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Old 09-29-2007, 15:38   #106
Onuma
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Yessir I saw that. The runner was no joke! Still, it doesn't beat Mr. Bond busting through that drywall. Casino Royale was my favorite Bond flick yet.

As for myself, it's not a "new" workout routine for many of the QPs and others here, but I'm prepping myself for SFAS in the spring. I figure the longer I train, the better off I'll be. Rucking regularly, running on and off roads, APFT improvement, swimming in uniform & boots, jumping rope (eventually w/ wrist weights) for some serious cardio, a regular weight lifting routine, plyometric workouts, and other forms of cardiovascular and muscular strength & endurance exercises. There's no turning back now! This site has been instrumental in my motivation and direction to get this done, so thanks to all of the posters here for getting me off my butt and outside!
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Old 09-29-2007, 16:18   #107
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Rehab:

Trying to strengthen the tendons,ligaments and muscles in my left leg before the orthopedic surgeon decides to go with a knee replacement.It wasn't the number of jumps,it was the number of bad landings...Regards,tom kelly
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Old 09-29-2007, 18:37   #108
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Did a little of this last fall, but I'm back to sprinkling my varied workout program with tabata intervals for push-ups, pull-ups, crunches and dumbell lifts (start with a biceps curl to front of shoulders, rotate wrists so palms face forward, execute a military press, lower back to shoulder height, rotate wrists so palms face you, and complete lowering part of biceps curl). Not all on the same day, of course...I don't want my wife collecting on my life insurance just yet.
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Old 10-02-2007, 13:36   #109
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Have you tried tabata thrusters? I've heard they're great fun.



Tabata front squats are a goodie too.

http://www.google.com/search?q=cache...ient=firefox-a

- Derek
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Old 10-02-2007, 17:08   #110
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Question

I've never done tabata, although I have read about it. I'm not that dynamic anymore.
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Old 10-02-2007, 20:40   #111
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Ive started adding barefoot running to my weekly workout. Currently Im only doing about a mile or more per week with a goal of getting up to more than half my weekly mileage. I run about 30 mpw in shoes.

The goal is to strengthen the muscles, ligaments,and tendons in my feet and LEs, and improve my stride.

I dont have plans to do road races barefoot but I wont rule it out-
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Old 10-02-2007, 20:49   #112
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Ive started adding barefoot running to my weekly workout. Currently Im only doing about a mile or more per week with a goal of getting up to more than half my weekly mileage. I run about 30 mpw in shoes.

The goal is to strengthen the muscles, ligaments,and tendons in my feet and LEs, and improve my stride.

I dont have plans to do road races barefoot but I wont rule it out-
Awesome!

Sounds like you're starting slow enough which is good.

I picked up some Vibram Five-Finger sprints for near-barefoot running, and, after a couple weeks of regular walking in them, figured I was good to do some sprint work.

6x 400 meter intervals and three weeks later, I still can't run . Had some pain in my 4th metatarsal, so I'm resting my feet for another week to avoid a stress fracture.

NDD: Ah, understood. Thanks for the response. Do you do them as part of a circuit, or stand-alone? Thrusters hurt...in my opinion, their conditioning potency is equivalent to Ross Enamait's burpee.

- Derek

Last edited by S3Project; 10-02-2007 at 20:53.
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Old 10-03-2007, 07:12   #113
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I hope you guys remember the difference between training hard and breaking yourself.

Muscles can be made stronger with good training, joints and bones will be damaged by unnecessary gut-checks.

When you hit 50 or so, you will know the difference, but by then, it may be too late.

Running barefoot in sand may be a good tool. Running barefoot on pavement is definitely not, unless you anticipate a life span of 30 years or less.

TR
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Old 10-03-2007, 13:15   #114
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Originally Posted by The Reaper View Post
I hope you guys remember the difference between training hard and breaking yourself.

Muscles can be made stronger with good training, joints and bones will be damaged by unnecessary gut-checks.

When you hit 50 or so, you will know the difference, but by then, it may be too late.

Running barefoot in sand may be a good tool. Running barefoot on pavement is definitely not, unless you anticipate a life span of 30 years or less.

TR
Thank you TR. If you do not mind, I would like to explain, briefly, why I am running on the forefoot.

To clarify, I'm really trying to prevent injury by switching from an unnatural heel-based strike to a more fluid and bio-mechanically sound forefoot strike.

