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Brush Okie
05-02-2017, 10:21
An interesting article by a cardiac surgeon.

http://myscienceacademy.org/2012/08/19/world-renown-heart-surgeon-speaks-out-on-what-really-causes-heart-disease/



World Renowned Heart Surgeon Speaks Out On What Really Causes Heart Disease

We physicians with all our training, knowledge and authority often acquire a rather large ego that tends to make it difficult to admit we are wrong. So, here it is. I freely admit to being wrong. As a heart surgeon with 25 years experience, having performed over 5,000 open-heart surgeries,today is my day to right the wrong with medical and scientific fact.

World Renowned Heart Surgeon Speaks Out On What Really Causes Heart Disease

I trained for many years with other prominent physicians labelled “opinion makers.” Bombarded with scientific literature, continually attending education seminars, we opinion makers insisted heart disease resulted from the simple fact of elevated blood cholesterol.

The only accepted therapy was prescribing medications to lower cholesterol and a diet that severely restricted fat intake. The latter of course we insisted would lower cholesterol and heart disease. Deviations from these recommendations were considered heresy and could quite possibly result in malpractice.

It Is Not Working!

These recommendations are no longer scientifically or morally defensible. The discovery a few years ago that inflammation in the artery wall is the real cause of heart disease is slowly leading to a paradigm shift in how heart disease and other chronic ailments will be treated.

The long-established dietary recommendations have created epidemics of obesity and diabetes, the consequences of which dwarf any historical plague in terms of mortality, human suffering and dire economic consequences.

Despite the fact that 25% of the population takes expensive statin medications and despite the fact we have reduced the fat content of our diets, more Americans will die this year of heart disease than ever before.

Statistics from the American Heart Association show that 75 million Americans currently suffer from heart disease, 20 million have diabetes and 57 million have pre-diabetes. These disorders are affecting younger and younger people in greater numbers every year.

Simply stated, without inflammation being present in the body, there is no way that cholesterol would accumulate in the wall of the blood vessel and cause heart disease and strokes. Without inflammation, cholesterol would move freely throughout the body as nature intended. It is inflammation that causes cholesterol to become trapped.

Inflammation is not complicated — it is quite simply your body’s natural defence to a foreign invader such as a bacteria, toxin or virus. The cycle of inflammation is perfect in how it protects your body from these bacterial and viral invaders. However, if we chronically expose the body to injury by toxins or foods the human body was never designed to process,a condition occurs called chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation is just as harmful as acute inflammation is beneficial.

What thoughtful person would willfully expose himself repeatedly to foods or other substances that are known to cause injury to the body? Well,smokers perhaps, but at least they made that choice willfully.

The rest of us have simply followed the recommended mainstream diet that is low in fat and high in polyunsaturated fats and carbohydrates, not knowing we were causing repeated injury to our blood vessels. This repeated injury creates chronic inflammation leading to heart disease, stroke, diabetes and obesity.

Let me repeat that: The injury and inflammation in our blood vessels is caused by the low fat diet recommended for years by mainstream medicine.

What are the biggest culprits of chronic inflammation? Quite simply, they are the overload of simple, highly processed carbohydrates (sugar, flour and all the products made from them) and the excess consumption of omega-6 vegetable oils like soybean, corn and sunflower that are found in many processed foods.

Take a moment to visualize rubbing a stiff brush repeatedly over soft skin until it becomes quite red and nearly bleeding. you kept this up several times a day, every day for five years. If you could tolerate this painful brushing, you would have a bleeding, swollen infected area that became worse with each repeated injury. This is a good way to visualize the inflammatory process that could be going on in your body right now.

Regardless of where the inflammatory process occurs, externally or internally, it is the same. I have peered inside thousands upon thousands of arteries. A diseased artery looks as if someone took a brush and scrubbed repeatedly against its wall. Several times a day, every day, the foods we eat create small injuries compounding into more injuries, causing the body to respond continuously and appropriately with inflammation.

While we savor the tantalizing taste of a sweet roll, our bodies respond alarmingly as if a foreign invader arrived declaring war. Foods loaded with sugars and simple carbohydrates, or processed with omega-6 oils for long shelf life have been the mainstay of the American diet for six decades. These foods have been slowly poisoning everyone.

How does eating a simple sweet roll create a cascade of inflammation to make you sick?

