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Old 03-14-2012, 18:33   #16
Dusty
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Better give this cat a triple dose, then:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...hes-black.html

Actor Samuel L. Jackson has admitted that he became a supporter of Barack Obama in 2008 because of his race.

In an interview for Ebony magazine's March issue, the Oscar-nominated screen legend says his decision to vote for Mr Obama was nothing to do with his political beliefs.

'I voted for Barack because he was black. 'Cuz that’s why other folks vote for other people — because they look like them,' Mr Jackson told the magazine, according to the New York Post.
Politics aside: In an interview with Ebony Magazine actor Samuel L. Jackson said he voted for President Barack Obama in 2008 only because he's black
'That’s American politics, pure and simple,' he said. [Obama’s] message didn’t mean **** to me. In the end, he’s a politician. I just hoped he would do some of what he said he was gonna do.
'I know politicians say ****; they lie. 'Cuz they want to get elected.'

While discussing Mr Obama's chances of re-election, Mr Jackson launched into a profanity-laden rant, repeatedly using the N-word.
The actor has defended his use of the charged racial epithet by saying that it was used at home while he was growing up.

Performance: Contrasting with the Ebony interview of favoring the president without political agendas, Mr Jackson told Newsweek in January that he weighs Mr Obama's job performance on his handing of the poor
'When it comes down to it, they wouldn’t have elected a n*****,' he said. 'Because what’s a n*****? A n***** is scary.
'Obama ain’t scary at all. N****** don’t have beers at the White House. N****** don’t let some white dude, while you in the middle of a speech, call [him] a liar. A n***** would have stopped the meeting right there and said, "Who the **** said that?"
'I hope Obama gets scary in the next four years,' Mr Jackson added, 'cuz he ain’t gotta worry about getting re-elected.'

In a separate interview with Newsweek published in January, the actor said he has mixed feelings about the President's performance so far.

Rally: Attending Mr Obama's Inaugural ceremony in 2008, Mr Jackson was one of many rallying celebrities for the black politician
'Some days I agree with Dr. [Cornel] West and what he says about the President not dealing enough with the plight of the poor,' Mr Jackson said in the Newsweek interview.
'Then I think about how they won’t give him credit for anything... The President got about a week of moderate applause for capturing the most-wanted man in the world,' he said in reference to Osama bin Laden.
'You ask me, he should have put that mother****** on ice and defrosted his ass November 1.'

In President Obama's first campaign for presidency in 2008, Mr Jackson was one of many celebrities who rallied behind him, and even skipped an Oscar award ceremony specifically to campaign for the candidate.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz1p8Yrw8TY
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Old 03-14-2012, 18:52   #17
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Originally Posted by Paslode View Post
Talk about bias, labeling and discrimination...I had hopes the likes of David Duke would have been accompanied by King Shabazz and Louie Farrakahn....they even called them 'White people' instead of the appropriate term Caucasian.

What's wrong with that? Didn't you know that the International Panel on Climate Change recently established the fact that only "white people" are capable of racism.

Will ObamaCare cover/mandate this drug for all "white people"? Find out after the election!
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Old 03-14-2012, 19:09   #18
Paslode
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The actor has defended his use of the charged racial epithet by saying that it was used at home while he was growing up.
That sounds like his green lighting the broad use of that epithet.....IF you heard it as a kid. WOW! Nothing like lowering the bar....


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I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.
Appears like Sammy L doesn't think much about Dr. Kings wish... That is sad, it is acceptable but it is truly sad.


I wonder what would be said if a White person didn't vote for Obama because of his color or they didn't vote for Romney because he was a Mormon?


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Originally Posted by John_Chrichton View Post
Will ObamaCare cover/mandate this drug for all "white people"? Find out after the election!

I am quite sure the former Kansas Governor Sebelius is already cracking the whip in side DHHS for funding and the legalese to make it happen.
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Last edited by Paslode; 03-14-2012 at 19:13.
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Old 03-15-2012, 05:38   #19
ddoering
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Originally Posted by Dusty View Post
Better give this cat a triple dose, then:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...hes-black.html

Actor Samuel L. Jackson has admitted that he became a supporter of Barack Obama in 2008 because of his race.

In an interview for Ebony magazine's March issue, the Oscar-nominated screen legend says his decision to vote for Mr Obama was nothing to do with his political beliefs.

