Old 01-28-2004, 14:06   #1
Razor
Quiet Professional
 
Razor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Colorado Springs
Posts: 4,489
Ruck Designs

Top Loading Rucks
Top loading rucksacks work exactly like they sound—the main opening for the bag is at the top. There is usually some sort of drawstring closure to secure the wide opening, and a flap to keep out debris, help repel water, etc. The standard issue ALICE rucksack is considered a top loader.

The advantages of a top-loader are:
  • They have a good deal of circumferential strength due to a solid fabric design, so you can really ‘stuff’ it if need be
  • With only one opening at the top, there’s little chance items falling out, even if the main opening isn’t secured (gravity helps keep things in place)
  • If your “closure” system for the top opening (the drawstring) fails, it’s generally easy to field-repair
  • You can sit the rucksack on it’s ‘bottom’ when accessing the main opening, which keeps the suspension off the ground (a real benefit when the ground is wet or muddy)

The disadvantages of a top-loader are:
  • Items near the bottom or sides are hard to access very quickly, so essential items must be kept near the top, where they’re more likely to fall out
  • To get to items along the sides or at the bottom, you either have to dig for them (usually finding them by feel) or unpack your rucksack, retrieve the item, then repack

Some top loaders have other openings along the sides (such as the Kifaru EMR/MMR) or at the bottom (such as the CFP-90) to provide greater access to items within the bag. However, any additional openings will add a degree of weakness to the bag’s circumferential strength. Additionally, these other openings are often secured by a zipper, which, if it fails, is virtually impossible to field repair. To address this concern, many manufacturers add straps and side-release buckles. While this can help prevent zipper failure by reducing the stresses on the zipper, they add another degree of complexity to the simple design of the top-loader.


Panel Loading Rucks
Panel loading rucksacks generally have a three-sided, zippered flap that serves as both the main opening of the rucksack and as the outermost (farthest from the user’s back) wall of the rucksack. This design is very well suited for users that need to quickly and easily find and access items in any part of the rucksack, whether it’s loaded on the top, sides or bottom. Many medical rucksacks are panel loaders because of this feature.

Some advantages of panel loaders are:
  • Quick, easy access to the entire contents of the bag
  • The full visibility afforded by the opened main panel makes finding items very quick and simple (a good thing in a sudden rainstorm, or during a medical emergency)
  • Its very easy to use some kind of divider to organize equipment in the ruck

Some disadvantages of panel loaders are:
  • A zipper normally secures the main panel, which is inherently weaker (and nearly impossible to field repair) than solid fabric, limiting the ‘stuffing’ capacity of the rucksack
  • Before moving, the main closure must be secure, or items can fall out
  • Items packed in the bag—especially fabric items—can get jammed in the zipper while opening or closing it
  • If the zipper fails, one must rely on straps and side release buckles (if they are part of the design) to keep the main panel closed; this method may still leave unsecured gaps in the panel through which items inside may fall and become lost
  • To keep items from falling out when the main panel is opened, you need to put the suspension-side against the ground, which can get messy and uncomfortable when the ground is wet, muddy or contaminated (biohazard, chemical, etc)

The panel loading design is normally limited to rucksacks with a capacity of 4000c.i. or less to reduce stress on the main closure system.

Last edited by Razor; 01-28-2004 at 14:08.
Razor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2004, 18:36   #2
Valhal
Auxiliary
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Idaho
Posts: 89
Is there a SF SOP for packing a ruck? What in where info. I want to start training with a packed ruck like I will use in SFAS.

Thanks,
Mark
Valhal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2004, 15:11   #3
Surgicalcric
Quiet Professional
 
Surgicalcric's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Wherever my ruck finds itself
Posts: 2,972
Valhal:

45 lbs of sand weighs the same as 45 lbs of equipment.

There is no science to packing your ruck, or atleast none that I have found. There is a packing list of things you will be required to carry in your ruck, but from what I have been told, by many of the experienced guys here, it will be up to you to get everything required into the ruck and make sure your ruck is atleast the minimum weight.