Imagine spilling syrup on your keyboard and you have a visual of what occurs inside the cell. When we consume simple carbohydrates such as sugar, blood sugar rises rapidly. In response, your pancreas secretes insulin whose primary purpose is to drive sugar into each cell where it is stored for energy. If the cell is full and does not need glucose, it is rejected to avoid extra sugar gumming up the works.

When your full cells reject the extra glucose, blood sugar rises producing more insulin and the glucose converts to stored fat.

What does all this have to do with inflammation? Blood sugar is controlled in a very narrow range. Extra sugar molecules attach to a variety of proteins that in turn injure the blood vessel wall. This repeated injury to the blood vessel wall sets off inflammation. When you spike your blood sugar level several times a day, every day, it is exactly like taking sandpaper to the inside of your delicate blood vessels.

While you may not be able to see it, rest assured it is there. I saw it in over 5,000 surgical patients spanning 25 years who all shared one common denominator — inflammation in their arteries.

Let’s get back to the sweet roll. That innocent looking goody not only contains sugars, it is baked in one of many omega-6 oils such as soybean. Chips and fries are soaked in soybean oil; processed foods are manufactured with omega-6 oils for longer shelf life. While omega-6’s are essential -they are part of every cell membrane controlling what goes in and out of the cell — they must be in the correct balance with omega-3’s.

If the balance shifts by consuming excessive omega-6, the cell membrane produces chemicals called cytokines that directly cause inflammation.

Today’s mainstream American diet has produced an extreme imbalance of these two fats. The ratio of imbalance ranges from 15:1 to as high as 30:1 in favor of omega-6. That’s a tremendous amount of cytokines causing inflammation. In today’s food environment, a 3:1 ratio would be optimal and healthy.

To make matters worse, the excess weight you are carrying from eating these foods creates overloaded fat cells that pour out large quantities of pro-inflammatory chemicals that add to the injury caused by having high blood sugar. The process that began with a sweet roll turns into a vicious cycle over time that creates heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and finally, Alzheimer’s disease, as the inflammatory process continues unabated.

There is no escaping the fact that the more we consume prepared and processed foods, the more we trip the inflammation switch little by little each day. The human body cannot process, nor was it designed to consume, foods packed with sugars and soaked in omega-6 oils.

There is but one answer to quieting inflammation, and that is returning to foods closer to their natural state. To build muscle, eat more protein. Choose carbohydrates that are very complex such as colorful fruits and vegetables. Cut down on or eliminate inflammation- causing omega-6 fats like corn and soybean oil and the processed foods that are made from them.

One tablespoon of corn oil contains 7,280 mg of omega-6; soybean contains 6,940 mg. Instead, use olive oil or butter from grass-fed beef.

Animal fats contain less than 20% omega-6 and are much less likely to cause inflammation than the supposedly healthy oils labelled polyunsaturated. Forget the “science” that has been drummed into your head for decades. The science that saturated fat alone causes heart disease is non-existent. The science that saturated fat raises blood cholesterol is also very weak. Since we now know that cholesterol is not the cause of heart disease, the concern about saturated fat is even more absurd today.

The cholesterol theory led to the no-fat, low-fat recommendations that in turn created the very foods now causing an epidemic of inflammation. Mainstream medicine made a terrible mistake when it advised people to avoid saturated fat in favor of foods high in omega-6 fats. We now have an epidemic of arterial inflammation leading to heart disease and other silent killers.

What you can do is choose whole foods your grandmother served and not those your mom turned to as grocery store aisles filled with manufactured foods. By eliminating inflammatory foods and adding essential nutrients from fresh unprocessed food, you will reverse years of damage in your arteries and throughout your body from consuming the typical American diet.

Trapper John
05-02-2017, 11:09
Absolutely correct! And finally the medical research community has come around to that realization.

I have published on that point as it relates to chronic diseases and it is clear that inflammation is driving the pathology of these diseases. I have said that they are all the same disease, only the clinical symptoms change depending upon the tissue/organ involvement. Putting that in other words - diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease are the same disease!

What we have discovered is the central signaling pathway that controls the process, i.e. the "on-off" switch. We have developed a drug candidate to turn the switch "off" and we expect to be in clinical trials with it next year.

Recognizing that chronic diseases account for 75% of all health care costs in the US, I think it's high time we focus on drug development that alters the course of these diseases. The net effect will be to reduce the number of patient-years using health care and that's real health care reform! Who and how its paid for is of secondary concern.