'I voted for Barack because he was black. 'Cuz thatís why other folks vote for other people ó because they look like them,' Mr Jackson told the magazine, according to the New York Post.
Politics aside: In an interview with Ebony Magazine actor Samuel L. Jackson said he voted for President Barack Obama in 2008 only because he's black
'Thatís American politics, pure and simple,' he said. [Obamaís] message didnít mean **** to me. In the end, heís a politician. I just hoped he would do some of what he said he was gonna do.
'I know politicians say ****; they lie. 'Cuz they want to get elected.'

While discussing Mr Obama's chances of re-election, Mr Jackson launched into a profanity-laden rant, repeatedly using the N-word.
The actor has defended his use of the charged racial epithet by saying that it was used at home while he was growing up.

Performance: Contrasting with the Ebony interview of favoring the president without political agendas, Mr Jackson told Newsweek in January that he weighs Mr Obama's job performance on his handing of the poor
'When it comes down to it, they wouldnít have elected a n*****,' he said. 'Because whatís a n*****? A n***** is scary.
'Obama ainít scary at all. N****** donít have beers at the White House. N****** donít let some white dude, while you in the middle of a speech, call [him] a liar. A n***** would have stopped the meeting right there and said, "Who the **** said that?"
'I hope Obama gets scary in the next four years,' Mr Jackson added, 'cuz he ainít gotta worry about getting re-elected.'

In a separate interview with Newsweek published in January, the actor said he has mixed feelings about the President's performance so far.

Rally: Attending Mr Obama's Inaugural ceremony in 2008, Mr Jackson was one of many rallying celebrities for the black politician
'Some days I agree with Dr. [Cornel] West and what he says about the President not dealing enough with the plight of the poor,' Mr Jackson said in the Newsweek interview.
'Then I think about how they wonít give him credit for anything... The President got about a week of moderate applause for capturing the most-wanted man in the world,' he said in reference to Osama bin Laden.
'You ask me, he should have put that mother****** on ice and defrosted his ass November 1.'

In President Obama's first campaign for presidency in 2008, Mr Jackson was one of many celebrities who rallied behind him, and even skipped an Oscar award ceremony specifically to campaign for the candidate.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz1p8Yrw8TY
Perhaps they should spend more time on developing a pill to cure stupid.
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Old 03-15-2012, 08:04   #20
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Originally Posted by Paslode View Post
I wonder what would be said if a White person didn't vote for Obama because of his color...
There have been plenty of white media strokers for the last 3 years (with the guilt necklace they put on each morning) tossing out the same vile krap.

They don't realize that they may be the last to feel the panga but feel it they will when they're not needed. Unlike Samuel L. Jackson, they're not one of Holder's "my people."
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Old 03-15-2012, 08:36   #21
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Originally Posted by Badger52 View Post
There have been plenty of white media strokers for the last 3 years (with the guilt necklace they put on each morning) tossing out the same vile krap.

They don't realize that they may be the last to feel the panga but feel it they will when they're not needed. Unlike Samuel L. Jackson, they're not one of Holder's "my people."
Jackson is outspoken, and may be the rule rather than the exception in terms of how AA's feel about Obama.

If that's the case, they'll stay away from the polling booths in droves, this time, 'cause poor li'l ol' Barry Soetero just didn't turn out to be like the President in Fifth Element.

Some people learn the hard way; take these kids who are being "taught" nowadays by Chamberlainesque "educators" that you don't need to win, so you don't need a trophy when the game's over. They're coming into the reality of the world, and learning that milquetoast liberalism isn't any good for running a Country or putting meat on the table.

The only thing that will save us from ruin is a transfusion of Conservatism, if it's not already too late.
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Old 03-15-2012, 09:04   #22
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Quote:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...hes-black.html

'You ask me, he should have put that mother****** on ice and defrosted his ass November 1.'
I thought they defrosted him just in time...any longer and it might have looked staged.
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Old 03-15-2012, 09:26   #23
Richard
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In an Aesop sort of sense, it seems to me like this is but an on-going race to either declare or deny humankind's long-documented penchant for being influenced by some "-ism" of one sort or another...and to me there still seems to be a whole lot of hares and few tortoises involved.

And so it goes...

Richard
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Old 03-15-2012, 09:28   #24
Dusty
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard View Post
In an Aesop sort of sense, it seems to me like this is but an on-going race to either declare or deny humankind's long-documented penchant for being influenced by some "-ism" of one sort or another...and to me there still seems to be a whole lot of hares and few tortoises involved.

And so it goes...

Richard
Yeah, well the Crow and the Snake comes to mind in this case, Sir Richard.
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The Red Pill or the Blue Pill....
Old 03-15-2012, 12:43   #25
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The Red Pill or the Blue Pill....

