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Spartan74
03-31-2005, 15:12
I have been studying Portuguese on and off for a couple years now. I've spent about 6 months in Brazil over the past 5 years and feel comfortable with the language but definitely not fluent. I would rate my proficiency of understanding about 80% spoken conversation....50% television...don't have too many problems ordering things over the telephone. I have a pretty good grasp of the basics but I am definitely continuing my studies.

Having given a little background info, my question is what advice can anyone give regarding studying basic spanish concurrently with advanced level Portuguese?
Would you reccomend becoming absolutely perfect in Portuguese before taking on Spanish or is it reasonable to begin basic Spanish at the same time? Also, I work with a lot of Mexicans, so I have a great oppurtunity to practice. Any advice is much appreciated. Thanks.

NousDefionsDoc
03-31-2005, 15:35
You will confuse the two. I would switch to Spanish. Not very many people speak Portagee, but if you understand Spanish or Italian, you can understand it.

Peregrino
03-31-2005, 16:25
You will confuse the two. I would switch to Spanish. Not very many people speak Portagee, but if you understand Spanish or Italian, you can understand it.

NDD is right about the probability of confusion. Spanish and Portugese are very similar. I've had the difference explained to me as Portugese being an archaic form of Spanish. (Something I'm sure the Portugese will resent.) Stick with the language that's going to be more useful in the long run. In today's world that means Spanish. And don't confuse street Mexican with educated Spanish. Learn the quality, root language and get it right the first time. All of the sub-groups understand the "mother tongue", none of them will admit to understanding each other. (Try getting a Mexican to interpret for a Puerto Rican - or vice versa!) You'll have a lifetime to pick up regional dialects but if you start there you'll always be marked if you try to cross over between the various subcultures - something that can be a handicap in our line of work. Something like a "Down Easter' in Mobile, or a "Valley Girl" anywhere. FWIW - Peregrino

Dustin03
03-31-2005, 16:57
so while on the topic, any advice on a language to pick up for a 20th grp guy? I'm kinda bored and thought about learning an extra language just for kicks and giggles. i did take a year of french my freshman year of HS, super easy.

frostfire
03-31-2005, 22:01
Extra language? Will you take advice of any kind?

Well then, learn Chinese/Mandarin
It's moving fast to be (or it is already) the 2nd international language, especially in trade & outsourcing, and other means of globalization

504PIR
04-01-2005, 08:01
Chinese is an excellant choice and a good career enhancer. I believe we need a bunch speakers as....the Red Chinese are our new rival...more dangerous than the Islamic terrorist..IMHO

NousDefionsDoc
04-01-2005, 10:48
the Red Chinese are our new rival...more dangerous than the Islamic terrorist..IMHO

ghuinness is looking for CAS.

Target Coords (http://www.professionalsoldiers.com/forums/showthread.php?p=70154#post70154)

12B4S
04-03-2005, 03:41
I have been studying Portuguese on and off for a couple years now. I've spent about 6 months in Brazil over the past 5 years and feel comfortable with the language but definitely not fluent. I would rate my proficiency of understanding about 80% spoken conversation....50% television...don't have too many problems ordering things over the telephone. I have a pretty good grasp of the basics but I am definitely continuing my studies.

Having given a little background info, my question is what advice can anyone give regarding studying basic spanish concurrently with advanced level Portuguese?
Would you reccomend becoming absolutely perfect in Portuguese before taking on Spanish or is it reasonable to begin basic Spanish at the same time? Also, I work with a lot of Mexicans, so I have a great oppurtunity to practice. Any advice is much appreciated. Thanks.

Take all the advice you have been given to this point. When I served in SF in Germany. my team was sent to language school in O'gau. We were taught the proper (Hoch Deutsch). At that time there were 16 dialects of the German language. NONE, more different than between Hoch Deutsch and Bayerish. Have stories if you want.
Came down to this, ALL Germans learn Hoch Deutsch in school growing up. Whether they choose to use it down the road is thier decision. In Bavaria, they were and have always been proud. Going back to WW2. (That may open up some stuff). They understand Hoch Deutsch (proper German), BUT refuse to speak it. Enough of that, those previous posts were dead on.