Sine Pari

PRB
05-02-2017, 11:25
Thanks for that post....I am forwarding to friends.

RCummings
05-02-2017, 11:40
I am not in the medical profession but, I did spend a few days getting a stent and a triple bypass. The information posted is spot on. I would also suggest being aware of NSAID, do some research on the effects. The saying that has stuck with me is, "Don't eat anything that grandma wouldn't recognize". My granny was born in 1900. Take care of yourself.

V/R

Bob

Brush Okie
05-02-2017, 11:44
Absolutely correct! And finally the medical research community has come around to that realization.

I have published on that point as it relates to chronic diseases and it is clear that inflammation is driving the pathology of these diseases. I have said that they are all the same disease, only the clinical symptoms change depending upon the tissue/organ involvement. Putting that in other words - diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease are the same disease!

What we have discovered is the central signaling pathway that controls the process, i.e. the "on-off" switch. We have developed a drug candidate to turn the switch "off" and we expect to be in clinical trials with it next year.

Recognizing that chronic diseases account for 75% of all health care costs in the US, I think it's high time we focus on drug development that alters the course of these diseases. The net effect will be to reduce the number of patient-years using health care and that's real health care reform! Who and how its paid for is of secondary concern.

Sine Pari

Thanks for the info. I never have been a fan of the statin drugs for many reasons including no proof of increased survival rate and if I remember correctly 5% of people that take them have an increased clotting resulting in a stroke. I think it had something to do with the fibrin (sp)They did however make your labs look good.

Do you have a copy or a link of your paper that was published ?

PSM
05-02-2017, 12:29
I am not in the medical profession but, I did spend a few days getting a stent and a triple bypass. The information posted is spot on. I would also suggest being aware of NSAID, do some research on the effects. The saying that has stuck with me is, "Don't eat anything that grandma wouldn't recognize". My granny was born in 1900. Take care of yourself.

V/R

Bob


Six Rules For Eating Wisely
By Michael Pollan

TIME Magazine, June 4, 2006

Once upon a time Americans had a culture of food to guide us through the increasingly treacherous landscape of food choices: fat vs. carbs, organic vs. conventional, vegetarian vs. carnivorous. Culture in this case is just a fancy way of saying “your mom.” She taught us what to eat, when to eat it, how much of it to eat, even the order in which to eat it. But Mom’s influence over the dinner menu has proved no match for the $36 billion in food-marketing dollars ($10 billion directed to kids alone) designed to get us to eat more, eat all manner of dubious neofoods, and create entire new eating occasions, such as in the car. Some food culture.

I’ve spent the past five years exploring this daunting food landscape, following the industrial food chain from the Happy Meal back to the not-so-happy feedlots in Kansas and cornfields in Iowa where it begins and tracing the organic food chain back to the farms. My aim was simply to figure out what–as a nutritional, ethical, political and environmental matter–I should eat. Along the way, I’ve collected a few rules of thumb that may be useful in navigating what I call the Omnivore’s Dilemma.

Don’t eat anything your great-great-great grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food. Imagine how baffled your ancestors would be in a modern supermarket: the epoxy-like tubes of Go-Gurt, the preternaturally fresh Twinkies, the vaguely pharmaceutical Vitamin Water. Those aren’t foods, quite; they’re food products. History suggests you might want to wait a few decades or so before adding such novelties to your diet, the substitution of margarine for butter being the classic case in point. My mother used to predict “they” would eventually discover that butter was better for you. She was right: the trans-fatty margarine is killing us. Eat food, not food products.

Avoid foods containing high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS). It’s not just in cereals and soft drinks but also in ketchup and bologna, baked goods, soups and salad dressings. Though HFCS was not part of the human diet until 1975, each of us now consumes more than 40 lbs. a year, some 200 calories a day. Is HFCS any worse for you than sugar? Probably not, but by avoiding it you’ll avoid thousands of empty calories and perhaps even more important, cut out highly processed foods–the ones that contain the most sugar, fat and salt. Besides, what chef uses high-fructose corn syrup? Not one. It’s found only in the pantry of the food scientist, and that’s not who you want cooking your meals.

Spend more, eat less. Americans are as addicted to cheap food as we are to cheap oil. We spend only 9.7% of our income on food, a smaller share than any other nation. Is it a coincidence we spend a larger percentage than any other on health care (16%)? All this “cheap food” is making us fat and sick. It’s also bad for the health of the environment. The higher the quality of the food you eat, the more nutritious it is and the less of it you’ll need to feel satisfied.