I will paste a selection from Olympian Gordon Pirie's (free) online e-book, "Running Fast and Injury Free"

"The champion runners, who all have to run correctly, do not make much noise when their foot lands. When the fastest runner runs, he is very quiet on his feet. Excessive foot noise indicates that you are striking the ground instead of caressing it. You are dissipating energy which should be utilized in propelling yourself forward. This shows bad timing. The force to drive you forward
should only be applied after the foot has settled on the ground completely. Striking the ground, especially with the heel, causes trauma and makes the runner susceptible to injury.

The nerves conveying tactile sensation from the foot are predominantly located in the forefoot. When the ball of the foot touches the ground, these nerves “alert” the muscles of the legs, which involuntarily react to absorb the shock of landing. If a person hits the ground heel-first, this reaction of the leg muscles will be considerably less, and consequently more shock will be
experienced at the point of contact of the foot, and be transmitted to the bones of the leg. This jarring is guaranteed eventually to cause injury to the ankle, knee and/or hip joints.

It is therefore important that a runner lands on the forward portion of the foot, with the knee slightly bent, and with the foot placed beneath the body. By doing so, the runner will make use of the body's own efficient shock absorbers - the arch of the foot, the calf muscles, and the quadriceps muscles in the thighs - and in this way reduce the stress experienced by the heel,
shin bone, knee joint, thigh bone and hip joint. It is these areas which are stressed the most when the heel strikes the ground."


(Courtesy of http://www.gordonpirie.com/ )

In any case, I just mean to explain that I am not trying to be stupid and look like a stud - but rather, I am trying to strengthen my feet and run in a style conducive to longevity. I was terribly foolish by doing too much forefoot running, too soon, and I wholly concede that point.

I apologize if I have rambled too much!

Have a good day.

Regards,
Derek
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Old 10-03-2007, 15:23   #115
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Bear in mind, there's a difference between sprinting form and distance form. When you run slower, you're not leaning forward, and you're not going to strike with a different part of your foot. Point being, you're right that you shouldn't be reaching with your heels, but neither should you be jogging on the balls of your feet as if you were sprinting.

To develop a feel the difference, try running about 200-400 meters smoothly throttling up from a walk to a full sprint and then back down. You should feel your center of gravity, your body lean, and your foot strike move forward and back as you change speed.

If you want to do something to strengthen your joints. I'd suggest you think about taking up two-man beach volleyball (assuming there's a decent place to play near you, by that I mean somewhere with guys who play at a high tempo). Explosive movements in multiple, unanticipated directions in soft sand is the best way I know to strengthen joints and improve explosive movement. As a bonus it will be good for your hand-eye coordination and a good way to meet chicks.
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Old 10-03-2007, 19:43   #116
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Although I enjoy running, burpees are my favorite cardio exercise.
I like burpees as well, although flying burpees have a special placei my heart.
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Old 10-03-2007, 20:05   #117
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I like burpees. Alot. The studs don't seem to care for them much - probably has something to do with the vest.

What's a flying burpee?
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Somewhere a True Believer is training to kill you. He is training with minimal food or water, in austere conditions, training day and night. The only thing clean on him is his weapon and he made his web gear. He doesn't worry about what workout to do - his ruck weighs what it weighs, his runs end when the enemy stops chasing him. This True Believer is not concerned about 'how hard it is;' he knows either he wins or dies. He doesn't go home at 17:00, he is home.
He knows only The Cause.

Still want to quit?
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Old 10-03-2007, 20:19   #118
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I hope you guys remember the difference between training hard and breaking yourself. TR
No over training gut check here Sir.

Just some easy, gentle aerobic running without shoes. If it works for me Ill build it up but even then I dont plan to race or do speed work etc barefoot (at least for the near future)-
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Old 10-03-2007, 22:45   #119
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I've never done tabata, although I have read about it. I'm not that dynamic anymore.
They don't have to be overly dynamic, brother. So long as you continue doing whatever exercise you're doing for the full 20 sec, and its not a really slow movement, you'll get the hurts-so-good effect.
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Old 10-04-2007, 09:05   #120
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I've been training running "almost" barefoot for a couple of months now. Those Vibram five fingers shoes are just enough to protect your foot from a stray pebble or small shard of glass, etc, but still convey the feeling of barefoot running.

When your technique is sound, you are prone to far fewer injuries and you're actually faster with more endurance than running traditionally with sneakers. I used to be able to run 6 minute miles barefoot, but running with shoes has ever been difficult for me.

Technology is great, but occasionally it's a one-step-forward, two-steps-back kinda thing. Footwear can be excellent for protection, but not always as good for performance, imho.
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