Quote:
Manipulating morals: scientists target drugs that improve behaviour

Researchers say morality treatments could be used instead of prison and might even help humanity tackle global issues

Amelia Hill
guardian.co.uk, Monday 4 April 2011 11.23 EDT


Existing drugs such as Prozac are already known to affect moral behaviour, but scientists predict that advances may allow more sophisticated manipulations. Photograph: Scott Camazine/Alamy

A pill to enhance moral behaviour, a treatment for racist thoughts, a therapy to increase your empathy for people in other countries - these may sound like the stuff of science fiction but with medicine getting closer to altering our moral state, society should be preparing for the consequences, according to a book that reviews scientific developments in the field.

Drugs such as Prozac that alter a patient's mental state already have an impact on moral behaviour, but scientists predict that future medical advances may allow much more sophisticated manipulations.

The field is in its infancy, but "it's very far from being science fiction", said Dr Guy Kahane, deputy director of the Oxford Centre for Neuroethics and a Wellcome Trust biomedical ethics award winner.

"Science has ignored the question of moral improvement so far, but it is now becoming a big debate," he said. "There is already a growing body of research you can describe in these terms. Studies show that certain drugs affect the ways people respond to moral dilemmas by increasing their sense of empathy, group affiliation and by reducing aggression."

Researchers have become very interested in developing biomedical technologies capable of intervening in the biological processes that affect moral behaviour and moral thinking, according to Dr Tom Douglas, a Wellcome Trust research fellow at Oxford University's Uehiro Centre. "It is a very hot area of scientific study right now."

He is co-author of Enhancing Human Capacities, published on Monday, which includes a chapter on moral enhancement.

Drugs that affect our moral thinking and behaviour already exist, but we tend not to think of them in that way. [Prozac] lowers aggression and bitterness against environment and so could be said to make people more agreeable. Or Oxytocin, the so-called love hormone ... increases feelings of social bonding and empathy while reducing anxiety," he said.

"Scientists will develop more of these drugs and create new ways of taking drugs we already know about. We can already, for example, take prescribed doses of Oxytocin as a nasal spray," he said.

But would pharmacologically-induced altruism, for example, amount to genuine moral behaviour? Guy Kahane, deputy director of the Oxford Centre for Neuroethics and a Wellcome Trust biomedical ethics award winner, said: "We can change people's emotional responses but quite whether that improves their moral behaviour is not something science can answer."

He also admitted that it was unlikely people would "rush to take a pill that would make them morally better.

"Becoming more trusting, nicer, less aggressive and less violent can make you more vulnerable to exploitation," he said. "On the other hand, it could improve your relationships or help your career."

Kahane does not advocate putting morality drugs in the water supply, but he suggests that if administered widely they might help humanity to tackle global issues.

"Relating to the plight of people on other side of the world or of future generations is not in our nature," he said. "This new body of drugs could make possible feelings of global affiliation and of abstract empathy for future generations."

Ruud ter Meulen, chair in ethics in medicine and director of the centre for ethics in medicine at the University of Bristol, warned that while some drugs can improve moral behaviour, other drugs - and sometimes the same ones - can have the opposite effect.

"While Oxytocin makes you more likely to trust and co-operate with others in your social group, it reduces empathy for those outside the group," Meulen said.

The use of deep brain stimulation, used to help those with Parkinson's disease, has had unintended consequences, leading to cases where patients begin stealing from shops and even becoming sexually aggressive, he added.

"Basic moral behaviour is to be helpful to others, feel responsible to others, have a sense of solidarity and sense of justice," he said. "I'm not sure that drugs can ever achieve this. But there's no question that they can make us more likeable, more social, less aggressive, more open attitude to other people," he said.

Meulen also suggested that moral-enhancement drugs might be used in the criminal justice system. "These drugs will be more effective in prevention and cure than prison," he said.


Researchers say morality treatments could be used instead of prison and might even help humanity tackle global issues

Existing drugs such as Prozac are already known to affect moral behaviour, but scientists predict that advances may allow more sophisticated manipulations. Photograph: Scott Camazine/Alamy

A pill to enhance moral behaviour, a treatment for racist thoughts, a therapy to increase your empathy for people in other countries - these may sound like the stuff of science fiction but with medicine getting closer to altering our moral state, society should be preparing for the consequences, according to a book that reviews scientific developments in the field.

Drugs such as Prozac that alter a patient's mental state already have an impact on moral behaviour, but scientists predict that future medical advances may allow much more sophisticated manipulations.

