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-   -   Venezuela, a month left at best? (http://www.professionalsoldiers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50894)

tonyz 08-01-2018 10:45

Quote:

Originally Posted by bblhead672 (Post 644903)
What Venezuela needs is the US to export a few million leftist SJW's down there to straighten the government out. One way tickets of course. Any SJW's who survive may reapply for entry back into US after passing citizenship exam. :D

I like it...for all who aspire to be a Lefist...travel to Cuba or Venezuela...weather isn’t bad...Michael MoorON says healthcare rocks...system is already in place and just needs your “brilliant” ideas.

rsdengler 08-01-2018 12:10

Quote:

Originally Posted by Badger52 (Post 644904)
"Your number is 3,176,483. Now serving #4...number FOUR?"

Now serving number.........4.5......LOL......:p

Joker 08-01-2018 15:03

Quote:

Originally Posted by rsdengler (Post 644909)
Now serving number.........4.5......LOL......:p

Link


:D

Badger52 08-01-2018 16:52

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joker (Post 644914)

No linkee.

PSM 08-01-2018 17:20

Quote:

Originally Posted by Badger52 (Post 644916)
No linkee.

It's there, you just have to know how to get around TS's YT ban. ;)

Joker 08-01-2018 18:38

Quote:

Originally Posted by Badger52 (Post 644916)
No linkee.

Replace the **** with that video viewing website name.

Badger52 08-01-2018 19:40

Ahh, roger. Gracias.

rsdengler 08-02-2018 04:55

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joker (Post 644920)
Replace the **** with that video viewing website name.

Am I "computer challenged", or should the link be a NASA video?....LOL.......:p Or am I number 4.6?......Ha.....

Joker 08-02-2018 10:53

Quote:

Originally Posted by Joker (Post 644920)
Replace the **** with that video viewing website name.

Quote:

Originally Posted by rsdengler (Post 644926)
Am I "computer challenged", or should the link be a NASA video?....LOL.......:p Or am I number 4.6?......Ha.....

See the quote above...

Badger52 08-19-2018 05:19

And now the Petro
 
Petro CRYPTOCURRENCY to become official currency alongside bolivar

Quote:

VENEZUELA is to make its homegrown cryptocurrency, the Petro, an official currency alongside the bolivar as the South American nation continues to battle hyperinflation which has left it on the brink of economic collapse.

President Nicolas Maduro announced state-owned oil giant Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) will begin using the digital token from Monday, August 20.

In a television address, the Venezuelan leader revealed the country would soon have two units of currency: the digital Petro and the ‘sovereign bolivar’, ABC International reports.

He said his government would also introduce a new salary and pricing systems which will be pegged to the cryptocurrency.

The announcement comes as the oil-rich nation grapples with hyperinflation which some forecasters have warned will soon hit one million percent.
Rest of story w/photos here.

Directly linking a crypto currency that isn't legal in the US against the dollar to an already-failed hard currency of your country... what could go wrong? (or maybe it's 'wrong-er')
:munchin

Ret10Echo 08-19-2018 06:43

Quote:

Originally Posted by Badger52 (Post 645226)
Petro CRYPTOCURRENCY to become official currency alongside bolivar



Rest of story w/photos here.

Directly linking a crypto currency that isn't legal in the US against the dollar to an already-failed hard currency of your country... what could go wrong? (or maybe it's 'wrong-er')
:munchin

More proof that Socialism works

lindy 08-19-2018 06:45

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ret10Echo (Post 645227)
More proof that Socialism works

I thought people support Socialism so the don’t have to work.:D

Team Sergeant 08-19-2018 11:19

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ret10Echo (Post 645227)
More proof that Socialism works



Petro CRYPTOCURRENCY to become official currency alongside bolivar
The accepted currency of drug trafficking cartels worldwide.

CRYPTOCURRENCY, 1% legit uses, 99% criminal use. Perfect for corrupt socialist communist countries worldwide.

tonyz 09-12-2018 08:33

The progressives here should spend a few years down south and see if their “elite” ideas can actually fix this mess - before they continue to foist their socialist ideas on the rest of the USA.

U.S. charges Venezuela's socialist elites with stealing even the food

September 12, 2018
American Thinker
Monica Showalter

For socialists, socialism isn't about equality: It's about getting rich.

And as Venezuelans grow hungry from the economic mismanagement of socialist policies, whether through the devaluation of their currency, or the price and currency controls that have triggered shortages, losing an average of 19 pounds in the ordeal, sure enough, Venezuela's socialists have found a new way to get rich. According to the BBC:

The US has accused Venezuela's government of stealing from a state-run food programme while its own people go hungry.

Marshall Billingslea, a US treasury official, said Venezuelan government officials were over-charging for food.

He said corruption by President Nicolás Maduro and his inner circle had "impoverished millions" of Venezuelans.

The Venezuelan government blames US sanctions for the food shortages the country is experiencing.

Mr Billingslea, who is the Assistant Secretary for Terrorist Financing at the US treasury department, accused President Maduro of "rapacious corruption" and of operating "a kleptocracy".

Gad. Stealing from the starving. Always gotta get some, is that it? Funny how socialism always seems to lead to stealing, while all the while, its proponents, such as Bernie Sanders, call it 'sharing.'

