PDA

View Full Version : HELP!!! Ticks on the Nads (No Joke)


Archangel
05-09-2005, 00:13
Ok I did a search on here & also on Google on how to remove ticks, but could not find anything about how to remove ticks that have embedded themselves under the scrotum skin.

Yes, after this drill weekend, I found two of those bastards on my nads. I've tried using several tweezers, but since they have buried themselves underneath the skin, I don't want to mess up & really mess up.

Please help. :(

Roguish Lawyer
05-09-2005, 00:31
Have you tried this?

NousDefionsDoc
05-09-2005, 00:35
Put a little nail polish or Vaseline on the little bastard (the tick), then about 15 minutes later, pull him off (the tick) with a slow steady pull. Don't break the head or mouth (of the tick) off.

NousDefionsDoc
05-09-2005, 00:36
Have you tried this?
You're not helping...

NousDefionsDoc
05-09-2005, 00:43
I almost forgot - make sure you wash the area and your hands when you get through and apply an antibiotic creme to the area. Watch for S/S of infection.

You don't need to rub the creme in, just put it on there and leave it alone.

Huey14
05-09-2005, 01:39
Will putting it on top of the skin above where the bastards are work also?

I don't have them, BTW.

SwedeGlocker
05-09-2005, 07:58
DO NOT cover ticks with nail polish or Vaseline. It increses the risk for diesese to be transfered. The only safe way to remove them is straight pull. Observe so that you got the hole tick.

The Reaper
05-09-2005, 09:01
Defoliate half of the affected area by shaving.

Liberally apply military issue Insect Repellent to the other half.

Ignite the bug juice.

Stab the little pests with a bayonet as they attempt to escape to sanctuary.

TR

Kyobanim
05-09-2005, 09:03
ROTFLMMFAO!!

Are they male or female?

Archangel
05-09-2005, 09:05
I pulled off 4 from other parts of my body pretty easily & disinfected the area with Neosporin. However, I'm still have problems with the ones down below.

There are a lot of articles from my Google search that advised not to use Vasaline, rubbing alcohol or anything like that (makes them throw up on you). The problem is that those damn ticks are underneath the skin (their whole body, not just the head & the tweezers can't grab them). I might have to go in with an Exacto knife, to cut the skin so I can get the tweezers in to grab them. I was hoping for other options before I have to do this.

BTW, it's not just me. Our whole unit got owned by ticks this weekend. :mad:

The Reaper
05-09-2005, 09:18
On a serious note, this is why you apply a lot of insect repellent to your boots and other low areas (NOT sensitive areas), avoid lying in bedding areas, like pine straw, and do buddy checks frequently.

With the diseases ticks transmit, your CoC should understand and have no problems letting you and your buds strip down and check one another's inaccessible areas periodically.

Those ticks didn't dig in in a few minutes, they were left unmolested for quite a while.

I picked off 83 in the team room one morning after just a couple of hours doing team IADs in the area. Hurts a lot less if you get them off before they set up housekeeping.

Do not use an X-Acto knife, leave surgery to the surgeons, or GOOD 18Ds, unless you are planning on getting a vasectomy and an infection at the same time anyway.

Wait till chigger season. :D

TR

Archangel
05-09-2005, 09:24
Wait till chigger season. :D

TRI thought that was this w/e!

Anyway, I found this article & hope that it will help other people with this problem.

Tick Removal

Many methods of tick removal that have been reported in the literature have proved to be unsatisfactory in controlled studies. Some methods may even cause harm by inducing the tick to salivate and regurgitate into the host. Ticks are best removed as soon as possible, because the risk of disease transmission increases significantly after 24 hours of attachment. The use of a blunt, medium-tipped, angled forceps offers the best results. Following tick removal, the bite area should be inspected carefully for any retained mouthparts, which should be excised. The area is then cleaned with antiseptic solution, and the patient is instructed to monitor for signs of local or systemic illness. Routine antibiotic prophylaxis following tick removal generally is not indicated but may be considered in pregnant patients or in areas endemic to tick-borne disease.

Because tick bites are nearly painless, a tick may not be noticed until after it is attached. It is important to remove the tick from the host as soon as possible after it is discovered. Animal and human studies have shown that the risk of Lyme disease transmission increases significantly after 24 hours of attachment and is even higher after more than 48 hours.