Airbornelawyer
04-04-2005, 11:51
Take all the advice you have been given to this point. When I served in SF in Germany. my team was sent to language school in O'gau. We were taught the proper (Hoch Deutsch). At that time there were 16 dialects of the German language. NONE, more different than between Hoch Deutsch and Bayerish. Have stories if you want.
Came down to this, ALL Germans learn Hoch Deutsch in school growing up. Whether they choose to use it down the road is thier decision. In Bavaria, they were and have always been proud. Going back to WW2. (That may open up some stuff). They understand Hoch Deutsch (proper German), BUT refuse to speak it. Enough of that, those previous posts were dead on.Bavarian pride goes back well before World War Two. Bavaria was an independent kingdom, a rival to Prussia and a Catholic state in a heavily Protestant country.

Bavaria was established as a duchy in the late 8th Century. In 1180, the Holy Roman Emperor gave the duchy to Otto von Wittelsbach, whose family would rule Bavaria until 1918.

During the Reformation, many German states converted to Lutheranism, but Bavaria remained staunchly Catholic. Duke Maximilian I of Bavaria headed the Catholic League in the Thirty Years' War, and during his reign, the Duke of Bavaria became an elector (Kurfürst) of the Holy Roman Empire. Bavaria allied with Napoleon and when Napoleon dissolved the Holy Roman Empire in 1806, Bavaria was elevated to a kingdom. Bavaria changed sides in 1813, and lost almost none of its territory after the Congress of Vienna in 1815, although its status was lessened as Prussia and Austria became the main rivals for German leadership.

Under King Maximilian II, Bavaria was known as a relatively liberal place, politically and culturally, and the king tried to form an alliance of the predominantly Catholic southern German states to rival Prussia. Unfortunately, he died in 1864, and was succeeded by a lunatic, Ludwig II, AKA "Mad King Ludwig". Also, in 1866 the southern states, led by Austria and Bavaria, were soundly defeated by Prussia and the northern states in the Seven Weeks' War.

Bavaria and all of the southern states except Austria joined the Prussian-led North German Confederation, which became the German Empire after the defeat of France in 1871. However, Bavaria retained more freedom than most of the other German states, including its own army. The Kingdom of Saxony also kept its own army, while all of the other German states' forces became part of the Prussian Army (Württemberg's was also nominally separate, but was effectively just a corps of the Prussian Army).

Defeat in World War One would lead to the abdication of King Ludwig III in 1918, ending 738 years of Wittelsbach rule. A short-lived socialist republic was crushed and Bavaria became a state of the Weimar Republic. It lost what autonomy it retained during the Third Reich, but the Free State of Bavaria (Freistaat Bayern) was created after World War Two.

Most German states today are the result of the break-up of Prussian lands or the mixing of smaller German states (Baden-Württemberg, for example, merged the Grand Duchy of Baden with the Kingdom of Württemberg). Only Bavaria is effectively the same state it was before the Nazi era.


By the way, bayerisch is not the most different German dialect from standard hochdeutsch. Lëtzebuergesch, the language spoken in Luxembourg, is further removed, as are plattdeutsch dialects like friesisch and Dutch, which are so different they are considered separate languages from German.

Actually, most of the plattdeutsch dialects of north Germany are not mutually intelligible with hochdeutsch, but unlike the south, most have given way to hochdeutsch. The dialects are still spoken in villages, but in the major north German cities like Hamburg, Bremen and Berlin, standard hochdeutsch is spoken. Among working class folk in places like Cologne, though, local dialects can still be heard (Kölsch is not just the local beer, but also the local language).

Swiss German, also known as Schwyzerdütsch, is an Alemannic (alemannisch) dialect and is also further removed from High German than bayerisch.