I have not found any information about this so-called state food program, but there were some when I visited Venezuela in late 2005. One was called Mercal, which was put in place to provide discount foods to the poor because the small local groceries were supposedly charging too much. The 25% to 50% state-store discount put those mom-and-pops out of business, leaving just the government food programs, run by Venezuela's military. With their monopoly established, the stealing opportunity was there, given that there would be no need to satisfy customers, either through price or availability of goods.

Which would match the U.S. official's description of Chavista socialist elites overcharging for food while the country starves.

Chavista socialist elites have always been famous for their stealing. The U.S. is currently investigating massive amounts of thievery around Miami from Venezuela's state oil company, according to many reports. Like any bank robbers, the greediest ones go where the money is. But downwind, the Chavista elites steal, too, because socialism is essentially about thievery; I mean, 'redistribution.' They do it with votes, too.

What we see here is a particularly horrific example of the rapacious nature of socialism. They steal even the food from the starving people. As President Trump said at the United Nations recently:
Venezuela's socialism hasn't failed because it wasn't properly implemented. It failed because it was faithfully implemented.

Obviously, stealing does that. Are you listening, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez?


https://www.americanthinker.com/blog...#ixzz5QtcTXFgQ

Volunteer 11-15-2018 15:13

To keep the unruly mobs in check, help from China
 
A new Venezuelan ID, created with China's ZTE, tracks citizen behavior.

https://www.reuters.com/investigates...venezuela-zte/

miclo18d 11-28-2018 06:10

A very well written history brief of Venezuela’s decent into madness. The last paragraph is bent into a pro 2nd amendment view. https://ammo.com/articles/venezuela-...nvy-demagogues

This should be required reading to understand the glories of the “workers paradise”; it’ll never happen.

Quote:

Venezuela and the Paradox of Plenty: A Cautionary Tale About Oil, Envy, and Demagogues

As Venezuela falls into the abyss of economic collapse – the economy has halved in five years, a contraction worse than the Great Depression or the Spanish Civil War – a simplistic narrative in the American press has formed, which starts with the Chavez regime seizing control of the country in 1998. *

(The charismatic populist Hugo Chavez is, after all, the leader most Americans are familiar with when talking about Venezuela, as he made worldwide headlines with his 2006 UN speech where he called U.S. President Bush "a devil" while celebrities like Sean Penn and Michael Moore cheered him on.)

In the 1950s, Venezuela enjoyed its place among the top 10 richest countries on a per-capita basis. How has it turned into a country where more than 2.3 million of its 30 million citizens have fled since 2015 due to starvation? A toxic mix of creeping interventionism, institutional decay, private property seizures, irresponsible fiat monetary policy, and wide-ranging corruption are the main culprits. But Chavez wasn’t the instigator of this mess; the story goes back much further and should serve as a cautionary tale about one country’s faithful adherence to the tenets of socialism to the bitter end.

The Early Venezuela Economy: From Backwater to Boom Country
Gaining its independence from Spain in 1811, Venezuela started out as one of Latin America’s most politically unstable countries, remaining that way until the early 20th century. During this period, Venezuela was primarily a coffee exporter, but the game changed when its first oil field was completed in 1914. From that point forward, Venezuela went from a regional backwater to Latin America’s richest country in a matter of decades.

Oil reserves weren’t the only factor behind Venezuela’s economic success. Property rights were respected, regulations were low, sound money was the norm (Venezuela did not have a central bank unitil 1939) and the country was able to attract skilled immigrants from Italy, Portugal, and Spain. These factors helped catapult Venezuela to one of the richest countries in the world by the 1950s. Some estimates had Venezuela in the top 10 richest countries on a per capita GDP basis.
Venezuela Transitions into Military Rule

Interestingly, Venezuela was governed by numerous military dictatorships during this time period. Juan Vicente Gómez, who helped consolidate the modern-day Venezuelan state, ruled from 1908 until his death in 1935. Although Gómez had a tyrannical reputation for his suppression of free speech and other basic civil liberties, he did not tamper with the Venezuelan economy. After Gómez’s death, democracy advocates struggled to reform the government for nearly 15 years. Despite the democratic activists’ efforts, Venezuela reverted back to military rule in 1948, under the tutelage of Marcos Peréz Jiminéz.

Under the regime of Peréz Jiminéz, Venezuela received international praise for its economic performance. That being said, the Peréz Jiminéz regime did experiment with certain interventionist policies such as the creation of the state-owned steel company SIDOR and the government’s encroachment into the hospitality industry. But these interventionist policies would pale in comparison to the welfare statism pursued in the following decades.

Enter Democracy and President Rómulo Betancourt

Nevertheless, trouble was brewing. Peréz *Jiminéz was no saint, and turned to repression to quell opposition to his regime. Peréz Jiminéz's heavy-handed responses to protests generated a strong opposition movement from leftist activists. It did not help that the business class in Venezuela was also growing weary of Peréz Jiminéz's spending programs. These factors turned into the perfect storm in 1958. A coup organized by high-ranking military officials and the Patriotic Junta – a political coalition made up of the Democratic Action, COPEI (Christian Democrats), and the Communist Party of Venezuela – succeeded in toppling Peréz Jiminéz.

