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frostfire
01-01-2017, 20:02
This year it's 12 through 18 March. So no more loading mags and squeezing with frozen finger! Also no more running* prior to shooting, so you shall witness late 30's and 40's POG and FAG kicking 20 yo 11 series arse :D
Now you can also change optics between stages (m68 and ACOG). Keep it mind the best overall rifle performance from long range to multigun was done by a certain unit SGM with a funeral detail A2 with irons. "It's the indian, not the arrow"

Fact sheet:
http://www.usaac.army.mil/amu/assets/2017_us_army_small_arms_championship_fact_sheet.pd f

EXSUM:
http://www.usaac.army.mil/amu/assets/2017_us_army_small_arms_championship_exsum.pdf

Changes:
http://www.usaac.army.mil/amu/assets/2017_all_army_program_(final).pdf

*The 1.5 mile run with kit and ammo prior to 25 yards pistol was my favorite. I think that's the only event I ever out shot everyone. Love the cussing and excuses thrown at the end for the "unfair" stage :D

Let me know if anyone wants to train up at Bragg

Toaster
01-04-2017, 17:12
Seriously considering going...but being away from gun for the year previous to that, and I only might make it back to the states in time for the match, it doesn't look good.

My thinking is that it'd probably be better for me to go to a rifle/carbine class, rather than not be able to perform well at the match. There's a 3 day course at TRC 17-19 March.

Since all courses on my leave are all on the same dates as the competition. I think the class is better in my case.

frostfire
01-05-2017, 22:43
For sure you will get better training at TRC.
I'm finding dates to take the active shooter/ccw training there myself.

However, if your unit sends you on order to Benning. With per diem and all, All Army would be best bang for your buck! The AMU does give excellent class on surgical pistol shooting

G2squared
03-10-2017, 23:40
If you can make it the All Army, it's well worth your time. The equipment allowed has evolved over the years to more closely match what's being used in training and issued. I still think mastering irons should be a prerequisite to using optics, but what do I know...

Below are two other courses I've taken with the AMU that they offer at other times and may be easier to justify as "Train the Trainer" than a competitive event like the All Army. They send you home with slide decks for the courses to take back and teach others in your unit. Helps the "bean counters" see benefits for the entire unit.

The CQM course includes both rifle and pistol shooting. My favorite statement from the instructors was, "You get your breaks when reloading magazines and never show up to the firing line with less than 4 magazines!"
Their SDM course demonstrates the difference in what matters and what doesn't in making an M16/M4 accurate. And if you can follow instructions, you will be engaging targets at 600+ from standing to prone faster than most engage 200m targets starting in the prone.

frostfire
03-18-2017, 23:32
If you can make it the All Army, it's well worth your time. The equipment allowed has evolved over the years to more closely match what's being used in training and issued. I still think mastering irons should be a prerequisite to using optics, but what do I know...

Below are two other courses I've taken with the AMU that they offer at other times and may be easier to justify as "Train the Trainer" than a competitive event like the All Army. They send you home with slide decks for the courses to take back and teach others in your unit. Helps the "bean counters" see benefits for the entire unit.

The CQM course includes both rifle and pistol shooting. My favorite statement from the instructors was, "You get your breaks when reloading magazines and never show up to the firing line with less than 4 magazines!"
Their SDM course demonstrates the difference in what matters and what doesn't in making an M16/M4 accurate. And if you can follow instructions, you will be engaging targets at 600+ from standing to prone faster than most engage 200m targets starting in the prone.

Absolutely concur with these 2 classes. I was talking with one instructor who spent 10 years in the regiment and he was very passionate in the SDM course (I finished top 7% and outshot him overall :D...but I got beat in multigun....)

All things considered, I am starting to see that the championship is just that, a competition and not a conducive learning environment. No crawl, walk, run there. It straight up fly. It serves its function best to reveal deficiency i.e. pistol, wind reading, CQM transition, and so on. I was horrified when the pit boss instructed us not to mark misses on EIC. How the hell one supposed to learn from mistakes? Still, I learned that at certain skill level one should have enough confidence to call dead rear sight/windage and do holdoff, instead of keep blaming self until 7 misses later :boohoo

Participation was poor and not a single SMU personnel this year. I think it went down hill when the prize table was no more starting in 2009 or 2010.

frostfire
03-19-2017, 18:19
FWIW, the link to the marksmanship master trainer course. Wealth of practical info
http://www.benning.army.mil/armor/316thCav/129/mmtc/CourseMaterial.html