Pay no heed to nutritional science or the health claims on packages. It was science that told us margarine made from trans fats is better for us than butter made from cow’s milk. The more I learn about the science of nutrition, the less certain I am that we’ve learned anything important about food that our ancestors didn’t know. Consider that the healthiest foods in the supermarket–the fresh produce–are the ones that don’t make FDA-approved health claims, which typically festoon the packages of the most highly processed foods. When Whole Grain Lucky Charms show up in the cereal aisle, it’s time to stop paying attention to health claims.

Shop at the farmers’ market. You’ll begin to eat foods in season, when they are at the peak of their nutritional value and flavor, and you’ll cook, because you won’t find anything processed or microwavable. You’ll also be supporting farmers in your community, helping defend the countryside from sprawl, saving oil by eating food produced nearby and teaching your children that a carrot is a root, not a machine-lathed orange bullet that comes in a plastic bag. A lot more is going on at the farmers’ market than the exchange of money for food.

How you eat is as important as what you eat. Americans are fixated on nutrients, good and bad, while the French and Italians focus on the whole eating experience. The lesson of the “French paradox” is you can eat all kinds of supposedly toxic substances (triple cream cheese, foie gras) as long as you follow your culture’s (i.e., mother’s) rules: eat moderate portions, don’t go for seconds or snacks between meals, never eat alone. But perhaps most important, eat with pleasure, because eating with anxiety leads to poor digestion and bingeing. There is no French paradox, really, only an American paradox: a notably unhealthy people obsessed with the idea of eating healthily. So, relax. Eat Food. And savor it.

Watch Pollen's "Cooked" if you can. I saw it on Netflix. There's a book, too.

My mother's side of the family is the one that I am more familiar with and all, except one heavy smoker, lived well into their nineties. One of my grandmother's sisters lived past 100 and her father died when I was 11 just a couple of months shy of 100 (and he was in the hospital because he slipped on the ice when walking to his office [the pool hall ;)] and broke his hip).

When I hear experts mention "nutritional advice" I think back to their dinner table. Every meal, including breakfast, had gravy. Everyone had their own butter dish. Except maybe cereal, nothing came out of a box and "canned" meant put up by my grandmother or the neighbors.

While I can't claim to religiously adhere to their diet, we come awfully close.

Pat

RCummings
05-02-2017, 13:05
PSM, will do, my wife and I do what we can and new, to us, information is always welcome. My life is much better with real butter and lard. White sugar, (refined?), Is a thing of the past, we use honey, molasses and pears for sweeteners. White sugar if I remember correctly has only been around since the 30's or 40's, (I want to say that information came from a Cambridge University reference book outlining the development), no sugar for me. To each their own.

V/R

Bob

Trapper John
05-02-2017, 13:24
For a primer see "Cells on Fire" Scientific American, June 2015. Sorry I couldn't upload it but send me a PM with your email if you can't access this from the Scientific American website and I will send you a copy. It's a pretty good summary. For more technical papers see the attached.

frostfire
05-02-2017, 13:36
That article came out in 2012-2013.
IIRC, this was when Whole Foods stock started to soar, people flocked to Chipotle, etc. So I thought Americans finally recognize the value of healthy eating. Sold my McDonalds stock at $95 then......
Still kicking myself 4 years later :boohoo

Not only price wise, but with food infused with substances that trigger endorphine, dopamine, serotonin, processed food is here to stay and to proliferate. When I used to stick neonate and babies, we used tootsweet which was pretty much sugar water. The soothing effect was remarkable and I used to joke to the parents that's it's like their having Krispy Kreme for the first time...or crack cocaine :D

FWIW, I am firm believer and observer of that study. Had a roommate who got Type 2 diabetes at 57 years old. He spent a year studying what happened to his body and showed me this study. 2 years later, he was insulin free with low a1c.

Still, typing this while munching sweet roll :D

Team Sergeant
05-02-2017, 14:15
Six Rules For Eating Wisely
By Michael Pollan



It's really simple, sugar in any form is your enemy. Sugar water (all soda) is extremely bad for you, break the chain and stop drinking it so your kids don't.

Processed foods, almost as bad as sugar. Don't buy them, ever! The list of chemicals used in processed foods are crazy.

Dairy, bad but I need a vice. :) I love cheese.