Once Venezuela rid itself of Peréz Jiminéz, the country began its transition to democracy. One of the renowned leaders of Venezuela’s democracy movement was Rómulo Betancourt, who eventually became the country’s president in 1959. In previous decades, Betancourt made a name for himself as a left-wing student activist. His political rabble-rousing against then dictator Juan Vicente Gómez would get him exiled from the country. Betancourt was a former member of the Communist Party while exiled in Costa Rica. And although he eventually renounced his Communist approach, Betancourt still believed in a massive state role in the economy.

Betancourt’s socialist lite vision was reflected in the Venezuelan Constitution of 1961, which set the foundation for a vast series of government interventions – labor rights, land reform, and oil industry regulation. In his article, Hugo Chavez Against the Backdrop of Venezuelan History, economist Hugo Faria details the extent of Betancourt’s government interventions:

“One of Betancourt’s first decisions as president was to undertake a land reform aimed at breaking up large landholdings (latifundia). New “owners” of the redistributed land received titles of use, but not full ownership rights. Betancourt’s government established a central planning office called CORDIPLAN, adapted to a mixed economy..

...Betancourt devalued the currency, raising the bolivar price of the dollar from 3.30 to 4.50, and implemented exchange controls. He also increased overall government expenditures, especially consumption outlays. His government tripled the income tax rate, raising it from 12 percent to 36 percent, made the tax more complex, and introduced numerous graduated brackets. Years of successive fiscal deficits made their first appearance and then became a hallmark of Venezuela’s public finance.”

Although Betancourt’s government did not do much damage off the bat, it sowed the seeds for much bigger reforms. These reforms came into fruition in the 1970s, when Venezuela had its first oil bonanza.

The Rise of Petro State Social Democracy

When President Carlos Andrés Pérez came into power in 1974, he ushered in an unprecedented era of government growth. At the time, the world was going through a profound energy crisis, from which Pérez sought to profit. Like any sympathizer of big government, Pérez channeled petroleum rents to finance his extravagant spending program. The nationalization of Venezuela’s oil industry was a crucial step in consolidating Pérez’s vision.

The government did not stop there. Fashioning itself as an all-powerful steward of economic affairs, the Venezuelan government also nationalized the iron industry during the Pérez era. Additionally, the Venezuelan state played the crony capitalist game of choosing winners and losers in the market. Protectionism also became entrenched during this period, as tariffs were placed on a wide array of goods and non-tariff barriers such as import quotas were enacted.

However, no government spending binge is complete without an easy money policy. The Pérez administration made sure to politicize its Central Bank by effectively nationalizing it. From there, Venezuelan politicians had a printing press and a petroleum revenue piggy bank to finance their government largesse.

The Beginning of a Lost Decade

Once the 1980s arrived, Venezuela was drunk on debt and was forced to make several tough calls. Pérez’s successor, Luis Herrera Campins, stated that he inherited a “mortgaged” country.

And in 1983, the first major domino fell. Venezuela was forced to devalue its currency during Black Friday. Once Latin America’s strongest currency, the Bolívar’s 1983 devaluation opened the floodgates for subsequent monetary malfeasances.

Institutional inertia remained strong in Venezuela as the Herrera administration responded with exchange controls to curtail capital flight. Venezuela’s system of multi-tiered exchange rates would fall under the purview of the “Differential Exchange Rate Regime” (RECADI) agency. Following the Herrera administration, Jaime Lusinchi’s presidency was riddled with scandals. Members of the political class profited off of Venezuela’s exchange rate boondoggle through sweetheart deals and favorable exchange rates that would otherwise not exist in a functioning market economy.

Public outrage and political pressure forced the Venezuelan government to abolish the RECADI exchange control system. However, RECADI’s legacy would be etched in the Venezuelan political economy. It served as an inspiration to the Commision for the Administration of Currency Exchange (CADIVI) and its successor, the National Center for Foreign Commerce (CENCOEX) – two hallmarks of United Socialist Party of Venezuela’s reign throughout the 2000s.

What looked like an unstoppable growth miracle, Venezuela faced its first decade of economic stagnation during the 1980s.

The IMF’s Mixed Bag of Reforms

Like any ambitious politician, Carlos Andrés Pérez re-entered the political scene in the late 1980s. His presidential campaign promised a return to the 1970s bonanza. But once in office, *Pérez would be surrounded with several uncomfortable truths. Not only was Venezuela heavily indebted due to its extravagant spending programs, but it was non-competitive at the international level thanks to its protectionist policies. Furthermore, Venezuela’s golden goose, oil, could not bail it out thanks to the low prices throughout the 1980s.

miclo18d 11-28-2018 06:11

Part II

Quote:

Pérez would immediately turn to the International Monetary Fund for help. The IMF’s suggestions were ultimately a mixed bag. On the positive side, they encouraged tariff reductions and privatization of state-run industries. That being said, the government could not tame inflation, implemented a value-added tax on top of the income tax system, and did not even bother to privatize its state-owned oil company.

Nevertheless, the tariff reductions and privatizations gave the economy some breathing room. But Pérez’s market reforms weren’t without political pushback. In fact, his attempts to restore some semblance of normalcy to the Venezuelan economy would lead to his undoing.

Hugo Chavez and Political Breakdown

Unfortunately, in the middle of these reforms, political drama began to rear its ugly head. Pérez’s own party, Democratic Action (AD), was not a fan of Pérez’s economic program. Fearing that his economic liberalization schemes would undermine their political privileges, they worked tirelessly behind the scenes to stop Pérez’s reforms.