In addition to timely removal, it is important to remove the tick completely, including the mouthpart and the cement the tick has secreted to secure attachment. Improper tick removal may cause mouthparts to break off in the skin, possibly leading to infection or granuloma formation.7 Twisting off the head should be avoided, because this may cause the tick's potentially infectious body fluids to escape.

Ticks should never be handled with bare hands and should be disposed of with hazardous waste or preserved in alcohol if identification is needed.

Few methods for tick removal that have been reported in the literature have scientific support. Some methods that are not recommended (Table 1) include applying a hot match or nail to the tick body; covering the tick with petroleum jelly, nail polish, alcohol or gasoline; using injected or topical lidocaine (Xylocaine); or passing a suture needle through the tick.8-15 Although there is conflicting evidence as to whether the removal technique influences infection rates,6,10,16 these methods may induce the tick to salivate and regurgitate into the attachment site, theoretically increasing the risk of infection.8,11

Commercially available tick-removal devices include the Sawyer Tick Pliers (B&A Products, Bunch, Okla.), Pro-Tick Remedy (SCS Limited, Stony Point, N.Y.) and Ticked Off (Ticked Off Inc., Dover, N.H.). Although one study17 found that the Pro-Tick Remedy and Ticked Off devices left mouthparts in the skin less often, all three devices listed above were recommended over tweezers for tick removal. Another study2 recommended the Ticked Off device but did not compare it with other devices. There are other commercially available tick-removal devices, but no studies have evaluated their usefulness.

The most commonly recommended and successful tick-removal method is manual extraction of the tick.7,8,10,11,16,18-21 [Reference 16--Evidence level B, nonrandomized study] A blunt, medium-tipped, angled forceps offers the best results, using the method shown in Figure 1

http://www.aafp.org/afp/20020815/643_f1a.jpg

http://www.aafp.org/afp/20020815/643_f1b.jpg

After a tick is removed, an antiseptic solution is applied to the attachment site, and patients should be educated about the signs and symptoms of local and systemic illness. There is conflicting evidence as to the need for routine antibiotic prophylaxis.22-24 Although a discussion of evidence is beyond the scope of this article, most experts, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Infectious Diseases Society of America, do not recommend routine antibiotic prophylaxis.25,26 [Reference 26--Evidence level C, expert opinion] However, antibiotic use may be considered in patients who are deemed high-risk, in pregnant patients, and in patients living in areas endemic to tick-borne disease.

QRQ 30
05-09-2005, 09:43
Defoliate half of the affected area by shaving.

Liberally apply military issue Insect Repellent to the other half.

Ignite the bug juice.

Stab the little pests with a bayonet as they attempt to escape to sanctuary.

TR

Whew!! I am so glad to see some of y'all still have a sense of humor. :D

The deed being done, you have some good advice. Personally, clear fingernail polish has worked in the past.

The next step is prevention (should have been the first step). Panty hose and flea collars have been effective. We always used the buddy system to check for ticks, chiggers, leeches (yeccchhh) and other critters,

As for military repellent, is it still as it was 30 years ago. If so you won't need a match. One of my men was shot in the leg and he was screaming bloody murder. From the stain on his pants leg and his screaming we thought he took a pretty good shot. I ripped open his pants leg and found a scratch. The round had gone through his insect repellant and mearly scratched his leg. :D

JPH
05-09-2005, 10:44
I will add this, as something I learned form a National Park Ranger. Use sulfur to keep the bastards from ever getting on you. The bottle that I have says “Sulfur Sublimed” on it and is a 16 ounce bottle of dry yellow powder sulfur. I dust both layers of socks with it then roll the top edge of them down after have them on and pour in a bit more then roll them back up, I also dust the opening around my boots and dust all waistbands and other places where the skin stays soft wet and warm (which is what the bastards like).

It sounds crazy but it works for me, they still get me under my arms, and behind my knees, and a few other places but I’ll be dammed if I haven’t had one where I still had sulfur… :D

Only bummer is you can end up smelling like bad eggs. :confused:

Well worth it in my book. :munchin

JPH

NousDefionsDoc
05-09-2005, 11:28
DO NOT cover ticks with nail polish or Vaseline. It increses the risk for diesese to be transfered. The only safe way to remove them is straight pull. Observe so that you got the hole tick.
Yes, it does, as they will puke. But it is not nearly as bad as leaving pieces inside and they will probably puke anyway because you are squeezing them with the forceps. I will take A over B any day.

