. Winds were tough. No to full value at 15 - 25. I recall laying in the prone and getting hit by rolling sage brush that went right over me and continued down range. Sage brush does weigh something afterall. Scores sucked but I figure that scoring at all was a success that day.

Tung got into Three Gun and then IPSC real heavy. Am surprised to see he won a Sniper Long Range match as he was heavy into the other disciplines at Lewis.

Tung is functioning on what I call 'The Next Level'. He was totally self motivted to succeed in the shooting disciplines and he dedicated every single second of his being on just this purpose. Few guys have this sort of focus so he functions on a different mental playing field than most.

Gene
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Old 03-22-2006, 19:49   #5
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Tung

Gene, Tung showed up with an SR25 (Mark 11 Mod 0) with all the bells and whistles. During zero and practice in the morning he was shooting the gas gun. In the afternoon for the match he was shooting a bolt gun. I asked him why, and he said, "The gas gun will only hold 9-ring. I need the points."

He shot the Long Range matches with a sniper locker Remington M40X they told him was shot out.

I won't swear on it, but I think he went Distinguished last year with the pistol. He's still trying for his President's Hundred tab.
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Old 03-22-2006, 21:50   #6
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Originally Posted by Sinister
Gene, Tung showed up with an SR25 (Mark 11 Mod 0) with all the bells and whistles. During zero and practice in the morning he was shooting the gas gun. In the afternoon for the match he was shooting a bolt gun. I asked him why, and he said, "The gas gun will only hold 9-ring. I need the points." He shot the Long Range matches with a sniper locker Remington M40X they told him was shot out. I won't swear on it, but I think he went Distinguished last year with the pistol. He's still trying for his President's Hundred tab.
Sinister:

What? An SR-25 that couldn't do better than the 9 ring? Can't be true! I would like to ask him if it was able to shoot more than two rounds without a failure to function.

BTW -- have seen M-24s missing about two inches of their throat due to bore erosion and yet still hold two minutes at 1000 with 118 SB. That isn't too bad at all.

Gene
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Old 03-27-2006, 20:23   #7
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Drill Sergeant Champion

U.S. Army 3d Recruiting Brigade
Building 6580 Arrowhead Drive
Fort Knox, Kentucky 40121-0995

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Release No. 06-04 March 27, 2006 Contact: Christopher Dunne, christopher.dunne@us.army.mil
(502) 626-1042

Fort Knox Marksmen Win at All-Army Championships

FORT KNOX, KY – Sergeant First Class William H. Clark, a Drill Sergeant with Delta Company 2/46 Infantry, became the first-ever All-Army Drill Sergeant Champion, and his Fort Knox team finished 6th overall at the 2006 Army Rifle and Pistol Championships March 3-11 at Fort Benning, Ga.

Overall, nine Fort Knox soldiers participated in the competition, fielding teams representing Fort Knox and 1st Armor Training Brigade.

The Fort Knox team, which also took 3rd place in the Infantry Trophy Match, featured Clark, Staff Sergeant Christopher Murphy of C Company, 3/81st Armor and Captain David Cloft and Captain Troy Brannon, both of 3d Recruiting Brigade.

In addition to the competition, the 1st ATB team of Staff Sergeant George Pickowicz of E Company, 2/46 Infantry; Master Sergeant Carroll Lucas, Staff Sergeant Antonio Salas, Sergeant Joshua Cruz, and Sergeant First Class Benjamin Beleele of C Company 3/81 Armor took advantage of the 64 hours of training that was conducted during the competition.

Competitors received 40 hours of instruction with the M16 and an additional 24 hours training with the M9 pistol, and were awarded a certificate of training from the Army Marksmanship Unit (AMU).

Cloft, who finished 3d overall out of 210 shooters in the rifle competition, quoted AMU Commanding Officer Lieutenant Colonel Dave Liwanag to describe the event: "It’s advanced combat training thinly disguised as a competition."

Clark credited extensive training with helping him to become the first Drill Sergeant Champion. "With 40 hours of training—and a good coach in Captain Cloft—I was able to take 1st place in the novice class at my first rifle competition," he said. "The training was substantial and it was effective, even for a guy like me that’s never actually fired a rifle from 500 yards before." Clark was also awarded an M4 Carbine from the Military Marksmanship Association for his success.