Additionally, AD had plenty of help on the streets. An assortment of leftist groups took to the streets and protested Pérez’s “austerity” policies. These protests snowballed into the infamous “Caracazo” incident of 1989. In this instance, the Venezuelan government put down a series of protests in the capital city of Caracas, leaving hundreds dead.

Even with this repressive incident, radical groups continued to mobilize throughout the country. One group that stood out was then Lieutenant Colonel Hugo Chávez´s organization, Revolutionary Bolivarian Movement-200 (MBR-200). Chávez exploited the ever-growing political disarray by organizing an anti-government movement within the Venezuelan military. The MBR-200 attempted to flex its muscles in 1992, with two failed coup attempts.

As punishment for his failed uprising, Chávez was imprisoned. Nevertheless, the damage to the bipartisan model had already been done. As social unrest snowballed, the Pérez administration gradually lost the public’s trust. Pérez’s fate was sealed when he was impeached for corruption charges in 1992.

By then, the Punto Fijo model had completely collapsed. The Venezuela of the 1950s to 1970s – an era of robust growth and political cohesion – soon became a distant memory. The Punto Fijo model then gave way to a new coalition, Convergence (Convergencia), of disgruntled political parties. Headed by President Rafael Caldera, Convergence attempted to reassemble the broken pieces of Venezuela’s political machine.
In terms of policy, Rafael Caldera maintained Venezuela’s statist model of economic organization. Caldera continued implementing certain lukewarm IMF measures, but inflation raged on, peaking at 100 percent in 1996. Structural problems like privatizing Venezuela’s national oil industry were never addressed. Big business’ cozy relationship with the government also remained intact.

The Failure of Soft Socialism

No matter how apologists of Venezuela’s democratic era (1958-1998) slice it, its political class delivered sub-optimal results. From 1958 to 1998, Venezuela’s per capita GDP growth was a disappointin -0.13 percent. In essence, Venezuela grew poorer during the Punto Fijo period.

Charles Jones, the author of Introduction to Economic Growth, categorized Venezuela as a “growth disaster” for its lackadaisical economic performance. The only other Latin American country in this economic hall of shame was Nicaragua – a country under the iron grip of a socialist regime and the victim of a bloody civil war.

By the time Chávez entered the political ring, Venezuela was ripe for the taking. Its disillusioned masses were looking for a savior outside of the political status quo, and Chávez fit the bill. At first, Chávez masked his radical Marxist intentions by positioning himself as an anti-corruption candidate.

However, his actions betrayed his neutral rhetoric. Out-and-out Marxists would join Chávez’s brain trust and move him towards radical socialism once in office. Sadly, Venezuela’s fed-up voters were not aware of this when they casted their ballots for Chávez. Unbeknownst to them, Chávez was about to take Venezuela on a dangerous ride.

The Rise of Socialism

Chávez was correct in his assessment of the previous Punto Fijo order’s corruption. Unfortunately, he continued the same failed policies, expanding their reach and enacting them in a tyrannical manner.

Property rights went out the window once Chávez had full control of the state apparatus. Expropriation of private property became the norm during the Chávez years. According to some reports, the Venezuelan government confiscated upwards of six million acres of farmland. Foreign companies such as ExxonMobil and ConocoPhillips also fell on the wrong side of the Venezuelan government’s expropriation crusade.

Economic ignorance continued with currency and price controls, which have caused massive distortions in the Venezuelan economy. In fact, price controls are the main culprit behind Venezuela’s infamous shortage crisis.

Making matters worse, Chávez politicized Venezuela’s Central Bank and state-owned oil company, which were already under too much government influence. State-owned PDVSA was used as a money spigot to finance Chávez’s social spending projects. The Venezuelan Central Bank cranked up the printing press and increased the money supply at astronomical rates. Consequently, hyperinflation is now a reality in Venezuela and is on par with Germany in 1923, the year of Hitler’s infamous Beer Hall Putsch that sought to capitalize on the Weimar Republic’s failed economic policies.

Although Chávez died in 2013, his tyrannical socialist system lives on with his successor Nicolás Maduro. Maduro has continued Chávez’s policy of plundering PDVSA, stripping it of investment, sacking experienced managers, and replacing them with sycophantic military officers.

Even though Venezuela has the world’s largest energy reserves according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the corruption and mismanagement of state-owned PDVSA is symbolic of the larger collapse of Venezuela. In many regards, Venezuela is a failed state and has reverted back to its historical mean – an increasingly fragmented, political backwater.

What’s Next for Venezuela?

Long lines to get basic food items. Hospitals running out of medical supplies. Starving people eating zoo animals.

These look like scenes from a post-apocalyptic film. However, these are lurid images of what present-day Venezuela is going through. By opting for the “death by a thousand cuts” route of state intervention in the marketplace, widespread institutional decay, private property seizures, fiat money, and rampant corruption – all pursued in the name of a socialist utopia – Venezuela is bleeding to death from self-inflicted wounds.

One can only wonder how this film would have played out had the Venezuelan populace been armed. Countries like the U.S. have avoided Venezuela’s fate in part due to the presence of armed civilians as a check against would-be tyrants.