Be sure the heaviest items are packed closest to your back and weight is distributed evenly left-to-right. Pack your spare socks and t-shirts in ziplock bags at the top so they are easily accessible during wellness checks and place your poncho in the space at the bottom of the ruckframe so its easily accessible while moving or without removing your pack. When on long movements keep food consisting of simply carbohydrates (apple sauce, graham crackers, etc) in your bellows pockets of your BDU's so you can eat while you walk.

HTH,

JD
__________________
"It's better to die on your feet than live on your knees."

"Its not who I am underneath, but what I do that defines me" -Batman

"There are no obstacles, only opportunities for excellence."- NousDefionsDoc
Surgicalcric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2004, 17:07   #4
eggroll
Guerrilla
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Rocky Mountains
Posts: 199
may seem a bit out of place, but inspect the interior seams of your ruck. Check the stress points - at the lower frame straps and the top frame envelope.

Do a surface check fo abrasions or holes that shouldnt be there. check the buckles for bends or cracks.

Check the QR buckles on the shoulder straps too.

While you humpin all this gear, you really dont want the bag itself blowing out on you.

Keep heavier stuff closer to your center of gravity - and do make SURE that the pack is load balanced before putting it on.

EGG
__________________
EGG sends
eggroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2004, 17:17   #5
NousDefionsDoc
Quiet Professional
 
NousDefionsDoc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: LA
Posts: 1,653
Quote:
Originally posted by eggroll
may seem a bit out of place, but inspect the interior seams of your ruck. Check the stress points - at the lower frame straps and the top frame envelope.

Do a surface check fo abrasions or holes that shouldnt be there. check the buckles for bends or cracks.

Check the QR buckles on the shoulder straps too.

While you humpin all this gear, you really dont want the bag itself blowing out on you.

Keep heavier stuff closer to your center of gravity - and do make SURE that the pack is load balanced before putting it on.

EGG
Good advice. Never forget the PMCS
__________________
Somewhere a True Believer is training to kill you. He is training with minimal food or water, in austere conditions, training day and night. The only thing clean on him is his weapon and he made his web gear. He doesn't worry about what workout to do - his ruck weighs what it weighs, his runs end when the enemy stops chasing him. This True Believer is not concerned about 'how hard it is;' he knows either he wins or dies. He doesn't go home at 17:00, he is home.
He knows only The Cause.

Still want to quit?
NousDefionsDoc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2004, 00:19   #6
TF Kilo
Guerrilla
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Nevada
Posts: 213
Quote:
Originally posted by Surgicalcric
Valhal:

45 lbs of sand weighs the same as 45 lbs of equipment.

There is no science to packing your ruck, or atleast none that I have found. There is a packing list of things you will be required to carry in your ruck, but from what I have been told, by many of the experienced guys here, it will be up to you to get everything required into the ruck and make sure your ruck is atleast the minimum weight.

Be sure the heaviest items are packed closest to your back and weight is distributed evenly left-to-right. Pack your spare socks and t-shirts in ziplock bags at the top so they are easily accessible during wellness checks and place your poncho in the space at the bottom of the ruckframe so its easily accessible while moving or without removing your pack. When on long movements keep food consisting of simply carbohydrates (apple sauce, graham crackers, etc) in your bellows pockets of your BDU's so you can eat while you walk.

HTH,

JD
That right there is the science to packing a ruck. Make sure it's waterproof.. wet junk weighs a heck of alot more than dry, and once it's wet the only thing it's gonna do is become a science experiment...
TF Kilo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
ID this ruck Razor Professional Gear 15 06-11-2004 23:23
Packing your ruck.... D9 (RIP) Special Forces Fieldcraft 11 02-25-2004 14:15
Ruck Frame Considerations Razor Professional Gear 11 01-29-2004 03:18
Rucking Advice The Reaper Special Forces Assessment & Selection 0 01-23-2004 20:52



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:15.



Copyright 2004-2022 by Professional Soldiers ®
Site Designed, Maintained, & Hosted by Hilliker Technologies