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Brush Okie
09-19-2016, 15:01
Intresting. Finally getting the 303 Enfields replaced. They are going to be built by Colt, but the design and original license is Tikka. Wonder what ammo they will get? Will it be plain old 7.62 ball or something a little better to stop bears? Thoughts? BTW the article is from 2015 but just found out about the rifle. It does look like a nice rifle.

http://www.army-armee.forces.gc.ca/en/news-publications/national-news-details-no-menu.page?doc=canadian-rangers-approve-of-smaller-more-powerful-new-rifles/ievvvdk2

Yellowknife, Northwest Territories — The Canadian Rangers are bidding adieu to the hunting rifle that has served them well for nearly 70 years and reactions to its replacement are positive.

The new prototype rifle, the C-19, was designed by Finland’s Sako, based on its Tikka T3 CTR model. Manufacturing will be done by Colt Canada.

“"As a hunter with a gunsmith background myself, I was pretty impressed,"” says Warrant Officer Luke Foster, who was part of the process through which the Canadian Army selected the C-19, which will start initial deliveries in 2016.

“"I visited the factory,"” WO Foster adds. “"Their quality assurance is outstanding. I have no doubt Colt Canada will be able to match the standards that were set by this rifle."”

The Canadian Rangers are a sub-component of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) Reserve Force. The mission of the Rangers is to provide lightly equipped, self-sufficient, mobile forces in support of the CAF’s sovereignty and domestic operation tasks in Canada. They act as the ‘eyes and ears’ of the CAF in remote locations and share their expertise and guidance during operations and exercises with Primary Reserve and Regular Force soldiers.

There is also a Junior Canadian Rangers program, which offers youth aged 12 to 18 the opportunity to acquire a wide range of skills and learn under Canadian Rangers’ supervision. Their activities help to preserve the culture, traditions and customs of their communities and foster good citizenship, community responsibility, personal health and welfare and increased self-esteem. Although Junior Canadian Rangers are taught the basics of marksmanship, they do not carry weapons.

Canadian Rangers have been equipped with the Canadian-manufactured Lee Enfield .303 since 1947 and WO Foster explains that its replacement includes many of the same features; an indication of the old warhorse’s enduring qualities.

Nonetheless, its advanced age means replacement parts are increasingly difficult to find and may even be altogether unavailable by 2017. Because of that, damaged rifles have had to be replaced entirely rather than repaired in recent years and stocks are near depletion.

“" [The Lee Enfield] proved its worth but it’s time for that rifle to retire,"” says WO Foster. “"It was an absolute necessity."”

The .308 C-19 improves on the Lee Enfield in pure power, which is an important factor in the Rangers’ operational areas where the most present threat is from dangerous wild animals.

“"We really took that worst-case scenario into account in our testing,"” says WO Foster. “"We’ve tested the bullets with a surrogate target to make sure they’re going to have the stopping power. We wanted to make sure it’s more than enough to stop an angry polar bear. We’re confident the bullet will outperform the current .303."”

The C-19’s quick acquisition sight, which was built by Sako specifically to meet Canadian Armed Forces requirements, will also help in this regard, allowing them to identify such threats early and quickly from up to 600 metres away.

“"It has a circular front sight housing that perfectly matches the aperture in the rear,"” WO Foster explains. “"When you bring the rifle to your shoulder, your eyes just automatically align to those circles. So you can take that sight picture very quickly."”

The C-19 is also lighter, shorter and, says WO Foster, “"considerably more accurate."” Its “"robust"” barrel is thicker and more durable. Durability was, of course, a key consideration: The C-19 rifle was fired 8,000 times in testing without significant failures. “"And it continued to keep its high precision throughout those 8,000 rounds,"” he notes.

Parts that would be plastic on other hunting rifles are aluminum alloy on the C-19 because of cold temperature requirements. The rear sight, WO Foster says, is “"heavy-duty machined steel."”

Testing was NATO standard for military rifles and also included salt water immersion, and heat, extreme cold and humidity testing. “"This is normal testing you would do for any military rifle, but this is a hunting rifle. It’s a far more robust hunting rifle than you would ever buy on the civilian market, that’s for sure,"” WO Foster says.

The Canadian Armed Forces’ Small Arms Modernization Project has been underway for the past five years. Rangers were surveyed to determine what they would like to see from a new weapon. More trials are planned and further feedback will be sought from Canadian Rangers to determine if more can be done to improve upon the prototype.

