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booker
03-09-2005, 16:26
For those of you who have been there, done that, I have a somewhat simple yet, for me at least, important question to ask. Since I come from a non-CA background, my experience with this has been limited to Yakima Training Center and PLDC. When you are in a field environment, and you are, for example, doing the long range land nav course, what would be the optimal time/ instance to rest and/or change socks? I know that there are FMs that talk about this, but I was hoping to hear from the horse's mouth (so to speak).

J

Pete
03-09-2005, 16:36
It all depends on "YOUR" feet. Some people can go for days without changing socks while others have to change socks two - three times a day.

As long as your feet stay fairly dry and powdered with the nails trimmed right your feet will outlast your legs and back. Extened training/PT/Ruck marches will tell you how often you need to change socks and how many pair you need to carry.

Pete

booker
03-09-2005, 16:38
So what you are really saying is, that through some trial and some error (in training, not in a critical situation) I will be able to determine what is appropriate? (I figured there was no definite rule on this)

Pete
03-09-2005, 17:00
So what you are really saying is, that through some trial and some error (in training, not in a critical situation) I will be able to determine what is appropriate? (I figured there was no definite rule on this)

You will go through tons of training before you get to do real high spead/low drag stuff. You will find what works for you will not be what works for your buddy standing next to you.

Pay attention to what is working for you and what your body likes. How things fit and where they are placed. 0200 on the night land nav course is not the time to find out you made a mistake.

Pete

The Reaper
03-09-2005, 17:16
So what you are really saying is, that through some trial and some error (in training, not in a critical situation) I will be able to determine what is appropriate? (I figured there was no definite rule on this)

Not without a lot of miles under your feet.

Blisters are caused by poor conditioning and a lack of care. Focus on one will not make up for lack of attention to the other.

TR

booker
03-15-2005, 10:47
Well, I learned a great deal about foot care recently. Thought I had taken care of some hot spots, but the spot the size of a silver dollar on my heel says otherwise. In terms of if this ever happens again, and in the context of the gear you are allowed to take to SFAS, how should I address a heel sized blister?

The Reaper
03-15-2005, 10:56
Conditioning, foot care, footwear selection, and SA.

After the injury, moleskin, and intestinal fortitude.

You do know that the blister didn't just pop up, that it was wearing before then as a hotspot and you ignored it?

TR

Pete
03-15-2005, 10:57
....In terms of if this ever happens again, and in the context of the gear you are allowed to take to SFAS, how should I address a heel sized blister? :boohoo

I think you failed to read TRs post just above yours. Go back and re-read all the posts about gear for SFAS, get your boots well worn in (1/2 way) like they say and get your feet in shape by pounding out some serious cross country/through the woods miles.

One of the Mutts will be along soon and chew your leg off at the hip :munchin One of the Jeffs out.

Pete

Damn, people are quick today TR. The look on the face of somebody limping in 5 minutes late is something to see. A big blister is just a few more points off the chances of a young lad's passing. Best for him to get everything in shape first.

booker
03-15-2005, 12:42
I read TR's post, too late though, I didn't get to it until well after it happened. I am sure there was a hot spot, but I just failed to recognize it. Lesson learned.