NousDefionsDoc
05-09-2005, 11:29
JPH,
That is a good idea and it works - for civilians - do you really think a soldier should be wandering around in the woods reeking of sulfur?

NousDefionsDoc
05-09-2005, 11:31
Will putting it on top of the skin above where the bastards are work also?

I don't have them, BTW.
I'm not following here. The idea is to cut off their air so they retract their teeth.

JPH
05-09-2005, 11:45
Excellent point, I use a lot because I am not hiding from anyone… I was only thinking that a very small amount could be used with out the smell on feet and stuff. Only a professional would know if it smells more or less that normal multiple-day BO and if it would compromise anything. If anyone has any experience with this, let us know if this is a feasible idea. And if it wont work in the field, then it still works on your weekend backpacking trips with the kids.

JPH

The Reaper
05-09-2005, 11:49
JPH,
That is a good idea and it works - for civilians - do you really think a soldier should be wandering around in the woods reeking of sulfur?

Good point!

Only if it is from gunpowder. :D

Actually, the Chigg-Away works pretty well. I would stay off the veterinary Tick and Flea collars and the like, they have some nasty side effects.

Ticks have the nasty habit of dropping on you from elevated vegetation when you pass by, so they do not always climb up the boots, but I would consider putting bug juice and Chigg-Away on the outside of the boots to take that out of the equation. If you have to try a tick and flea collar, I would put it on the outside of my boot at the ankle, never in touch with skin.

The self-checks and buddy checks are the best way.

TR

mumbleypeg
05-09-2005, 12:28
I spend some time on a Tick farm in Arkansas. We use Coulstons with Permethrin. I don't know what the current military issue is, the Coulstons you spray on your gear, let it dry and it will work( the label says for 2 weeks). I have stayed tick free using it for days before reapplying.

We use nail polish and tweezers when we need to extract. Just be thorough, as mentioned above.

The Reaper
05-09-2005, 12:30
I spend some time on a Tick farm in Arkansas.

Near the Leech pond?

TR

Archangel
05-09-2005, 14:31
Hey thanks for the advice everyone.

I spend some time on a Tick farm in Arkansas. We use Coulstons with Permethrin. I don't know what the current military issue is, the Coulstons you spray on your gear, let it dry and it will work( the label says for 2 weeks). I have stayed tick free using it for days before reapplying.

We use nail polish and tweezers when we need to extract. Just be thorough, as mentioned above.
I'll check into Coulstons.







Say... is it just me or is it just really itchy in here?

*Scratch*

*Scratch*

:mad:

mumbleypeg
05-09-2005, 14:57
Near the Leech pond?

TR


I didn't start out to be around so many parasites. I just got lucky. :D

Huey14
05-09-2005, 22:36
I'm not following here. The idea is to cut off their air so they retract their teeth.


What I was meaning was, would your method still work if you put it on the skin directly above where they are, if they are fully embedded inside. If that makes any sense.

72_Wilderness
05-09-2005, 23:13
Yea Honor, are tick bites suppose to itch after the entire tick is removed? The tick was on my leg for over 18 hours before I discovered why I was itching. I would just scratch at it and go on. (I know it was a dumb thing to do now.) That was on April 23, the itching still comes and goes, less now than a few days ago.

A bath in bleach or finger nail polish will get rid of chiggers.

NousDefionsDoc
05-09-2005, 23:17
No, go see a Doc or your Medic.

hoepoe
05-10-2005, 01:29
I'm not following here. The idea is to cut off their air so they retract their teeth.

Hello all

If the point s to cut off the air, why not try clingwrap on the area? Not wrap the whole area, but rather pull it tight on the skin to make a temporary seal.

I believe this used in hospitals to get leeches to come up for air, and then do a Henry VIII on them :-)

Seriousely, it may work.

