Old 12-09-2008, 17:39   #61
rm1249
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flash light fire

I saw this recently on 'Survivorman' on the Discovery Channel:
Gently break the glass bulb of a flashlight without breaking the filaments inside, Once the glass is removed replace the 'bulb' -- now only the insides of the bulb in the flash light, then gently place light, dry tinder against the filaments and turn on. On the episode the fire started immediately.

I am making a trip to the store this weekend to pick up a cheap flashlight to give this a try, I'll let be sure to update whether this is a plausible option for fire-starting.

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Old 07-26-2009, 22:44   #62
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To get the spark on my tinder the easy choice is a Bic lighter. But I always carry my "metal match" with my Leatherman at all times just in case that lighter doesn't want to work.

My personal favorite man made tinder is Trioxine. You can get head high flames with one bar of Trioxine and soaking wet "squaw wood" in just a few minutes. Another great multi use tinder is Cotton balls and vaseline. Great for starting a fire and also good to have for chapped lips after a few dehydrated days in the field.
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Old 08-19-2009, 10:06   #63
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I carry a little bit of jute twine for tinder. It has never failed me, even when wet. I soaked a length of it in a jar of water for a couple of days, took it out, wrapped it around my hand, took that big loop off and took two sticks and twisted all the water out of it I could, and then immediately frayed it into a little bird's nest, and it caught right away from a ferro rod spark. I tested it to the assumed point of failure, and it didn't.

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Old 08-20-2009, 15:10   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rm1249 View Post
I saw this recently on 'Survivorman' on the Discovery Channel:
Gently break the glass bulb of a flashlight without breaking the filaments inside, Once the glass is removed replace the 'bulb' -- now only the insides of the bulb in the flash light, then gently place light, dry tinder against the filaments and turn on. On the episode the fire started immediately.

I am making a trip to the store this weekend to pick up a cheap flashlight to give this a try, I'll let be sure to update whether this is a plausible option for fire-starting.

rm1249
While you're at the store, pick up some candles cuz your flashlight won't work anymore. Are you sure you didn't get this idea from Myke Hawke?
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Old 08-20-2009, 15:37   #65
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Hey, if you're going to take a flashlight, why not just buy a little waterproof one and fill it with matches? Then you won't have to try to carefully break the glass bulb, without damaging the filament, all while your hands are trembling from cold-wet. Of course, I ain't "Survivorman" or Myke Hawke!
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Old 10-18-2012, 20:29   #66
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Natural tinder

I like to have a Bic lighter or two, and generally carry a camp hatchet.

A really nice tinder is small pieces of wood from a pine tree stump. It lights when wet, burns quickly and hot, absolutely wonderful.

Hit the stump with an axe and get a piece off, if it smells like pine oil, you've got it. Leaves sap on your axe head which is a pain to clean off, but what do you expect with pine?
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Old 10-19-2012, 13:24   #67
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Carried a 'metal match', BIC lighter and various kindling (plain / soaked patches; pine shavings sometimes dipped in paraffin) in a zip-lock bag.

After reading the other posts, I see I'm behind the times and there are more sure fire ways (pun intended), more elegant methods.
Always learning, thanks.
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Old 10-20-2012, 08:40   #68
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When camping / hiking, I always keep fire steel and a small medication bottle with a table spoon of vaseline and the rest stuffed full of cotton balls. I usually use these as a last resort or when severe laziness kicks in. Normally, I'll try to grab birch bark when I can, which when shredded makes phenomenal tinder. If not, I feather a dry stick, usually pine, and use the fire steel.
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Old 06-30-2013, 14:18   #69
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As has already been stated here multiple times, it really doesn't get more simple than the bic. I have been studying fire craft all my life. Fire was my area of responsibility as a kid when my family did commercial fishing and trapping. I would be dropped at our chosen camp or work site, and I was to have the fire up and going good and hot by the time my father and brother returned with very cold wet hands, regardless of the weather. I got pretty good with fire at a young age, but it became a subject of serious study after dealing with frost bite while in an unfamiliar environment and nearly losing half my toes.