“"Overall, the feedback has been extremely positive,"” WO Foster says. “"[Canadian Rangers] were very happy with the rifle. We’re very comfortable issuing this rifle to the Canadian Rangers knowing we’ve done our due diligence to make sure it’s going to perform when it’s needed the most."”

Fort Smith Ranger Sergeant Brenda Johnson, a member of the 1st Canadian Rangers Patrol Group for over 20 years, agrees that the C-19 is a welcome addition.

“"I actually really like it so far. I think it’s going to be a great rifle for us."”

In addition to reduced recoil, Sgt Johnson says she appreciates the C-19’s oversized bolt handle, which makes the rifle easier to operate while wearing warm gloves. Its stock, she adds, can be adjusted to suit the user’s arm length.

While Sgt Johnson says she’d like to see some minor changes to the quick acquisition sight, she adds she finds the C-19 “"a lot handier, more convenient."”

“"I think, overall, the general opinion is that it is a very nice rifle; a nice addition, that’s for sure."”

By Steven Fouchard, Army Public Affairs

JJ_BPK
09-19-2016, 17:08
We talked about this last yr.. Long overdue, but the Rangers are an offshoot of the RCMP and their AO is all the Canadian First Nations tribal land.

As for ammo,, I'm guessing they make due with want they get..

mojaveman
09-19-2016, 21:38
Interesting that they held on to the .303 Enfield for so long and also that they considered it adequate for the larger bears. I'd want something bigger myself.

Anybody know what the rangers in Alaska use?

JJ_BPK
09-20-2016, 06:02
Interesting that they held on to the .303 Enfield for so long and also that they considered it adequate for the larger bears. I'd want something bigger myself.

Jack O'Connor is said to have use a 270 on all his African hunts for all game, including elephant.

One well placed shot is all it takes.. The 303 is not a 270, but in the right hands, I'm sure it will do the job.


“Assuming a cartridge can make its way on merit alone, that cartridge is the .270 W.C.F. In its early years it sat in the corner, dressed in sackcloth and covered with ashes, while few riflemen suspected that underneath it had a figger like Miss America, a disposition like an angel, and it could bake pies like Mother used to make.”

— ”The .270 Can Do Big Things,” featured in The Lost Classics of Jack O’Connor, originally in Outdoor Life, 1943


Anybody know what the rangers in Alaska use?

Not sure we have a like force?? We did for a while during WW II..

Flagg
09-20-2016, 14:10
I remember a similar announcement a few years ago about the Canadian Rangers shifting from the Lee-Enfield to the Ruger Scout?

I wonder what happened for them to select again and go with the Tikka?

Brush Okie
09-20-2016, 15:07
I remember a similar announcement a few years ago about the Canadian Rangers shifting from the Lee-Enfield to the Ruger Scout?

I wonder what happened for them to select again and go with the Tikka?

Probably not enough kick back money to the procurement department.

Speaking of that, anyone ever fired the Ruger scout? Any idea how it works or accuracy? I probably would rather have the Tikka but never shot either rifle. I have an older Tikka M695 that I like a lot however.

JJ_BPK
09-20-2016, 15:27
Probably not enough kick back money to the procurement department.

Nothing to see here Proles,, move along..


New Canadian Ranger Rifle Contract Award ... and just in time for the Election Campaign

On 23 June 2015, Associate Defence Minister Julian Fantino announced a contract award for the New Canadian Ranger Rifle, posing with members of 1st Canadian Ranger Patrol Group. In Nunavut, 1 CRPG is already testing the 10 prototype NCRRs (which will later be tested by 4 CRPG in British Columbia). Those trial rifles were part of a 'separate quote' from the bulk of the NCRR contract for a total order for 10,200 New Canadian Ranger Rifle deliverable in 2016.

The NCRR contract award should please Julian Fantino (at left). Mr. Fantino had just returned from a trade junket to his native Italy and Sako's owners are Italian-based Beretta Holdings. [5] However, the rifles themselves are made in Finland. There have been reports that Beretta has threatened to relocate some Sako production to Italy in protest of restrictive export regulations in Finland.
http://www.casr.ca/bg-ncrr-new-canadian-ranger-rifle.htm


Not a bad looking rifle..

Flagg
09-20-2016, 15:58
Probably not enough kick back money to the procurement department.