Also, bayerisch is the dialect of Munich, much of Austria, and the Alpenvorland, including places I'm sure you're familiar with like O'gau, Garmisch and Bad Tölz, but other parts of Bavaria speak different dialects. In the area between Nuremberg and Würzburg, Franconian (fränkisch) is spoken. Swabian (or schwäbisch), the main dialect of Württemberg, reaches as far as Augsburg. Swabian is the "hick" dialect of Germany, and Swabians are routinely the butt of jokes for their thick nasal accents and pig-farming. Field Marshal Erwin Rommel was a Swabian, and was known for his thick accent.

12B4S
04-05-2005, 22:30
Thanks for the information AL. Some of that history, I was aware of, most of it I was not. Our language teacher explained many of those dialects, you brought up. Although I was in northern Germany several times, I really didn't have the chance to get out amongst the locals. Most of my exposure was in Bavaria.

When the Team was sent to O'gau for language school, we commuted everyday, so most nights in Toelz I would be at a friend's restaurant/bar. I felt like I was learning two languages, Hochdeutsch during the day and Bavarian at night. I was fortunate to have several good friends from Toelz, plus one of the guys was married to a local gal. I sort of ended up learning and using both simultaneously.

Airbornelawyer
04-06-2005, 09:30
Thanks for the information AL. Some of that history, I was aware of, most of it I was not. Our language teacher explained many of those dialects, you brought up. Although I was in northern Germany several times, I really didn't have the chance to get out amongst the locals. Most of my exposure was in Bavaria.

When the Team was sent to O'gau for language school, we commuted everyday, so most nights in Toelz I would be at a friend's restaurant/bar. I felt like I was learning two languages, Hochdeutsch during the day and Bavarian at night. I was fortunate to have several good friends from Toelz, plus one of the guys was married to a local gal. I sort of ended up learning and using both simultaneously.
I wonder what it's like for foreign (and non-English-speaking Puerto Rican) students coming to the US who go to English-language school at Lackland AFB, Texas? Texas English is more an accent than a dialect, but it has to cause problems for some. Imagine if they moved the school to Fort Polk. :)

12B4S
04-06-2005, 22:53
I wonder what it's like for foreign (and non-English-speaking Puerto Rican) students coming to the US who go to English-language school at Lackland AFB, Texas? Texas English is more an accent than a dialect, but it has to cause problems for some. Imagine if they moved the school to Fort Polk. :)

Texas would be tough enough AL, just with the accent and idioms. Around Ft Polk or somewhere in the deep south, God help them. :eek: One advantage I had, was that most of the folks I knew in Toelz also spoke English. Without that, I would have learned very little bayerisch. Did notice one thing though. The more beer, the better I could speak both languages/dialects. :D

Airbornelawyer
04-07-2005, 11:30
Texas would be tough enough AL, just with the accent and idioms. Around Ft Polk or somewhere in the deep south, God help them. :eek: One advantage I had, was that most of the folks I knew in Toelz also spoke English. Without that, I would have learned very little bayerisch. Did notice one thing though. The more beer, the better I could speak both languages/dialects. :DI too have noticed that my fluency increases as I take in more fluids of the alcoholic variety.

For some, including me, this points to one of the biggest problems in language-learning, overcoming the inhibition of sounding stupid. And alcohol certainly helps you overcome inhibitions. Maybe they should add liquid lunches in the language labs.

Of course, overcoming the inhibition won't actually keep you from sounding stupid.

vsvo
04-07-2005, 12:33
For some, including me, this points to one of the biggest problems in language-learning, overcoming the inhibition of sounding stupid.That's interesting AL. I'd never heard that before but it explains a lot for me thinking back about learning different languages in school.

Regarding Texas, we lived in Houston for a year when I was in the fourth grade, before moving back to the northeast. I remember the first day in school after moving back, the kids asked me about my "southern" accent, when I didn't even realize I had acquired an accent (so now maybe I shouldn't be so hard on Madonna). To this day, "y'all" sounds more natural to me than "you all," which sounds awkward.