If Venezuela had any semblance of a Second Amendment, the Venezuelan people could have stood up against Chávez or Maduro’s tyranny. Human history features repeated episodes of tyrants running roughshod over defenseless subjects, and the Venezuelan case is no different. Political theorist Niccolň Machiavelli was correct in his observation that force is the option of last resort against despots:
“You must know, then, that there are two methods of fighting, the one by law, the other by force: the first method is that of men, the second of beasts; but as the first method is often insufficient, one must have recourse to the second.”

For this tragic chapter of the Venezuelan story to come to a close, the Venezuelan people will have to choose a different path – a path in which property rights and free markets are respected. From there, this horror story will eventually become a distant memory.

Until then, Venezuela is joining South Africa as yet another 21st-century casualty of socialism.

Badger52 11-28-2018 06:24

Quote:

Originally Posted by miclo18d (Post 647814)
A very well written history brief of Venezuela’s decent into madness.

Thanks; I've shared this with several who're in the "here; you need to catch up..." category.

tonyz 11-28-2018 09:49

Thank you for that summary miclo18D.

Box 11-28-2018 09:57

We should be more like Venezuela - think of how grand it would be -
We would just be BETTER at being Venezuela than the Venezuelans because OUR socialists are so much smarter than theirs......

bblhead672 11-28-2018 10:18

Exactly the utopia Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and her comrades at the Democratic Socialists of America want to implement in the United States.

tom kelly 11-29-2018 16:05

UTOPIA ????
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by bblhead672 (Post 647825)
Exactly the utopia Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and her comrades at the Democratic Socialists of America want to implement in the United States.

WHO WILL BE IN ACTUAL CONTROL OF THE TRIDENT D-5's.... PEOPLE STILL BELIEVE THAT BULL SHIT ABOUT THE LAUNCH CODE RESIDING WITH THE POTUS. Each of the nuclear subs has two crews a blue and a gold who are deployed for an equal number of months on the boat. The knowledge and intellect of the crews is IMHO sufficient to program & launch the weapons on board; NO NEED FOR THE FOOTBALL, THE AGREEMENT AMONG ADVISORS, THE TURNING OF THE 2 KEYS as seen in the movies...I think that as few as 10 people on the boat could launch the D-5's tom kelly

rsdengler 11-30-2018 12:14

Quote:

Originally Posted by bblhead672 (Post 647825)
Exactly the utopia Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and her comrades at the Democratic Socialists of America want to implement in the United States.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez needs to be skewed with spikes through her hands and feet and laid out on the hot desert sand covered with fire ants......so, what's for lunch? :D

Old Dog New Trick 11-30-2018 13:47

Quote:

Originally Posted by rsdengler (Post 647900)
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez needs to be skewed with spikes through her hands and feet and laid out on the hot desert sand covered with fire ants......so, what's for lunch? :D

Why do you hate fire ants? :D

She is going to be the gift horse that keeps on giving. The 17,500 New York voters that elected her, have given the Republicans a chance to retake the House, Senate and Presidency in 2020. Every time she opens her mouth stupid and ignorance gleefully spews out.

cbtengr 11-30-2018 14:41

Quote:

Originally Posted by Old Dog New Trick (Post 647901)
Why do you hate fire ants? :D

She is going to be the gift horse that keeps on giving. The 17,500 New York voters that elected her, have given the Republicans a chance to retake the House, Senate and Presidency in 2020. Every time she opens her mouth stupid and ignorance gleefully spews out.

Maxine Waters is gonna have some competition for who is the looniest congress critter, Cortez the sister she always wanted.

Badger52 11-30-2018 15:07

Quote:

Originally Posted by cbtengr (Post 647902)
Maxine Waters is gonna have some competition for who is the looniest congress critter, Cortez the sister she always wanted.

Wait till Waters gets a coveted Financial Committee assignment and can pretend to speak about economic matters thinking she'll be taken seriously.
:cool:

tonyz 12-02-2018 09:58

Lol, yeah...if only...

Caravan Of Liberal Americans Makes Way Toward Socialist Paradise Of Venezuela
Babylon Bee
October 25th, 2018

MEXICO—A migrant caravan full of leftists desiring to enter the socialist paradise of Venezuela departed the United States Thursday and began marching toward through Mexico, stating they will demand asylum so they might experience the far better life that socialism offers.

The migrants claim they are leaving America because of its high standards of living, strong economy, and record employment numbers, and hope to find a better life in Venezuela's much more equitable system.

"Everyone there has the same quantity of possessions and food," said one marcher. "Everyone makes millions of dollars, and very few people work. It's a real paradise." The refugees have complex motivations, but the vast majority simply want to see everything socialism has to offer after suffering the amazing benefits of capitalism for too long.

Caravan organizers dispelled rumors that they were funded by Bernie Sanders, claiming the caravan was an organic grassroots movement.

At its current pace, the caravan is expected to arrive just in time for Venezuela to run out of food entirely.

https://babylonbee.com/news/caravan-...e-of-venezuela

Badger52 12-02-2018 10:53

Quote:

Originally Posted by tonyz (Post 647964)
Lol, yeah...if only...

Oh. Please. From your keyboard to God's clue-bat applied to their ears. Please.
:cool:

Seriously, that was well done.
I understand Sean Penn was not available for comment.

rsdengler 12-02-2018 12:41

Quote:

Originally Posted by Old Dog New Trick (Post 647901)
Why do you hate fire ants? :D

She is going to be the gift horse that keeps on giving. The 17,500 New York voters that elected her, have given the Republicans a chance to retake the House, Senate and Presidency in 2020. Every time she opens her mouth stupid and ignorance gleefully spews out.