The competition was open to all soldiers from all ranks, branches and military occupational specialties. Competitors ranged from the rank of Private to General Officer, and included an Accessions Command team that featured Lieutenant General Robert L. Van Antwerp.

Soldiers wore full combat gear throughout the competition, including Kevlar helmet and load-bearing equipment, and were required to shoot both the M16 rifle and M9 pistol. "These are rack-grade weapons straight out of an arms room," Clark explained. "There’s no special gunsmithing and weapons aren’t tuned in any way. They’re the same weapons that any soldier would take into combat."

Pistols were fired at distances from seven to 25 yards, while the rifle competition began at 25 yards and extended out to 500. Shooters also had to deal with windy conditions, which provided even more training opportunities. "Through the training, I learned how to read wind and read mirage—and how to successfully negotiate targets at extended ranges in windy, adverse conditions."

The competition is also designed to "train the trainer," Cloft said. "Soldiers learn marksmanship techniques that will help them in combat, and they use what they learn to train their fellow soldiers once they return to their units."

Cloft credited the Fort Knox Engagement Skills Trainer (EST) with helping the Fort Knox teams prepare for competition. "We actually did all our training in the EST," he said. "We never fired a live round before we went down to Fort Benning, so that just shows the advances in technology that we have today—that we can train for an event like this, and go down there and win competitions without ever having fired a live bullet."

"We had tremendous support from the guys at the EST," Cloft said. They opened the facility up to us, taught us how to use the equipment, and gave us free reign for an entire day."

Despite his 3d place overall finish in the rifle competition, Cloft, a member of the Army Reserve Shooting Team, said he enjoyed helping other Fort Knox soldiers prepare for their matches. "I got the most reward out of coaching, and learning how to coach, other soldiers," he explained. "I enjoyed teaching them how to read wind, and teach them some of the things I’ve learned in 20-plus years of competitive shooting."

-www.GoArmy.com-

Photo:

"All-Army Drill Sergeant Champion Sergeant First Class William H. Clark displays the medals and trophy M4 Carbine he was awarded at the 2006 Army Rifle and Pistol Championships at Fort Benning, Ga. Photo by Christopher Dunne, 3d Recruiting Brigade."

Group Photo:

The Fort Knox Marskmanship team finished 3d in the Infantry Trophy Match and 6th overall at the 2006 Army Rifle and Pistol Championships at Fort Benning, Ga. Standing: Sergeant First Class William H. Clark (left) and Staff Sergeant Christopher Murphy (right.) Kneeling: Captain Troy Brannon (left) and Captain David Cloft (right.)
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Old 01-15-2022, 21:15   #8
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I'm resurrecting this old thread to give credit where credit's due, and to encourage anyone eligible to participate in the All Army Small Arms championship.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Econ View Post

Tung is functioning on what I call 'The Next Level'. He was totally self motivted to succeed in the shooting disciplines and he dedicated every single second of his being on just this purpose. Few guys have this sort of focus so he functions on a different mental playing field than most.

Gene

Thank you master Gene Econ for all your mentoring, and for letting me have a role model in SFC Nguyen over a decade ago. I don't think I would have made distinguished, Presidents Hundred, have my name on the All Army NMC trophy in the AMU office, and few other prestigious accolades had it not for Tung's legacy. Thank you master Rick, TS, TR, NDD, Peregrino, et al for setting surgical marksmanship as the starting point. Without such high standard, I would have fallen prey to the self-limiting, "good enough" mindset that I have witnessed among army and law enforcement peers.

I just finished various quals for a gov agency that leans toward paramilitary. Shot the rifle, shotgun, pistol, and secondary pistol quals clean. Shot the low light, no light, unconventional positions ie upside down, and advanced drills clean. I shot the instructors qual clean, then I outshot the instructors.