I did my b-school summer internship in London. I still remember clearly the first time someone at work asked me, "Where are you from with that American accent?" Maybe it was because they heard it coming out of an Asian dude, I don't know. :)

Airbornelawyer
04-07-2005, 14:36
Regarding Texas, we lived in Houston for a year when I was in the fourth grade, before moving back to the northeast. I remember the first day in school after moving back, the kids asked me about my "southern" accent, when I didn't even realize I had acquired an accent (so now maybe I shouldn't be so hard on Madonna). To this day, "y'all" sounds more natural to me than "you all," which sounds awkward.Harvard did a big study of American dialects a few years ago. Question 50 was "What word(s) do you use to address a group of two or more people?". 10,764 people responded:

- you guys (42.53%)
- you (24.82%)
- y'all (13.99%)
- you all (12.63%)
- yous, youse (0.67%)
- yins (0.37%)
- you 'uns (0.20%)
- you lot (0.18%)
- other (4.62%)

"you guys" was big in the Northeast, upper midwest and Pacific coast. Map here (http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_50_4.gif).

"you" had almost the same distribution. Map here (http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_50_7.gif).

"you all" was slightly less concentrated, but mainly in the same areas. Map here (http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_50_1.gif).

"y'all" was a Southern thing, but there are a lot of Northeasterners using it. Map here (http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_50_9.gif).

"youse" and "yous" was almost entirely New York/New Jersey area. Map here (http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_50_2.gif).

"yins" and "you 'uns" seem to be Pittsburgh dialects: "Yins" here (http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_50_6.gif) and "you 'uns" here (http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_50_5.gif).

"you lot" was scattered and too tiny a sample. Map here (http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_50_3.gif).

New Yorkers mainly use "you guys" (48.04%) and "you" (33.21%). "You all" was 9.10% and "y'all" was 5.24%.

Texans mainly use "y'all" (73.09%). "You guys" was a distant second at 11.40% and "you all" a distant third (8.78%). "You" was 5.17%.

jon448
04-07-2005, 15:43
AL,
Do you have any more info about that survey because it seems like the vast majority of the areas where there were any answers seemed to be concentrated around major cities. I know that it was a voluntary survey so its tough to always get a good spread but within a big city the movement of people from different regions could have caused a contamination of the survey.

Airbornelawyer
04-07-2005, 17:50
AL,
Do you have any more info about that survey because it seems like the vast majority of the areas where there were any answers seemed to be concentrated around major cities. I know that it was a voluntary survey so its tough to always get a good spread but within a big city the movement of people from different regions could have caused a contamination of the survey.It was an on-line voluntary survey, so there are a number of potential biases: the urban bias you note, plus probably a socioeconomic bias because you'd need Internet access to participate. Against these are a couple of things: it was a large sample (some 16,000 participants), a fair number of public school students participated, correcting somewhat for the socioeconomic bias, and it was anonymous (people tend to "correct" their English to what they consider proper forms when being interviewed, muting real regional variations in their normal speech).

It does seem skewered toward certain regions. The New England states are overrepresented, as are several Mid-Atlantic and several upper Midwest states. Southern, lower Midwest and Western states are generally underrepresented.

In most cases these aren't big differences, though. Massachusetts, which is 2.2% of the US population, had 4.2% of responses. Michigan, 3.5% of the population, had 6.7% of responses. Among underrepresented states, California, 12.2% of the population, had 9.3% of responses and Texas, 7.6% of the population, had 4.7% of responses. Some were neither over nor under, including Virginia (2.5% pop, 2.6% responses) and Ohio (3.9% pop, 3.9% responses).

The urban-suburban-rural split, though, is not recorded. I suspect the need for internet access biased the survey toward cities and suburbs, but I also suspect a fair number of respondents were college students, many of whom were in large urban areas (Boston, NYC, Phillie, Chicago), but many of whom were not (College Station, Ann Arbor).

Also, the urban/rural split doesn't always affect language surveys the same way. Large urban areas can both mute and reinforce language differences. The strongest English dialects are found in urban areas such as Brooklyn, Boston, Phillie, Pittsburgh and New Orleans as well as rural areas such as Mississippi and the Ozarks.