Ha.......As long as they keep stinging that Bitch; well hating is easy...LOL:D

Every time she opens her mouth, makes me want to knock her teeth down her throat....

Quote:

Originally Posted by cbtengr (Post 647902)
Maxine Waters is gonna have some competition for who is the looniest congress critter, Cortez the sister she always wanted.

Yep, and for the life of me why would any person with a sound mind, and some form of intelligence vote for those ignorant cows? Wait, it's the "looney left", or should we say "looney tunes". It boggles the mind; Maxine Waters, James Brown in drag. What a total POS; both of them....LOL...;)

Pete 12-02-2018 13:53

If you ain't got a pot to piss in - they'll promise you your own pot - and you'll vote for them - and you'll get it because it's "free" - but you could have bought your own pot if you would have worked a little harder.

And when they keep telling you somebody is after your pot you'll keep voting for them just to keep your pot.

So after a while you'll still have your pot - but nothing to put in it but piss.

Badger52 12-11-2018 17:41

Well, here's some good news
 
Some interesting numbers from an RT article, ostensibly from the National Assembly itself:

As of end of November:
Inflation at 1,300,000 per cent

Oh, yeah, the good news...

The monthly RATE of inflation is down:
Quote:

According to the report by the National Assembly, the figure declined to 144 percent in November compared to 148 percent the previous month and 233 percent in September.
Whew, they almost had me worried there for a minute.

Box 12-12-2018 08:28

Remain calm, All is well.
ALL IS WELL !!!

The machine is working exactly the way it was designed.

rsdengler 12-12-2018 09:25

Yeah.....they are going to "Implode".....and when they do, lets just throw in a few of our wonderful, leftist-socialist scumbags from the Entertainment world and a few of our elected ass clown politicians.....Implode Baby...:lifter

tonyz 12-14-2018 12:28

Venezuelans regret gun ban, 'a declaration of war against an unarmed population'

Hollie McKay
Fox News Digital staff
3 hrs ago

CUCUTA, Venezuela/Colombia border – As Venezuela continues to crumble under the socialist dictatorship of President Nicolas Maduro, some are expressing words of warning – and resentment – against a six-year-old gun control bill that stripped citizens of their weapons.

“Guns would have served as a vital pillar to remaining a free people, or at least able to put up a fight,” Javier Vanegas, 28, a Venezuelan teacher of English now exiled in Ecuador, told Fox News. “The government security forces, at the beginning of this debacle, knew they had no real opposition to their force. Once things were this bad, it was a clear declaration of war against an unarmed population.”


Under the direction of then-President Hugo Chavez, the Venezuelan National Assembly in 2012 enacted the “Control of Arms, Munitions and Disarmament Law,” with the explicit aim to “disarm all citizens.” The law took effect in 2013, with only minimal pushback from some pro-democracy opposition figures, banned the legal commercial sale of guns and munitions to all - except government entities.

Chavez initially ran a months-long amnesty program encouraging Venezuelans to trade their arms for electrical goods. That year, there were only 37 recorded voluntarygun surrenders, while the majority of seizures - more than 12,500 – were by force.

In 2014, with Nicolás Maduro at the helm following Chavez’s death but carrying through his socialist “Chavista” policies, the government invested more than $47 million enforcing the gun ban – which has since included grandiose displays of public weapons demolitions in the town square.

A former gun store owner inside Venezuela – who told Fox News he has now been relegated to only selling fishing supplies since the ban – said he can’t sell any type of weaponry - even a slingshot - and underscored that even BB ammunition and airsoft guns are only issued to police and military officers.

The punishment for illicit carrying or selling a weapon now is 20 years behind bars.

Prior to the 2012 reform, there were only around eight gun stores in the entire country. And the process of obtaining a legal permit to own and carry was plagued by long wait lines, high costs and bribery “to make the process swifter” at the one department allowed to issue licenses, which operated under the umbrella of the Ministry of Defense.

“Venezuelans didn’t care enough about it. The idea of having the means to protect your home was seen as only needed out in the fields. People never would have believed they needed to defend themselves against the government,” Vanegas explained. “Venezuelans evolved to always hope that our government would be non-tyrannical, non-violator of human rights, and would always have a good enough control of criminality.”

He said it didn’t take long for such a wide-eyed public perception to fall apart. “If guns had been a stronger part of our culture, if there had been a sense of duty for one to protect their individual rights, and as a show of force against a government power – and had legal carry been a common thing – it would have made a huge difference,” he lamented.

Since April 2017, almost 200 pro-democracy protesters in Venezuela – armed mostly with stones – were shot dead by government forces in brutal retaliation to their call to end the oppressive socialist regime. The once oil-wealthy nation has continued its downward spiral into financial ruin, extreme violence, and mass human rights violations. An estimated three million Venezuelans have been forced to flee since 2015.

“Venezuela shows the deadly peril when citizens are deprived of the means of resisting the depredations of a criminal government,” said David Kopel, a policy analyst, and research director at the Independence Institute and adjunct professor of Advanced Constitutional Law at Denver University. “The Venezuelan rulers – like their Cuban masters – apparently viewed citizen possession of arms as a potential danger to a permanent communist monopoly of power.”