I never go to the woods without at least one bic, but mechanical parts can fail and fuel can leak so I also always have at least one ferro rod fire starter on me. Not all ferro rod fire starters are created equally. The LMF are ok, I've went through a few in the course of teaching classes. My favorite standard style ferro rod is the polySTRIKER from Exotac Inc. They throw awesome sparks. My wife had no trouble getting fire started using birch bark tinder the first time she used one.
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Old 06-30-2013, 14:20   #70
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More pics
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Old 06-30-2013, 14:30   #71
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Exotac nanoSTRIKER XL

Another of my favorites is the nanoSTRIKER XL also made by Exotac Inc. Ferrocerium's main weakness is salt from sweat or salt water. The nanoSTRIKERs are a sealed unit that store the rod in the handle and have their own striker. On these the rod is threaded and replaceable so when you wear it down you just replace the rod not the whole unit. I have a few of them, and a smaller Ti model that has been on my key ring for nearly four years that I am never without.
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Old 06-30-2013, 17:25   #72
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-Potasium permanganate and glycerin-
Potasium permanganate is an anticeptic powder and glycerin is used to treat ear infections. You should cary these items in your first aid kit. When these two substances are combined they burst into flame. If portability is an issue, its a good idea to carry items with multiple uses.

from ( http://www.freewebs.com/barksoup/survival.htm )

The key word above is 'burst'...

Have a good 'Fathers Day' Dads...


I have to admit, that I have this in my kit. Works well in warm temperature and makes a very hot fire. I also, build a "Log Cabin" type of fire starter with the small ignitable material(s) inside the cabin.
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Old 07-01-2013, 17:24   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Cram View Post
-Potasium permanganate and glycerin-
Potasium permanganate is an anticeptic powder and glycerin is used to treat ear infections. You should cary these items in your first aid kit. When these two substances are combined they burst into flame. If portability is an issue, its a good idea to carry items with multiple uses.

from ( http://www.freewebs.com/barksoup/survival.htm )

The key word above is 'burst'...

Have a good 'Fathers Day' Dads...
I missed this post back when!! I was doing a "Quan/Qual" Analysis in Chem II in High School and added some of the "Subject Liquid" to Potassium Permangenate, it melted a crucible and gutted the fan in the Vent-Hood!!!
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Old 07-02-2013, 19:27   #74
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Friction fire has been mentioned. I'm curious if any have used the two-stick hearth board technique for the bow drill method? It requires less cutting and precision, and in general a better bow drill technique for survival applications in areas where good materials for it are available.
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Old 08-13-2013, 17:54   #75
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My wife and I recently returned from and week and a half camping in SE WY. SGT son was able to join us for a couple of days after his annual training down at Ft. Carson. One afternoon he and I decided to try our hand and fire starting with the methods that we regularly carry in our pockets or packs (except the BICs and matches).

SGT son frustrated himself with a mag-block and ferro rod. I didn’t even try because it was too windy. I frustrated myself by trying the use the magnifying glass on my Type 15 compass. I tried note paper, tissue paper, lint, ants, and dead, dry, pine needles. No joy. The only char marks were on the pine needles. (Not sure about the ants, because they ran away screaming.)

My son was successful with char-cloth and a “bird’s nest” of dry grass and char-cloth with a bird’s nest of jute. Also, he found a cigarette butt and started the fluffed up filter with the ferro rod. I was successful with my EDC Swedish Fire Starter and dryer lint in pine needles and SFS with pine needles and EDC hand sanitizer (packet). Obviously, the hand sanitizer was the easiest and best.

The char-cloth my son used was mine and is made and carried in an Altoid can that I punched a hole in for charring. I also carry my mag-block and a couple of inches of jute in the can. I have made char-cord using the jute, but did not have any with me this trip.

A good time was had by all! (Except the ants.)

Pat
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