Speaking of that, anyone ever fired the Ruger scout? Any idea how it works or accuracy? I probably would rather have the Tikka but never shot either rifle. I have an older Tikka M695 that I like a lot however.

Nah.

I like the look of it though.

Ruger used to be super popular down here in NZ(where you can't swing a dead cat without hitting a baker's dozen of hunting rifles).

But for the last 10 years Sako/Tikka have been becoming the "go to" hunting rifle brand.

Sako/Tikka now falling under the Beretta corporate umbrella.

I haven't seen a new Ruger down here in quite some time.

Tikka has the Battue which is similar to the Ruger Scout, nice rifle:

http://www.tikka.fi/rifles/tikka-t3/t3-battue-lite

-----

Funny thing about old Sakos/Tikkas

I imported a bunch of Finnish-Russian War era service rifles a few years back that use the old Mosin Nagant receivers. Both Sako and Tikka when they were seperate outfits.

While the bolts are not exactly smooth as glass like the modern ones, the accuracy standards sound like they were actually higher than the current 1MOA quality assurance as I have 1 that came with a Finnish hang tag target that shows 3 rounds within approx 1 inch shot from approximately 150m(some sort of non metirc Finnish measurement I think).

They shoot like lasers....about the same as my old Swedish Mauser and my old Swiss K31.

Brush Okie
09-20-2016, 16:17
Nah.

I like the look of it though.

Ruger used to be super popular down here in NZ(where you can't swing a dead cat without hitting a baker's dozen of hunting rifles).

But for the last 10 years Sako/Tikka have been becoming the "go to" hunting rifle brand.

Sako/Tikka now falling under the Beretta corporate umbrella.

I haven't seen a new Ruger down here in quite some time.

Tikka has the Battue which is similar to the Ruger Scout, nice rifle:

http://www.tikka.fi/rifles/tikka-t3/t3-battue-lite

-----

Funny thing about old Sakos/Tikkas

I imported a bunch of Finnish-Russian War era service rifles a few years back that use the old Mosin Nagant receivers. Both Sako and Tikka when they were seperate outfits.

While the bolts are not exactly smooth as glass like the modern ones, the accuracy standards sound like they were actually higher than the current 1MOA quality assurance as I have 1 that came with a Finnish hang tag target that shows 3 rounds within approx 1 inch shot from approximately 150m(some sort of non metirc Finnish measurement I think).

They shoot like lasers....about the same as my old Swedish Mauser and my old Swiss K31.

I would really like to get one of the old M39 mosins. Great shooters from everything I hear.

How is the accuracy on the Ruger scouts?

As for the C-19 I do like the laminate stocks. As JJ said good looking rifle, wish I had the money for one. It would be a good rifle for hunting here in western WA where the shots are usually close and fast. The Tikka Battu is scarce in the US. I might consider a Ruger but some of their rifles are not known for sub MOA like the Tikka.

Flagg
09-20-2016, 16:27
I would really like to get one of the old M39 mosins. Great shooters from everything I hear.

How is the accuracy on the Ruger scouts?

As for the C-19 I do like the laminate stocks. As JJ said good looking rifle, wish I had the money for one. It would be a good rifle for hunting here in western WA where the shots are usually close and fast. The Tikka Battu is scarce in the US. I might consider a Ruger but some of their rifles are not known for sub MOA like the Tikka.

I never fired the Ruger Scout, but have heard good things about it being a good carry rifle for 0-200m shots in the bush.

I'll try to scare up the website where I bought my antique receiver M39's from. They were pretty cheap......not sure if he's still operating though as he had a limited inventory.

Maple Flag
01-25-2017, 18:04
Looks like the civilian version is on the market.


http://www.tikka.fi/rifles/tikka-t3x/t3x-arctic

http://www.cabelas.ca/product/87880/tikka-t3x-arctic-stainless-bolt-action-rifle

JJ_BPK
01-25-2017, 18:29
They are very proud of their product,,
@ 2800 USD,, a bit steep for me,,
and no threaded barrel??

:munchin

Maple Flag
01-25-2017, 18:44
That's $2,800 CDN, or about $2,150 USD.

Also, according to Cabelas,

"Free-floating, hammer-forged threaded barrel"

According to Tikka,

"Mid contour barrel (cold hammer forged) with 5/8x24 muzzle thread"

http://cdn1.tikka.fi/sites/default/files/ARCTIC_technical_specifications.pdf


Not that I have a stake in this. It's not on my shopping list either. (Liking Sako though...)