Although the bill was sold to the population as a hardline effort to improve security, and sharply reduce crime, many now point to Venezuela as a case study for how gun prohibition can actually produce the opposite effect.

The violent crime rate, already high, soared. Almost 28,000 people were murdered in 2015 – with the homicide rate becoming the world’s highest. Compare that, according to GunPolicy.org – an international firearms prevention and policy research initiative – to just under 10,000 in 2012, and 6,500 thousand in 2001, the year before Chavez came to power.

The total number of gun deaths in 2013 was estimated to 14,622, having steadily risen from 10,913 in 2002. While comprehensive data now goes unrecorded by the government, in September this year, Amnesty International declared Venezuela had a murder rate “worse than some war zones” – 89 people per 100,000 people - and three times that of its volatile neighbor Brazil.

Much of the crime has been attributed by analysts to government-backed gangs – referred to in Spanish as “collectivos” – who were deliberately put in place by the government.

“They were set up by the government to act as proxies and exert community control. They're the guys on the motorcycles in the poor neighborhoods, who killed any protesters,” said Vanessa Neumann, the Venezuelan-American president and founder of Asymmetrica, a Washington, D.C.-based political risk research and consulting firm. “The gun reform policy of the government was about social control. As the citizenry got more desperate and hungry and angry with the political situation, they did not want them to be able to defend themselves. It was not about security; it was about a monopoly on violence and social control.”

So while Venezuelan citizens were stripped of their legal recourse to bear arms, the “collectivos” – established by Chavez when came to power – were legally locked and loaded. Deemed crucial to the survival of the socialist dictatorship, the “collectivos” function to brutally subjugate opposition groups, while saving some face as they aren’t officially government forces, critics contend.

Eduardo Espinel, 35, who serves as a representative for the rapidly growing Venezuelan population in the Colombian border town of Cucuta – having fled his ailing nation two years ago under the threat of being kidnapped by local gangsters – said the law had proliferated the violence by allowing the collectivos to freely and legally shoot and kill.

“Everyone else but the common citizen. This law asks for the disarming of the common people, but everyone else can carry,” Espinel said. “The kind of law might make sense in a normal country, but in Venezuela, it makes no sense. People are faced with crime and have no easy means to defend themselves.”

And Maribel Arias, 35, who was once a law and political science student at the University of Los Andes in her home state of Mérida but fled to the Colombian border with her family two years ago – living mostly on the streets as she and her husband take turns finding odd jobs such as selling water and attending bathrooms and while sharing the parenting duties of tending to their four children – bemoaned that they simply cannot rely on the nation’s law enforcement.

“The people of Venezuela should have rights for gun carrying because there is just too much crime and people should have the right to defend themselves because the justice system is not working,” Arias asserted. “If you call the police, the police come only if they want. If they capture the criminal maybe they will take away whatever they stole, but they normally go free again. It’s a vicious cycle.”

Many contend the gun ban has in some ways hurt police and law enforcement, who have themselves become a more fervent target of street gangs. There was a 14 percent increase in police murders in 2016. And more than 80 percent of assailants subsequently stole the officer’s gun, according to Insight Crime.

Some experts contend many of the weapons and ammunition used by gangsters were once in the hands of government forces, and obtained either through theft or purchase from corrupt individuals.

And adding to the complication, the ranks of the police force are beleaguered by crime and corruption. “Crimes are committed by police, a lot of the criminals are police themselves,” said Saul Moros, 59, from the Venezuelan city of Valencia.

Luis Farias, 48, from Margarita, said that gun violence was indeed bad when guns were freely available for purchase. But it became much worse after the gun ban was passed. “Now the criminal mother is unleashed,” Farias said. “Trying to ban guns didn’t take guns off the streets. Nobody cares about the law; the criminals don’t care about the law.”

A black market in weapons is also thriving. There are an estimated six million unregistered firearms circulating in Venezuela, but they remain far from reach for the average, non-criminal Venezuelan.

tonyz 12-14-2018 12:29

Continued from article above...

“The black market of weapons is very active, mostly used by violent criminals,” said Johan Obdola, a former counter-narcotics chief in Venezuela and now president of Latin America-focused, Canada-based global intelligence and security firm IOSI. “Venezuelans simply looking to protect themselves from the regime are totally vulnerable.”

Prices vary daily. But an AR-15 rifle goes for around $500, sources said, while handguns sell for about $250. Those prices are far beyond the reach of the average Venezuelan.

“Most guns can be bought illegally in a sort of pyramid structure. A big irregular group or criminal organization has the best access to weapons directly from the government, and they sometimes even get access to basically new unused weaponry," explained Vanegas. "The longer down the pyramid you are, you must get your weapon from the nearest big irregular group that overpowers you within your territory. This is not an option for any moral person, due to the fact that you need to deal with criminals in order to get an illegal gun. And for many obvious reasons, people will not even consider this.”

The Venezuelan government denies it is in a deeply deteriorating crisis, caused by its own policies. Rather, it blames the United States and opposition leaders for waging an “economic war.”

According to Omar Adolfo Zares Sanchez, 48, a lawyer, politician, and former mayor of Campo Elías municipality in the Venezuelan state of Mérida, it is now all but too late to make guns legally accessible to the average person.