The biggest effect of this is probably seen in the survey's results for the question: "What do you call the long sandwich that contains cold cuts, lettuce, and so on?" This is one of the more well-known language variances in American English, but is skewered by urban dialects. "Hero (http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_64_4.gif)" is a New York City term, and "hoagie (http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_64_3.gif)" a Philadelphia phenomenon. "Grinder (http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_64_2.gif)" is a western New England term, while "sub (http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_64_1.gif)," the Boston term, dominates eastern New England and has become the generic American term. The New Orleans' "po' boy (http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/q_64_5.gif)" is a common variant in the Mississippi delta and along the Gulf coast.

Airbornelawyer
04-07-2005, 18:04
Oh, here is the list of questions. Each link leads to the maps for the answers to that question: http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/maps.html

Here is the list of states. Each link leads to the answers for each question for that state: http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FLL/linguistics/dialect/staticmaps/states.html

A result which showed some regional variance was Question 58, "Which of these terms do you prefer for a sale of unwanted items on your porch, in your yard, etc.?"

Overall, garage sale was the most common term (52.17%), with yard sale second (36.41%).

Garage sale was the main term in much of the Midwest - Iowa (71.7%), Illinois (70.3%), Kansas (83.4%), Michigan (64.4%), Minnesota (73.8%), Missouri (73.3%), Oklahoma (73.7%) - and West - California (63.6%), Colorado (70.5%), Oregon (66.7%), Washington (62.4%). It was also the main term in a couple of Southern states on the west side of the South, including Louisiana (74.8%) and Texas (79.4%)

Yard sale was the most common term in the South, for example Alabama (63.3%), Georgia (63.9%), Kentucky (74.0%), North Carolina (81.3%), Maryland (74.0%), South Carolina (67.6%), Virginia (75.0%) and West Virginia (72.5%). It was also, however, the most common term in New England, for example Massachusetts (67.6%), Maine (78.2%), New Hampshire (78.8%) and Rhode Island (73.5%).

Several states had no dominant term, including Florida (55.5% garage, 36.6% yard), New York (52.6% garage, 33.6% yard) and Arizona (49.7% yard, 41.4% garage)

There were two oddities though. In Wisconsin, 33.9% said rummage sale. In Connecticut, 68.9% said tag sale. In Massachusetts, tag sale reached 11.4%, but in no other state did rummage sale or tag sale get out of single digits.

Airbornelawyer
04-07-2005, 18:26
Another quirky one was question 74: "What do you call the little gray creature (that looks like an insect but is actually a crustacean) that rolls up into a ball when you touch it?"

Nationwide, and in most states, no single answer dominated.

In the South and parts of the Midwest, though, "roly-poly" was the clear winner. In the South, you have Alabama (87.7%), Florida (56.5%), Georgia (81.6%), Mississippi (88.7%), North Carolina (64.8%), South Carolina (78.1%), Tennessee (74.5%) and Virginia (55.3%). In the Midwest, you have Kansas (88.9%), Kentucky (53.5%), Michigan (47.4%), Missouri (79.4%) and Oklahoma (91.4%).

Potato bug was the term of choice in several Western states: Oregon (60.0%), Utah (75.9%) and Washington (56.3%).

In Louisiana and Texas, roly-poly competes with doodle bug. In California, roly-poly competes with pill bug. In Arizona and Maryland, potato bug competes with roly-poly. In Ohio and West Virginia, it is a three-way tie among potato bug, roly-poly and pill bug.

Apparently, these creatures don't like the cold. In the Northeast and other northern states, the most common answer was "I have no idea what this creature is." This was the case in Alaska, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Dakota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont and Wisconsin.

12B4S
04-08-2005, 00:02
Having been born and raised in a 'burb north of Chicago, I mostly use "you guys" however after my first year in the Army, most of which was in the south, "y'all" crept in, and has remained. Yep, roly- poly.