Guymullins
01-25-2017, 22:43
My Tikka 30-06 is a splendid, no frills and very accurate rifle. I like the detachable magazine too. They have a very good reputation in Africa and it is a pity they don't make heavier calibers.
SAKO on the other hand do go up to a .375 H&H and although they are fine rifles they are a bit pricey and the wood stocks have a reputation of cracking in the .375 H&H.

mark46th
01-26-2017, 00:41
I have an Enfield in .308 from the Ishapore armory.. Pretty good shooter...

Brush Okie
01-26-2017, 01:35
My Tikka 30-06 is a splendid, no frills and very accurate rifle. I like the detachable magazine too. They have a very good reputation in Africa and it is a pity they don't make heavier calibers.
SAKO on the other hand do go up to a .375 H&H and although they are fine rifles they are a bit pricey and the wood stocks have a reputation of cracking in the .375 H&H.

A bit off topic but how do the Winchester 375 H&H hold up? As a kid I grew up hunting and would read about the hunters in Africa. While it will probably never happen in real life I still like to hear about what does and does not work aka gear whore. What is you favorite heavy caliber action and why?

Sorry to be off topic but I could not resist.

Guymullins
01-26-2017, 02:03
A bit off topic but how do the Winchester 375 H&H hold up? As a kid I grew up hunting and would read about the hunters in Africa. While it will probably never happen in real life I still like to hear about what does and does not work aka gear whore. What is you favorite heavy caliber action and why?

Sorry to be off topic but I could not resist.

A bit off topic but how do the Winchester 375 H&H hold up? As a kid I grew up hunting and would read about the hunters in Africa. While it will probably never happen in real life I still like to hear about what does and does not work aka gear whore. What is you favorite heavy caliber action and why?

Sorry to be off topic but I could not resist.

As I cant resist answering.
The Winchester is very well regarded in its Pre-64 guise.
They really ruined the name for a while with the cheaper-to-manufacture Model 70.

Dangerous game hunters here prize the Mauser type controlled round feed and Winchester's dropping it was scandalous according to the old guard.
That the new design closely mirrored the Remington 700, which is highly regarded, was a puzzlement.
The post 92 Winchester Classic is again well regarded and is a fine rifle.

My own belief is that the Remington, push feed action provides better accuracy as the bolt doesn't have a big hole down its side and I have never had a feed or extraction problem with my Remington 700.
The better accuracy is important to me as I now use the .375 for all my hunting, giving the Tikka to whichever son accompanies me on a hunt.

In short, Winchester has blotted its copybook twice as far as Africans are concerned.

First with the manufacture of the Winchester .458 Mag which initially gave big pressure problems in the high ambient temperatures of Africa. They then downloaded the round causing underperformance and lack of penetration. This has now been cured with new powders and better bullets, but is still a talking point around campfires.
The second blot was the cheapening of the post-64 Model 70. It was not just the loss of the Mauser type bolt, but the new bolt was made of two pieces brazed together, the checkering on the stock was pressed instead of carved and the barrels were no longer hand cut.
The receiver was forged instead of machined from a single block and only tempered where wear would take place. I can't remember any other differences apart from aluminum instead of steel around the trigger group.

My favorite heavy is the Rigby .416. The Mauser bolt is great and you don't need the extreme accuracy needed in an all-round rifle. The bullet is a real dinosaur stopper. It ticks all the boxes for me.

Badger52
01-26-2017, 10:55
Neat topic; good looking setup for the Canadian Rangers.

Have only owned 1 Sako-like substance (a 30-06). It's moniker was 'Beretta' but, frankly, that was just the wood (which was lovely). It was all Sako & liked heavy-for-caliber bullets. The wood, along with the heavier-than-sporter barrel profile made it weigh more than it really needed, but it balanced very well & swung while off-hand like an extension of your mind. The overall package made sense when considering that it was really intended to be one's "light" rifle to its companion .375 H&H. On a list of rifles I wish I had back, but wasn't looking forward to lugging it at 11,000' for elk.

Guymullins
01-26-2017, 13:53
Neat topic; good looking setup for the Canadian Rangers.