“Without a doubt, if there had been a balance of armed defense we could have stood up and stopped the oppression at the beginning,” he contended. “But there is too much anarchy on the streets now. Making guns easier for anybody to buy now would start a civil war.”

Other Venezuelans argue that while violence has indeed rapidly increased in the years since the gun ban, it might have been that much worse as the economy collapsed, and the country deteriorated. “The problem from the beginning and still now is that there are too many people in Venezuela who are lawless. Crime is a way of living,” said Emberly Quiroz, 25, mother of three. “Access to weapons won’t solve the problem.”

https://www.foxnews.com/world/venezu...nded-ourselves

Box 12-17-2018 08:38

Let me drill it down for all of you that are getting confused...

We need to listen to the Sean Penns, Jim Carneys, Danny Doritos, Sammy Silver-men, and Bernie Sandunes of the world - Venezuela did socialism wrong. The fact that Vuvuzelans are starting to complain about gun control IS NOT proof that social-ism is a bad ism - it is proof that conservative views about freedom and liberty are bad.

The people in V-town that are bitching about gun control are WHAT is wrong with Vuvuzela. Vuvuzela was doing just fine until conservatives tried to get all buisnessy and profity. It was doing just fine until all of the damn missionaries showed up and subverted the government.

Vuvuzela was doing JUST FINE with gun control until their citizens got all "woke" and decided they wanted a little bit of freedom and liberty...
...and food, they wanted some food too.

They had to get all 'woke' and then they strated clamoring about freedom and liberty and food - and look what it got them.
Turn-in your guns - do what the governing class tells you to do - and the governing class will be just fine.
Otherwise, you fuck things up for everybody.

Or as 'The Rock' would say - "know your role and shut your mouth"

silly capitalists - get with the program

Badger52 12-18-2018 20:52

Feel the Bern
 
Gee, I guess we all just misinterpreted what Bernie knew all along...

Quote:

These days, the American dream is more apt to be realized in South America, in places such as Ecuador, Venezuela and Argentina, where incomes are actually more equal today than they are in the land of Horatio Alger. Who's the banana republic now? (written in 2011)
TTFN, I'm off to bake some more Schadenfreude Pie. (Because I have a kitchen in my house, food in that kitchen, and am healthy enough to do it, and, ah screw it, just because I can.)

Box 12-19-2018 09:18

Quote:

Originally Posted by Badger52 (Post 648394)
Gee, I guess we all just misinterpreted what Bernie knew all along...

TTFN, I'm off to bake some more Schadenfreude Pie. (Because I have a kitchen in my house, food in that kitchen, and am healthy enough to do it, and, ah screw it, just because I can.)


Bernie Sanders is a symbol of all that is wrong in our country. A rich old white guy from new england who essentially makes his money by preaching about how damaging it is to our country to have rich old whitre men in charge of our country...
...and then campaigns for the job of "runner of the country" - And people fucking love him!!! In our current climate - it is very possible that he could have beat trump him 2016 - but hey, Vuvuzela is where the American dream is


Come and listen to a story 'bout a man named Ed
Poor mountaineer barely kept his family fed
Then one day he was beggin’ for some food,
And up through the ground come a bubbling crude
(Oil that is, black gold, Venezuelan tea)

Well the first thing you know old
Ed’s a millionaire
Kin folk said, Ed move away from there
Said Venezuela is the place you oughta be
So they loaded up the truck
and they moved to next to the sea
(Caribbean that is, cess pools, movie stars)

rsdengler 12-19-2018 11:13

Quote:

Originally Posted by Box (Post 648405)
Bernie Sanders is a symbol of all that is wrong in our country. A rich old white guy from new england who essentially makes his money by preaching about how damaging it is to our country to have rich old whitre men in charge of our country...
...and then campaigns for the job of "runner of the country" - And people fucking love him!!! In our current climate - it is very possible that he could have beat trump him 2016 - but hey, Vuvuzela is where the American dream is

This Country is soooo F'd up..(sort of like my life). Bernie Sanders is a perfect example of a putrid, slimy cesspool and the people who follow him drank the freakin contaminated kool-aid. They don't want to contribute, they don't want to work, they want everything handed to them, and they expect something that is not earned. People who think extreme leftist socialism is "good" for society have a rude awakening. It's an illusion, and they fall for it every time. Yeah, Bernie is a rich, fat, old POS white guy who's wife is corrupt and it's freakin OK...because he's BERNIE....and he will give you everything; for a price that is.....The New Venezuela...come on over you filthy animals, and drink the f'ing kool-aid.....;)

Pete 12-19-2018 15:02

Five of Maduro’s Big Lenders Want Their Money Back. Good Luck.
 
Five of Maduro’s Big Lenders Want Their Money Back. Good Luck.

https://www.thenewamerican.com/world...2563&vcid=8714

Get in there first before it's all gone. Well, it is all gone so they're going to be fighting over scraps.

"Five investment firms holding $380 million of one of Venezuela’s bonds demanded payment of both the principal and unpaid interest on Monday. This could be the trigger that unleashes an avalanche of claims by more than 40 creditors holding $150 billion of Venezuela’s debt.

The Marxist regimes that have controlled Venezuela for the last 20 years have finally run out of other people’s money, and now those other people want it back....."


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