That was exactly why I found I could speak another language better AL. Especially when you are learning and you are in thier country. Plus by eliminating some of the apprehension one might have of totaly destroying thier language, vocab and grammar came easier. It's in there, we just think to hard in an effort to get it right, that being before adult beverages of course. :D

Bigblue
03-18-2008, 18:01
Good evening,

It has been a while since I have done more than skim over the board's topics. I decided to post here instead of starting a new thread. I have been doing some research and questioning on my own for a while now and am going to be in a position where I will have to decide fairly soon so I decided to come here and get some advice. Given the option of Spanish or Portuguese (and no other) which would you take? As a reservist they only offer the courses around once or year and the possibility of having to wait a while is high. In the meantime I have civilian life as well as Army schools I need to think about. I last scored an 85 on the DLAB if that matters.
From the Spanish speakers I hear that it is more "useful" than Portuguese with more opportunity to practice,etc... From the Portuguese speakers I hear that it is "harder" to learn but that it would be of more use down the line due to not many Soldiers being able to speak it. Also I notice on Gov. employment sites (like DIA) they all seem to list Portuguese as a language they are seeking (in addition to the other skillsets) but not Spanish. Also, I will be attending FLETC in Glynco and required to take a 5 week Spanish course there. I don't believe that would lead to any fluency but I am thinking that maybe it would be best to continue along that path even if it meant waiting a while for the next Spanish class to come around at DLI.
I would appreciate more opinions to take into account.

THANKS

SF_BHT
03-18-2008, 18:21
Good evening,

It has been a while since I have done more than skim over the board's topics. I decided to post here instead of starting a new thread. I have been doing some research and questioning on my own for a while now and am going to be in a position where I will have to decide fairly soon so I decided to come here and get some advice. Given the option of Spanish or Portuguese (and no other) which would you take? As a reservist they only offer the courses around once or year and the possibility of having to wait a while is high. In the meantime I have civilian life as well as Army schools I need to think about. I last scored an 85 on the DLAB if that matters.
From the Spanish speakers I hear that it is more "useful" than Portuguese with more opportunity to practice,etc... From the Portuguese speakers I hear that it is "harder" to learn but that it would be of more use down the line due to not many Soldiers being able to speak it. Also I notice on Gov. employment sites (like DIA) they all seem to list Portuguese as a language they are seeking (in addition to the other skillsets) but not Spanish. Also, I will be attending FLETC in Glynco and required to take a 5 week Spanish course there. I don't believe that would lead to any fluency but I am thinking that maybe it would be best to continue along that path even if it meant waiting a while for the next Spanish class to come around at DLI.
I would appreciate more opinions to take into account.

THANKS

Spanish vs Portuguese It is what it is..... People like DIA ask for Portuguese because there are a million Spanish speakers. You are limited to a small tgt group and will not have as many places to go to use it but when you are good and in the right job it can pay off.
FLETC ? Are you going to one of the Federal agencies academies/training? Depending on the agency will depend if you need to be fluent in Spanish. If you were going BP you have to speak Spanish but if you are ICE .... Hell they do not like to talk to anyone... (Another thread). I learned Spanish and travel to Brazil several times a year and I get along fine there. Lower pay for spanish but better locations and a lot of them.....
Just my 2cents....Hope it helps

Bigblue
03-18-2008, 19:14
I appreciate your 2 cents! Yes... I am going the Customs route (Miami) and that geo pref. requires the 5 week class then the normal 15 weeks. I "heard" that the Spanish immersion class enables you to say a lot of basic things (and understand when someone threatens you,etc...) but I dont see how 5 weeks can make someone Fluent. A friend of mine takes Portuguese college-level classes and is always complaining. Nobody around to practice with and those sorts of things. I am planning a trip down to Brazil for my 34th Birthday and see what happens, maybe I'll meet some people I can pick up a few things with then and get some practice. The next Portuguese class starts in July and isnt ending until Feb 09 the Spanish starts in September and ends in Apr 09. There is a chance I could get into the Spanish class that starts in June but it doesnt look promising from what I was told. I am hoping that whatever it winds up being it wont interfere with my EOD date with Customs.

Psywar1-0
03-18-2008, 19:42
I was already a 3/3 in Spanish(PRANG DLI) when I went to DLIMain for Portugese. I was able to breeze thru the course and got a 3/3/2 on the DLPT. My years of speaking Spanish is what caused me to not do so well on the Oral portion of the test.