Have only owned 1 Sako-like substance (a 30-06). It's moniker was 'Beretta' but, frankly, that was just the wood (which was lovely). It was all Sako & liked heavy-for-caliber bullets. The wood, along with the heavier-than-sporter barrel profile made it weigh more than it really needed, but it balanced very well & swung while off-hand like an extension of your mind. The overall package made sense when considering that it was really intended to be one's "light" rifle to its companion .375 H&H. On a list of rifles I wish I had back, but wasn't looking forward to lugging it at 11,000' for elk.

My TIKKA's barrel says it was made by Bofors of 40mm AA gun fame. This is surprising as Bofors is Swedish, not Finnish.

Badger52
01-26-2017, 14:40
My TIKKA's barrel says it was made by Bofors of 40mm AA gun fame. This is surprising as Bofors is Swedish, not Finnish.Things that make one say, "hunh" - I would say that's some OK provenance Guy.
:cool:

frostfire
03-25-2017, 00:25
It does look like a nice rifle.

and it handles like Olympic grade Anschutz!

Gabriel Plano of Beretta was kind enough to let me test drive it today.
Won a Copenhagen by hammering the heart out of the silhouette at 200m off hand/standing:lifter If only I got to use it at All Army.... :boohoo
Having been used to brake and suppressor, all I can say is those Canadian rangers are tough mofos for using it in the basic configuration...with irons!

but what I'm most excited about is the Tikka T3x Tac A1. 1.6 inches 5 shots and 1.9 inches 10 shots groups at 400 yards with FGMM 175 gr! Supposedly the little brother (read: affordable) version of the Sako TRG M10, the solid platform that IMHOO should have won over the XM2010.
Looks like this will be my entry to PRS at last. Master Rick was right in steering me towards Tikka. It's a solid factory sub 0.5 MOA precision rifle.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGSKWjzntDU

Brush Okie
03-25-2017, 02:03
and it handles like Olympic grade Anschutz!

Gabriel Plano of Beretta was kind enough to let me test drive it today.
Won a Copenhagen by hammering the heart out of the silhouette at 200m off hand/standing:lifter If only I got to use it at All Army.... :boohoo
Having been used to brake and suppressor, all I can say is those Canadian rangers are tough mofos for using it in the basic configuration...with irons!

but what I'm most excited about is the Tikka T3x Tac A1. 1.6 inches 5 shots and 1.9 inches 10 shots groups at 400 yards with FGMM 175 gr! Supposedly the little brother (read: affordable) version of the Sako TRG M10, the solid platform that IMHOO should have won over the XM2010.
Looks like this will be my entry to PRS at last. Master Rick was right in steering me towards Tikka. It's a solid factory sub 0.5 MOA precision rifle.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGSKWjzntDU

Glad to hear it is as nice as they say. Thanks for the update.

MR2
03-26-2017, 12:49
It's a better shot than I.

Badger52
03-26-2017, 17:23
Love the JH tab.
:cool:

PSM
03-26-2017, 22:43
Love the JH tab.
:cool:

LOL! I missed that. I want one. I'm AZBRDR Civilian Vet.

Pat

CSB
03-28-2017, 18:18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mojaveman View Post
Interesting that they held on to the .303 Enfield for so long and also that they considered it adequate for the larger bears. I'd want something bigger myself.

Jack O'Connor is said to have use a 270 on all his African hunts for all game, including elephant.

One well placed shot is all it takes.. The 303 is not a 270, but in the right hands, I'm sure it will do the job.


Quote:
“Assuming a cartridge can make its way on merit alone, that cartridge is the .270 W.C.F. In its early years it sat in the corner, dressed in sackcloth and covered with ashes, while few riflemen suspected that underneath it had a figger like Miss America, a disposition like an angel, and it could bake pies like Mother used to make.”

— ”The .270 Can Do Big Things,” featured in The Lost Classics of Jack O’Connor, originally in Outdoor Life, 1943


1 - I understand that a small caliber cartridge, in the hands of a marksman who can place well aimed shots into vital areas, may be all that is needed for hunting even big game, BUT ...
if I get to the point where out of the brush comes a momma bear angry that I'm between her and one of her cubs, I want a cartridge with a BIG bullet, moving fast, that I don't need to place exactly to make a stop.