Hoepoe

AngelsSix
05-22-2005, 21:28
Ticks tend to be bad here in NC and we used to get covered in them out on L.I. too (can you say tick research at Plum Island??)......may parents always used to get Vasiline on them and for the most part they would come right out on their own with no ill effects afterward. The last two ticks I had I pulled out with tweezers (one was in a really bad spot) and both times I had those spots itching for over a week. I am sure that pulling them out with tweezers will irritate the tick as much as anything else and have found that Vasiline is the lesser of two evils. If you are in doubt about whether you can safely remove ALL of the tick, go to the doc so they can get a magnifying lense over it and remove it properly for you.
The one tick I had in the spot I couldn't readily see only was found after I started feeling ill (flu like symptoms) and felt a weird twinge in that spot. I thought I had cut myself shaving or something. If not for the twinge, who knows how long he would have been there. I started to feel better after I pulled it out, but kept the thing in a ziplock bag in my freezer for a few weeks afterward just in case I had to go to the doc. I did identify it as one of the Lone Star ticks that carry Lyme disease. I was lucky that I didn't get sicker. Also, check out this (http://www.lymenet.org/pictures.shtml) link for tick ID and symptoms of Lyme disease.

lksteve
05-22-2005, 21:39
i still think TR had the best solution...you just want to be selective on bayonet size...

FrankS
06-21-2005, 00:17
I am sorry gentlemen but this is seriously cracking me up, I had a similiar situation when I was 10 living with my grandmother who could not help me so she had the neighbor lady come over and remove it, talk about scarring for life, I did not know the neighbor lady LOLOL. The question I have is was it really neccessary to point out (the TICK)Put a little nail polish or Vaseline on the little bastard (the tick), then about 15 minutes later, pull him off (the tick) with a slow steady pull. Don't break the head or mouth (of the tick) off. And what are SF guys doing with clear nail polish? :D

Be gentle... Frank

The Reaper
06-21-2005, 00:45
And what are SF guys doing with clear nail polish? :D

Be gentle... Frank

Chigger killer med.

TR

Guy
06-22-2005, 16:38
Sounds like "crabs" to me...

Take care.

Bill Harsey
06-22-2005, 16:44
Sounds like "crabs" to me...

Take care.
You mean, "Graybacks", "Seam Squirrels" or "Livestock"?

These are all old logging terms for the critters you speak of Guy. :D

Warrior-Mentor
06-22-2005, 19:09
DISCLAIMER: THIS IS NOT MEDICAL ADVICE AND IS PROVIDED FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY.
USER ASSUMES OWN RISK FOR SELF-TREATMENT. SEE A MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL.

Now that we've got that out of the way (BTW How'd I do ABNL & Roguish Lawyer?)

PREVENTION. An ounce of Prevention is worth a pound of Cure.
Here's some of the tricks I used before going into critter country:

- Permithrin. Pre-treat your Uniforms with it.

- Flea & Tick Collar. Put one in your pocket (nothing that touches the skin).

- Bug Spray (Deep Woods OFF, etc) around your ankles, waist, fly(zipper), chest buttons and neckline and head...basically any area that is exposed or where they can crawl into you to reach skin. Spray your hat as well.

EARLY INTERVENTION. Conduct tick checks on a regular basis (at least once every 12 hours). Make it a habit to check yourself out thoroughly. Have a buddy check areas you can see like your back. This early in the game a good set of tweasers will get them out easily. Spend the money on a good set (not the Wal-maart specail, go with a $7+ set with a narrow head...makes it easier to see what you are grabbing and get the head of the little bastards.

LATE INTERVENTION. Depends where you are and who's around to help. In garrison or at home, see a Doc, PA or 18D. Get professional help if available. If you're in the back woods, you'll have to make the call. In the event you decide to be Rambo and cut it out to treat yourself, clean it with alcohol, bandage cleanly and get it checked at first opportunity. Continue to check and clean it at least every 12 hours until you can get it checked by a Doc.

Hope this helps,
Warrior-Mentor

AngelsSix
06-26-2005, 18:58
Now you jinxed me and I am NOT happy about it!!! :mad:
We were out playing OP4 the other day and I looked down to see ticks SWARMING all over me. Most of them were babies, really tiny. Damn near lost my mind. I ended up pulling three off my left leg and one out of my right armpit. And yes, they do leave nasty bumps and itch for a couple of weeks. This has happened to me the last two times I have been bitten. Much like a mosquito bit, but a longer lasting itchy effect. Reminds me of a spider bite, as a matter of fact.

hellokitty
07-07-2005, 04:29
Hi all, the area i live in is rather well infested with ticks and as such i have removed quite a few, a little known trick is to pull the tick out in a counter clockwise direction as when they go in it is in a clockwise manner , for after care euchalyptus oil is the way to go , it is a natural anti septic and smells nice to boot , also dont forget ticks are carriers of lyme disease so anti biotics may also be a smart move if the ticks have been on you for a un determined amount of time. all the best. kitty