My Instructor said the first day that Portugese was nothing more than a drunk Frenchman speaking Spanish:D

SF_BHT
03-19-2008, 08:52
I was already a 3/3 in Spanish(PRANG DLI) when I went to DLIMain for Portugese. I was able to breeze thru the course and got a 3/3/2 on the DLPT. My years of speaking Spanish is what caused me to not do so well on the Oral portion of the test.

My Instructor said the first day that Portugese was nothing more than a drunk Frenchman speaking Spanish:D

I agree but I always thought it had a bit of drunken German also.....

SF_BHT
03-19-2008, 09:01
I appreciate your 2 cents! Yes... I am going the Customs route (Miami) and that geo pref. requires the 5 week class then the normal 15 weeks. I "heard" that the Spanish immersion class enables you to say a lot of basic things (and understand when someone threatens you,etc...) but I dont see how 5 weeks can make someone Fluent. A friend of mine takes Portuguese college-level classes and is always complaining. Nobody around to practice with and those sorts of things. I am planning a trip down to Brazil for my 34th Birthday and see what happens, maybe I'll meet some people I can pick up a few things with then and get some practice. The next Portuguese class starts in July and isnt ending until Feb 09 the Spanish starts in September and ends in Apr 09. There is a chance I could get into the Spanish class that starts in June but it doesnt look promising from what I was told. I am hoping that whatever it winds up being it wont interfere with my EOD date with Customs.

Hell if you are in Miami you should get a lot of practice in Spanish. Immersion is the best way to really learn a language. You should get a lot of practice on the job as a CBP officer there. You are right 5 weeks is not enough and I laugh at some of the CBP how little they understand. Get into the marine ops and stay out of the airports there or you will go crazy. Do not expect high standards either when you get on the job. Most of them think of it as nothing more than a job. It is not going to be like the military. Good Luck.

Defion69
03-19-2008, 09:22
I grew up in Texas and did not learn Spanish here. I learned Spanish while in 7th Group and continued to hone my language skills while living in South America. I also live in Puerto Rico for 5 years and learned "Puerto Rican" (yes it is different). I recently returned to Texas and I would sum up the other language spoken to "Spanglish". Spanish (IMHO) has been butchered here in TX and there are words spoken and used that you will not find in the Spanish dictionary. So my point is: Learn proper Spanish and practice proper Spanish. Speaking with Mexicans may not be the best method for a new student given the English influence and the twists ingrained into "Mexican" Spanish (Puerto Rican as well). There are plenty of Spanish speaking channels on t.v. these days such as Telemundo and Univision and a good source to practice your listening skills.

I learned and studied French first and then Portuguese. Just like the other QPs already mentioned, they all mash together. I understand Portuguese fine but it gets interesting trying to converse and not throwing in too much Spanish or even French.

Ok I could go on but will stop so as not to bore too much with a lengthy thread :D

Good luck to ya'll learning a new language! :cool:

Take Care

calstyleee
06-07-2008, 09:51
i thought i would just ask in this thread instead of making a new one.

both my parents are Colombian, i speak fluent Spanish. would i go to 3rd group?

Surgicalcric
06-07-2008, 11:11
i thought i would just ask in this thread instead of making a new one.

both my parents are Colombian, i speak fluent Spanish. would i go to 3rd group?


From the looks of it you may need some remedial English grammar. Here is a hint, the first letter of the first word in a sentence should be capitalized. Remember you never have a second chance to make a first impression.

As for your question, language/Group assignment(s) have been discussed many times before and we arent going to rehash it for you. You will find most, if not all, your questions about SF have been asked before; use the search function.

SF is looking for men who are self-motivated, self sufficient, and self-starters.

Crip

The Reaper
06-07-2008, 15:11
i thought i would just ask in this thread instead of making a new one.

both my parents are Colombian, i speak fluent Spanish. would i go to 3rd group?


Let me guess.

You haven't read all of the stickies or used the Search button, right?

TR

60_Driver
06-23-2008, 18:02
I've worked with maybe a half-dozen Brazilian pilots in Latin America, and to a man their English was excellent...and their Spanish sucked.

The comparison to a drunken Frenchman speaking Spanish is about spot-on.