The field is in its infancy, but "it's very far from being science fiction", said Dr Guy Kahane, deputy director of the Oxford Centre for Neuroethics and a Wellcome Trust biomedical ethics award winner.

"Science has ignored the question of moral improvement so far, but it is now becoming a big debate," he said. "There is already a growing body of research you can describe in these terms. Studies show that certain drugs affect the ways people respond to moral dilemmas by increasing their sense of empathy, group affiliation and by reducing aggression."

Researchers have become very interested in developing biomedical technologies capable of intervening in the biological processes that affect moral behaviour and moral thinking, according to Dr Tom Douglas, a Wellcome Trust research fellow at Oxford University's Uehiro Centre. "It is a very hot area of scientific study right now."

He is co-author of Enhancing Human Capacities, published on Monday, which includes a chapter on moral enhancement.

Drugs that affect our moral thinking and behaviour already exist, but we tend not to think of them in that way. [Prozac] lowers aggression and bitterness against environment and so could be said to make people more agreeable. Or Oxytocin, the so-called love hormone ... increases feelings of social bonding and empathy while reducing anxiety," he said.

"Scientists will develop more of these drugs and create new ways of taking drugs we already know about. We can already, for example, take prescribed doses of Oxytocin as a nasal spray," he said.

But would pharmacologically-induced altruism, for example, amount to genuine moral behaviour? Guy Kahane, deputy director of the Oxford Centre for Neuroethics and a Wellcome Trust biomedical ethics award winner, said: "We can change people's emotional responses but quite whether that improves their moral behaviour is not something science can answer."

He also admitted that it was unlikely people would "rush to take a pill that would make them morally better.

"Becoming more trusting, nicer, less aggressive and less violent can make you more vulnerable to exploitation," he said. "On the other hand, it could improve your relationships or help your career."

Kahane does not advocate putting morality drugs in the water supply, but he suggests that if administered widely they might help humanity to tackle global issues.

"Relating to the plight of people on other side of the world or of future generations is not in our nature," he said. "This new body of drugs could make possible feelings of global affiliation and of abstract empathy for future generations."

Ruud ter Meulen, chair in ethics in medicine and director of the centre for ethics in medicine at the University of Bristol, warned that while some drugs can improve moral behaviour, other drugs - and sometimes the same ones - can have the opposite effect.

"While Oxytocin makes you more likely to trust and co-operate with others in your social group, it reduces empathy for those outside the group," Meulen said.

The use of deep brain stimulation, used to help those with Parkinson's disease, has had unintended consequences, leading to cases where patients begin stealing from shops and even becoming sexually aggressive, he added.

"Basic moral behaviour is to be helpful to others, feel responsible to others, have a sense of solidarity and sense of justice," he said. "I'm not sure that drugs can ever achieve this. But there's no question that they can make us more likeable, more social, less aggressive, more open attitude to other people," he said.

Meulen also suggested that moral-enhancement drugs might be used in the criminal justice system. "These drugs will be more effective in prevention and cure than prison," he said.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/20...ical-behaviour
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Old 03-15-2012, 12:58   #26
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If that's the case, they'll stay away from the polling booths in droves, this time, 'cause poor li'l ol' Barry Soetero just didn't turn out to be like the President in Fifth Element.
From what I see on some city streets (when I have to be in one) he didn't even succeed in getting his "bro's" to "pull up yer damn pants..."
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Old 03-15-2012, 15:01   #27
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The Implicit Attitude Test given to the participants of this study is designed to "penetrate" the tendency to "hide" feelings on an subject.

https://implicit.harvard.edu/implici...ound/index.jsp

So, are people bowing to embarassment over their attitute toward race or actually fooling themselves? My guess would be embarasmemnt, but perhaps that's giving too much credit.
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Old 03-15-2012, 16:16   #28
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Yep and Celebrex is a much safer drug than Loritab when taken as directed too...

Interesting what some people spend their time on. Lithium as well as other bipolar drugs would probably work better...for less money.

bs
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Old 03-15-2012, 16:44   #29
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Originally Posted by steel71 View Post
More race baiting from the corporate media[....]
Is that where the baiting is coming from?
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Old 03-15-2012, 19:00   #30
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I have been taking Propranolol for three years in fact ever since Obama was elected. It was prescribed to help me cope with migraine headaches, evidently the drug treats a myriad of ailments. But I must admit in my case to having negative reactions whenever I see the annointed one on tv or in the papers, same goes for seeing his atty. general, the vp, Harry Reid, Nancy Pelosi etc. etc.
My migraine symptoms on the other hand are much improved.
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