Archangel
07-11-2005, 20:57
Now you jinxed me and I am NOT happy about it!!! :mad:
We were out playing OP4 the other day and I looked down to see ticks SWARMING all over me. Most of them were babies, really tiny. Damn near lost my mind. I ended up pulling three off my left leg and one out of my right armpit. And yes, they do leave nasty bumps and itch for a couple of weeks. This has happened to me the last two times I have been bitten. Much like a mosquito bit, but a longer lasting itchy effect. Reminds me of a spider bite, as a matter of fact.
Nasty bumps for a few weeks? It's been over 2 & a half months & I still have nasty dark looking bumps from where they bit me. I'm about to go to AT this week & they're going to be out there in full force!

If I can make it through these next two weeks w/o ending up on the menu, then I know I can make it through the Q. :D

lksteve
07-11-2005, 21:02
If I can make it through these next two weeks w/o ending up on the menu, then I know I can make it through the Q. dayum, what would happen if you got a leech on you????????? :rolleyes:

AngelsSix
07-11-2005, 21:29
Mine are still itching, but they are healing...........I wonder if pulling them out leaves an infection........I asked my folks and they do not remember this happening with using Vasilene to make the ticks to back out
]

Dustin03
07-11-2005, 23:24
Nasty bumps for a few weeks? It's been over 2 & a half months & I still have nasty dark looking bumps from where they bit me. I'm about to go to AT this week & they're going to be out there in full force!

If I can make it through these next two weeks w/o ending up on the menu, then I know I can make it through the Q. :D

Same here, still have two dark areas on my body where I was bit. I'm bathing in "bug juice" and chig away before I show up

AngelsSix
07-11-2005, 23:42
I just finished a book about how the govt was experimenting with ticks as a disease vector..........imagine that.

Archangel
07-12-2005, 08:14
dayum, what would happen if you got a leech on you????????? :rolleyes:
I got rid of her months ago. :cool:

x SF med
06-29-2006, 11:52
Guys -
there is one 'jungle remedy' that was completely bypassed here. COL M, CPT might be able to back me up, but it worked for me in the lands of Lyme (TX, MA, NC, GA, NY, NJ, PA) - works for most bugs - chiggers, ticks, mosquitoes, flies.

match heads - po tt bid (for nonmedics - by mouth 2 tabs twice a day) takes 2 days to load the phosphorus and sulfur into the sweat, no harmful effects, no smell, and matches (I hope) still come in MREs.

I learned this trick from an SF CSM who swore by it - I used it and still swear by it.

Roguish Lawyer
06-29-2006, 11:57
no harmful effects

Really? :munchin

x SF med
06-29-2006, 14:30
Most of the mental effects were caused by SFQC as far as anybody's been able to tell - the match heads just keep the bugs away - I guess there could be harmful effects if the person using this Px method were allergic to either Sulfur or Phosphorus (not the white kind , everybody is allergic to that, ouch) - but those kinds of allergies would have excuded them from SF anyway since they are major components of gunpowder....

Karl.Masters
06-29-2006, 20:37
Docs - any risk associated with the use of flea collars?

If I remember this correctly, one of the theories on Gulf War Syndrome was the combination of DEET from insect repellent and Dursban from Flea and Tick collars combining to cause neurotoxicity & brain damage.


Karl

mugwump
06-29-2006, 21:42
Docs - any risk associated with the use of flea collars?

If I remember this correctly, one of the theories on Gulf War Syndrome was the combination of DEET from insect repellent and Dursban from Flea and Tick collars combining to cause neurotoxicity & brain damage.


Karl

Sir,

While there is still stonewalling by the federal government on this issue, the vaccine adjuvant squalene is considered to be the cause of Gulf War Syndrome (GWS), at least in my world. An adjuvant is a chemical added to a (usually weak) vaccine in order to make it more effective. It is presumed that squalene was added to the anthrax vaccine used in the DOD’s Anthrax Vaccine Immunization Program (AVIP).

There is much pulling of hair and gnashing of teeth over adding aduvants to the current crop of H5N1 vaccines. GWS is a cautionary tale which is frequently discussed.

Squalene is present in some proprietary adjuvants such as MF59 made by Chiron. Animal studies show squalene to be problematic and associated with autoimmune and neuro-muscular dysfunctions. It is not approved for use in the US.