IMHO, years spent at the All Army Small Arms championship is key to the success. Of course, participating without the correct mindset will not yield much benefit. While comparison is the thief of joy, competition breeds excellence. I got my ass kicked the first year, but I came back, and learned and kept learning from the top shooters with AMU, SMU, guard team, reserve team, even Air Force (yes, AF get to participate. Army can shoot at all navy and earn leg points too)

If you are eligible, please go on TDY for the annual All Army Small Arms. You get to shoot from 5 yards to 500m for entire 5 days. You will see that good is good whether it's race gear or rack grade gear. The CAG SGM who won it few years back used an A2 from a funeral detail. He'd normally use 416. I won the NMC the same year with A2 top and M4 lower as opposed to national match rifle. I then earned the top shot, outshooting all active duty and reserve competitors (who used optics) the next year with an A4 with irons. You also get to figure out how to maintain dexterity at 25 degrees temp, how to keep a fist size pistol group at 35 yards after running 1.5 miles with gear and so on. Various competitors and instructors bring technique from combat, PRS, USPSA, 3 gun, bullseye, High Power etc. It's a buffet for those with an appetite for learning.
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"So we can suffer, and in suffering we know who we are" David Goggins

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Der, der Geld verliert, verliert einiges;
Der, der einen Freund verliert, verliert viel mehr;
Der, der das Vertrauen verliert, verliert alles.

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Old 01-15-2022, 23:45   #9
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I competed in 05' and 06' matches from 5th SFGA. I remember Tung's excellent shooting. We lost him later that same year to friendly fire in Iraq IIRC (25mm from a Bradley into the house he was in). I earned the Army Excellence in Competition Bronze Pistol Badge in 06'

RIP Tung


CD

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Old 01-20-2022, 00:13   #10
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YOU guys are exactly why we had to bring the All-Army back in 2004.

My kid has his Bronze Rifle and Bronze Pistol Badges. He's forwarding me the proposed draft qualification table for the next-generation 6.8 service rifle.

100 yards, 200 yards (with movers), 300, and 600, all on electronic LOMAH targets.

Which means the Army can't afford to build them, and legacy KD ranges can't take them due to the downrange bat-wing drawing distances.

Some shit never changes.
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Old 01-22-2022, 12:08   #11
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YOU guys are exactly why we had to bring the All-Army back in 2004.

My kid has his Bronze Rifle and Bronze Pistol Badges. He's forwarding me the proposed draft qualification table for the next-generation 6.8 service rifle.

100 yards, 200 yards (with movers), 300, and 600, all on electronic LOMAH targets.

Which means the Army can't afford to build them, and legacy KD ranges can't take them due to the downrange bat-wing drawing distances.

Some shit never changes.
oh wow, I did not know you were instrumental in bringing those matches. Thank you Sinister! I wouldnt be where I am at today without those. The demand to prepare for murphy and adjust quickly on the run is unparalleled IMHO. I did wish that by the time I started to win matches the All Army still had gucci gear prizes like in 06 and 07 Not sure when it stopped. Something to do with conflict of interest so I understand.

Have the kid continue blasting his way towards being distinguished! While in the military EIC is an alien concept to many, once he is out in civilian among top tier lead slinger that distinguished title is an instant creds and builds rapport quickly.
I was 10 points away from rifle (and double) distinguished when I went overseas in '17. Makes me want to rejoin reserve or national guard now so I can attend All Army again and finish the job
IIRC, there are two leg matches to earn points at All Army. The EIC rifle and NMC rifle courses. If anyone is at master or above qualification in High Power, one is almost guaranteed to get points (unless AMU or SMU happens to send dozens of their guys to get points too!)
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"we also rejoice in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope" Rom. 5:3-4

"So we can suffer, and in suffering we know who we are" David Goggins

"Aide-toi, Dieu t'aidera " Jehanne, la Pucelle

Der, der Geld verliert, verliert einiges;
Der, der einen Freund verliert, verliert viel mehr;
Der, der das Vertrauen verliert, verliert alles.

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Old 01-22-2022, 22:54   #12
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If I remember correctly your leg points would still go toward Distinguished (Civilian).

CD
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Old 01-28-2022, 00:06   #13
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If I remember correctly your leg points would still go toward Distinguished (Civilian).

CD
Absolutely true, George -- and although I have the guns and gadgets I suck at one-handed pistol. I'm stuck at 2 Bronzes.

The kid has found civilian combat matches in Colorado, hosted by retired Montana Guard guys. They start at 600, go to 500, 400, 300, and 200 (where they have snaps) and 100 (where they have movers!), then pistol at 25 to 10 yards.

We didn't even have that at Benning, the Guard Championships, or at the JSOC/Unit matches.

He shoots a rack-grade M4 with ACOG and a Beretta, and spanks civilians with pricey custom bolt guns and AR-10s.
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