2 - An old (alleged) jocular response from a big game hunter in Africa when asked:

Q. "Why do you carry a .460 Weatherby?"

A. "Because they don't make a .560 Weatherby."

Badger52
03-29-2017, 07:36
1 - I understand that a small caliber cartridge, in the hands of a marksman who can place well aimed shots into vital areas, may be all that is needed for hunting even big game, BUT ...
if I get to the point where out of the brush comes a momma bear angry that I'm between her and one of her cubs, I want a cartridge with a BIG bullet, moving fast, that I don't need to place exactly to make a stop.

2 - An old (alleged) jocular response from a big game hunter in Africa when asked:

Q. "Why do you carry a .460 Weatherby?"

A. "Because they don't make a .560 Weatherby."Indeed. Big animal, big teeth, throw biggest bullet you can handle.

A segue from the Canadians' new rifle since you bring up the .270. I have several O'Connor works on the book shelf. While he took the heat because - at the time - his trumpeting the .270 was heretical to the 30-06 crowd, the fact is that he used a 30-06 as much if not more than the .270. He gave the .270 the edge hand-loaded with the right bullet on things like sheep or particularly pronghorn, but even then seldom needed that because his hunting skills in the mountains often let him stalk close enough that he could've used a 30-30. Few modern cartridges have been so bally-hooed yet underperforming in their advertised ballistics as factory .270 ammo, and I have verified this myself with many samples over a chrono.

The Reaper
03-29-2017, 11:10
The 7x57 Mauser has probably killed every type of game animal in Africa, but I would not be taking it as a first choice.

Having said that, I would expect that it (or the .270) would make a fine light game rifle when paired with a .375 H&H or bigger for the dangerous stuff.

Many professional hunters have used a .600 Nitro Express as a back-up gun.

No kill like an overkill.

TR

craigepo
03-30-2017, 10:11
I just had my 7mm mag tricked-out, and had them put a recoil suppressor on the barrel. 7mm mags kick like a mule without one---I can't imagine zeroing one of those mammoth calibers.

DJ Urbanovsky
03-30-2017, 14:41
I wonder why they would select that rifle over the Remington 700 platform which is more ubiquitous, with a wider array of aftermarket components, and is less expensive?

Brush Okie
03-30-2017, 15:18
I wonder why they would select that rifle over the Remington 700 platform which is more ubiquitous, with a wider array of aftermarket components, and is less expensive?

Tikka is a better rifle all around. Only reason Remington began standard is because they are cheap and easy to work on they are not the best thing going by far.

DaveP
04-05-2017, 13:52
Although I can't speak to sniping rigs, I too find Tikka's to be superior rifles. Had a T3 varmint in 7-08 for several seasons, one of the nicest stock action and triggers I've shot, and easy to carry and mount (short-barrel version). Went back to my BLR since a) I actually prefer a lever and shoot this as well as the Tikka, and b) given our usual terrain and cover, prone is reserved for tree-trunk moss inspection when trying to find north, so some of the bolt advantage is less applicable here.

MR2, a few questions about your TAC if you don't mind?

Did you choose 6.5, and if so, any thoughts vs .308 out to, say 500m? Like the recoil, drop?
XLR chassis? aftermarket trigger?
Did you need extra cheek height beyond the stock adjustment d/t the can?
What's your Walmart overwatch station during JH2017, so some of us can be elsewhere, maybe?

TIA. And sorry to perpetuate the drift...
DaveP

edit: Ahh! Thanks for the correction, had not seen the TSR. The T3 compact Tactical seems like an excellent frame to modify. Enjoy!

MR2
04-05-2017, 17:15
MR2, a few questions about your TAC if you don't mind?

I went w .308 - I've had insufficient time to do anything beyond zero and run it out some. It does not like M118 but does like Match PPU 175gr FMJ. I'm shooting sub 1" and younger eyes are at at .6" at 100M. 8" plates at 1000M.
Tikka TSR-1 (https://tikkaperformance.com/index.php?_route_=tikka-rifle/tikka-precision-rifle)
No adjustments needed for the can.


I occasionally work the Alien Processing Facility beneath DIA. It is out of this world! ;)

Badger52
04-05-2017, 17:18
I occasionally work the Alien Processing Facility beneath DIA. It is out of this world! ;)You funnnny. Ha.
:cool:

Brush Okie
04-06-2017, 01:03
I


I occasionally work the Alien Processing Facility beneath DIA. It is out of this world! ;)

Could you hook me up with some discount Soilant Green?