Squalene antibodies (ASA) were discovered by researchers at Tulane university in veterans with GWS. This is significant because:

Squalene antibodies are not present in normal people, but present in 95% of GWS patients tested

The level of ASA antibodies corresponds with severity of GWS symptoms

Only veterans who were in the DOD’s Anthrax Vaccine Immunization Program AVIP tested positive

AVIP personnel who had GWS-like illnesses but not deployed also tested positive

There is a higher than normal incidence of autoimmune disorders in GWS, particularly striking being ones that are extremely rare in men, such as lupus

To date this test remains a ‘marker’ for GWS

Karl.Masters
06-30-2006, 18:17
While there is still stonewalling by the federal government on this issue, the vaccine adjuvant squalene is considered to be the cause of Gulf War Syndrome (GWS), at least in my world. An adjuvant is a chemical added to a (usually weak) vaccine in order to make it more effective. It is presumed that squalene was added to the anthrax vaccine used in the DOD’s Anthrax Vaccine Immunization Program (AVIP).



Mugwump,

Thanks for the information. The squalene/GWS connection is new to me. Some of the congressional testimony I've read through suggested multiple causes that included AVIP, combinations of organo-phosphates, effects of PB, chemical weapons exposure, DU effects, and even oil well fires. That's likely ancient history and it sounds like you have done some detailed research. It is interesting to know that such a high correlation of GWS to squalene exists. Is there a paper or a study that you can recommend to read more?

But back to Flea & Tick collars, which was also an early "marker" for GWS in some of Dr. Robert Haley's GWS research, think at UT.

What I'm interested in understanding is if I can kill brains cells if I combine DEET with the Flea Collars. I live way out in the sticks and now only use DEET and Sulphur, I have yet to check out the Flea Collar techinique.

I don't want to induce any more dain brammage than I already have:D

Thanks-

Karl

mugwump
06-30-2006, 19:12
Karl,

This site (http://www.autoimmune.com/GWSGen.html) has links to squalene research and congressional testimony.

I'm sure you're right that GWS has complex causes. Squalene antibodies are easily identified, which has made them something of a smoking gun. Because the H5N1 vaccines we are developing have 'disappointing serological response' (translation, they're crap) adjuvants are being used. The squalene/GWS link is in the front of my mind.

All I know about flea collars is that a CSM in A'stan asked me to stop sending them in care packages in 2004. He said they'd gotten a directive that they were not good to go.

mugwump

Karl.Masters
06-30-2006, 19:34
Mugwump,

Thanks for the link, I appreciate the leads for further reading on the GWS research. Learning that "better living through chemistry" not always the case.

Interesting about the reply you got from the CSM on the flea collars. Also noted earlier in the thread that TR and W-M both say avoid skin contact/put the collar in your pocket. That's three bad bongos data points. Good enough for me, I'll keep these things on the dogs.


Thanks-

Karl

SRT31B
07-01-2006, 11:14
Can't vouch for how effective this is versus good ol DEET, but and old SOG friend of mine said they used to take any of the plants in the milkweed family and rub the excretions on their clothes, hands, neck, etc. Suppossed to keep the bugs away as it is toxic to them and also helps to cover your body's scent. Worth a try I guess...

mconrad
07-06-2006, 22:28
Guys -
there is one 'jungle remedy' that was completely bypassed here. COL M, CPT might be able to back me up, but it worked for me in the lands of Lyme (TX, MA, NC, GA, NY, NJ, PA) - works for most bugs - chiggers, ticks, mosquitoes, flies.

match heads - po tt bid (for nonmedics - by mouth 2 tabs twice a day) takes 2 days to load the phosphorus and sulfur into the sweat, no harmful effects, no smell, and matches (I hope) still come in MREs.

I learned this trick from an SF CSM who swore by it - I used it and still swear by it.

Man that's crazy. So you're supposed to start eating match heads 2 days before you go out? And how long does it last?

x SF med
07-06-2006, 22:59
Man that's crazy. So you're supposed to start eating match heads 2 days before you go out? And how long does it last?

Lasts for about 2 days after you stop eating the match heads - 2 in the morning, 2 in the evening.

mconrad
07-06-2006, 23:42
Lasts for about 2 days after you stop eating the match heads - 2 in the morning, 2 in the evening.

Sounded more like an eating disorder at first. Thanks for the info, x_sf_med.

JMI
07-06-2006, 23:57
Wow, tics on the nads?

I am living a sheltered life.

But if I wasn't I would just read all of the multiple 18D posts and follow the advice.

This subject is making me all.........itchy.

The Reaper
07-07-2006, 08:51
I would mention, in the interest of health and safety, that safety match heads contain a number of chemicals, chiefly antimony sulfide and potassium chlorate.

If you want more sulfur in your diet, it is probably healthier to just buy some and take a little in capsules or something than to eat match heads. Me? I'll just stick with the Chig-Away which is a lotion containing sulfur.

BTW, the strike anywhere matches are even more dangerous due to the phosphorus, and excessive contact can lead to serious medical problems (see "Phossy Jaw"), including death.

Just my .02.

TR

x SF med
07-07-2006, 09:43
TR,
That's why just 2 paper matchheads twice a day - systemic sulfur is loaded, and the phosphorus level is controlled, but elevated to a level unappetizing for creepy crawlies, and normally not toxic for humans - as with any 'jungle' medicine - if you feel any effects - stop. I've had no ill effects, but that's not to say another's body chemistry isn't different enough to not tolerate this prophylaxis.

Whatever you are comfortable with, use - but always buddy check on a regular basis, nothing is 100%.

The Reaper
07-07-2006, 09:46
TR,
That's why just 2 paper matchheads twice a day - systemic sulfur is loaded, and the phosphorus level is controlled, but elevated to a level unappetizing for creepy crawlies, and normally not toxic for humans - as with any 'jungle' medicine - if you feel any effects - stop. I've had no ill effects, but that's not to say another's body chemistry isn't different enough to not tolerate this prophylaxis.

Whatever you are comfortable with, use - but always buddy check on a regular basis, nothing is 100%.

There is no phosphourus in a paper match. The phosphorus is in the striker (along with powdered glass), and is toxic.

Agreed on the buddy check. We were doing IADs in the Mata Mile area one day and in less than 2 hours, I picked up over 80 ticks of assorted sizes.

TR

FearMonkey
07-19-2006, 23:03
We had a couple match munchers at Phase II, but I could never get into it. I just used the type of DEET that corrodes your watch. It served two purposes... it kept the bugs off and the burning skin helped keep me awake. :o

6.8SPC_DUMP
05-18-2010, 13:33
Thanks for the professional insight. Ticks are rampant in the north east and this is some info gathered for off-duty time in the woods.

This page (http://www.lymeneteurope.org/info/deet-versus-permethrin-as-a-tick-repellent) gives some prevention tips. It claims that Permanone is much more effective on ticks than DEET.

Repel Permanone Clothing & Gear Insect Repellent (http://www.greatoutdoorsdepot.com/repel-permanone-clothing-repellant.html) was recommended:

"This odorless insecticide is designed to protected clothing, shoes, tents and other gear (not to be used on skin) from ticks and mosquitoes. Spray any item, let dry and Permanone will provide up to two weeks of protection (while hanging outside to avoid inhalation of vapors). Permanone will bind to the fabric being treated and actually kills insects that come in contact with it. Contains 0.5% Permethin."

Some people tuck their pant cuffs into their socks and even use duct tape to secure them. I’m thinking Under Armour or 5.11 Tactical socks would be best. There is also a product called Tick Gators (http://www.forestry-suppliers.com/product_pages/View_Catalog_Page.asp?mi=6954#) that serves this function.

I tuck in my shirt (long sleeved are best), wear a hat and throw them in the washer after if possible. No substitute for checking your hide.

Here is a training guide for Public Health Pest Management (http://pest.ca.uky.edu/PSEP/Manuals/ent63.pdf) that covers ticks.

This last paper did bring up possible health risks of Permanone –I’m not trying to give advice to our bravest about Lyme disease prevention.

Health Effects of Permethrin-Impregnated Army Battle-Dress Uniforms (1994) (http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=9274)

DI-BLUE
05-19-2010, 13:23
but it worked for me in the lands of Lyme (TX, MA, NC, GA, NY, NJ, PA) - works for most bugs - chiggers, ticks, mosquitoes, flies.



Don't forget Connecticut, the first cases in the US were discovered in the towns of Lyme and Old Lyme, Connecticut in 1975.

One of our many great contributions to the US, along with the Connecticut compromise and Hosmer Mountan Soda. :D

JimP
05-19-2010, 13:46
ONLY sure way to get rid of them is the following: shave your junk - REAL close. Then, ensure you scrub affected area till the skin is red and raw. Next, fill a mason jar with turpentine. All that remains is for you to "dip your junk in the mug". Trust me - you won't even THINK about that tick for quite a while. Works great.....also works real well for crotch-pheasants and assorted venereal maladies.

Tried the match-head stuff back in the day. Not sure it worked. Also tried loading up on brewers yeast. Seemed to work real well (but tough to prove a negative or to assess linkage to the remedy).

incarcerated
05-19-2010, 23:04
Have you tried this?

That’s why you’re an attorney. :D:D

mark46th
05-22-2010, 10:33
I have noticed that more than few have referred to "Chiggers". I believe the correct term, in order to maintain Political Correctness, is "Chigroes"...

Pete E
06-03-2010, 12:55
Gents,

I'm not sure it would help with Ticks that are fully buired under the skin, but the
"special tick tweezers" below known as the "Fastingplockare Tick1" are but far the best device I've seen or tried to remove ticks without leaving their feeding parts behind.

http://www.jaktojagare.se/upload/article/bild/7/201539/tabort_s.jpeg

Although the translation of the name infers they are a tweezers, thats not stricktly correct as they have a very fine "loop" formed at the tips that can be drawn over the tick and used to "encourage" it to let go...

Tick Remover Available Here (http://www.jaktojagare.se/se/article.php?id=201539)

Regards,

Peter

Blitzzz (RIP)
06-03-2010, 16:27
Use a Q-Tip and dab on Hydrogen Peroxide on each tick. Get the peroxide on the tick...

greentick
01-05-2011, 00:31
I have noticed that more than few have referred to "Chiggers". I believe the correct term, in order to maintain Political Correctness, is "Chigroes"...

red-bug americans

greentick
01-05-2011, 00:36
Seriously tho, this thing works great.

http://www.rei.com/product/407279

Weighs nothing, easy to clean (use one of those matchheads, still attached to the match), fool proof.

Pulled several ticks off my dogs and a couple off of me as well. Head comes right out with the body.

Earl_J
09-15-2011, 12:56
I had a bout of chiggers once - 40 or so years ago right here in NC...
Learned my lesson... I now wear two or three flea and tick collars on any extended stay in the woods. I would wear one in each blouse of my boots - outside my socks and tucked inside the blouse not to touch any skin... I pull the blouse down over the tops of my boots. If the loop is longer than required, I trim the ends into shorter pieces an inch or so long and place them in pockets and pouches of the rucksack.
I also wear a third one looped between two or three belt loops on the back of my trousers... never had a problem after that.
Chiggers look for places of constriction; boot tops and belt line... don't ask me why...

The trick is not to wear the collars in any spot where they can contact the skin or come into contact with your hands or face during the normal daily routine.

I scratched at night (in my sleep) until I had holes in my calves about an inch across... they were very nasty... I still have the scars; although faded somewhat.
* * *
On a side note, perhaps that squalene connection might be our modern day version of sitting out in the sand in Nevada during a nuclear detonation...
We seriously injure our own military in the name of research and combat safety ... (sigh) through simple ignorance, and the irresistible desire to see how close we can get to the train before getting decapitated...

God bless both groups of dedicated military members 60 years apart for their service and sacrifice ...
* * *

"Born on Valley Isle,
Home now, North Carolina;
Aloha y'all..."



Until that time ... Earl J.

Pete
09-15-2011, 13:16
........ had a bout of chiggers once - 40 or so years ago right here in NC................

Until that time ... Earl J.....................

Earl;

Didn't I give you something to copy a couple of years ago? Couple of 5th Group year books from the 1970s?

Anyway - no slack given to anyone. Trot on over to the intro thread and make your next post there.

Pete

Earl_J
09-16-2011, 07:16
Yes, I seem to recall something of that nature about that time...

Did I mention that I don't remember being this forgetful when I was younger?
* * *
I thought I did fix my profile... I'll go check...
I certainly don't want to appear uncooperative ... I really am; I just don't want to appear that way... (grin)

Until that time ... Earl J.

Earl_J
09-16-2011, 07:22
Oh...
the Intro thread... gee whiz...

JMonty
06-10-2012, 12:02
And what are SF guys doing with clear nail polish? :D



If it works...