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Golf1echo
06-25-2016, 10:57
Granted this is from another SOF branch but an interesting drill that sometimes gets misrepresented. So here are the drills from the source:
http://www.gizmodo.com.au/2016/06/how-the-navy-seals-prepare-for-extreme-cold-weather-survival-and-how-you-can-too/

John has a solid reputation in that community and was kind enough to give us time when we reached out to him. His advice guided us to the pieces we have had the most success with.

Here is one of the reasons we think this concept works. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lI0RUR6ezwg *

* The video is posted here as a demonstration of the concept, if it violates rules please remove.

Pete
06-25-2016, 11:27
Just about any technique will work if you can trap heat and get your internal motor working.

Notice the type of clothing is stressed in this technique.

The SEALs were in an extreme example and they knew it - and were under supervision. 12 minutes is a long time to be in freezing water. Body temps took a real hit.

The bigger danger is to the casual outdoor person on a cool wet day who gets soaked and doesn't realize their body temp is dropping fast.

Since we were moving to get some place if somebody got soaked the drill was to quickly change and keep moving - you'll get warm pretty quick - and get there.

Team Sergeant
06-25-2016, 13:35
Brought back memories of breaking the ice on Drowning Creek and swimming across. (I should put in for PTSD pay.........:munchin)

Joker
06-25-2016, 15:13
Brought back memories of breaking the ice on Drowning Creek and swimming across. (I should put in for PTSD pay.........:munchin)

BTDT at Drowning Creek. If you do put in for it I'll take your guns fishing in my John boat about 30 miles in the Gulf for you... ;)

Team Sergeant
06-25-2016, 15:50
BTDT at Drowning Creek. If you do put in for it I'll take your guns fishing in my John boat about 30 miles in the Gulf for you... ;)

You jest! I was getting "cold-backs" just watching that video!

nousdefions
06-25-2016, 16:33
Geez, thanks. Breaking ice in the January Drowning Creek slide for life. Now me and Gash Cuntzman have "temporary PTSD". Sure am glad we broke the ice before the poncho raft drill.

CSB
06-25-2016, 20:34
Drowning Creek ...

... now that is a name I have not heard in over 30 years.

And yet the memories flood back.

Still water runs deep.

But that is true of all of Camp Mackall.

It is still, but the memories run deep.

Golf1echo
06-27-2016, 09:47
Just about any technique will work if you can trap heat and get your internal motor working.

Notice the type of clothing is stressed in this technique.

The SEALs were in an extreme example and they knew it - and were under supervision. 12 minutes is a long time to be in freezing water. Body temps took a real hit.

The bigger danger is to the casual outdoor person on a cool wet day who gets soaked and doesn't realize their body temp is dropping fast.

Since we were moving to get some place if somebody got soaked the drill was to quickly change and keep moving - you'll get warm pretty quick - and get there.

I recall a story a few years back of an 80+ year old man in Vermont that had wandered away on a frigid night were temperatures fell down into the teens. Local rescuers expected a recovery when they found him alive, he had walked the entire time... keeping moving had kept him warm enough to survive.

The article brings full circle the lessons of train to prepare and know your capabilities, it seems when one cuts corners, gets a little ahead of themselves, or that bad day comes along there are still plenty of lessons to learn and having the pieces you can count on even when wet or compromised is invaluable.

By imagining the forces at play, ie. the 5 methods of heat loss and to some degree the reverse for warm weather, the materials involved and the forces at work you can begin to understand what is needed to protect yourself. With new materials and the right combination of materials one can create some very effective protection for a wide spectrum of conditions. I see the image below as an example, while to some it may appear to be meager protection and already compromised, to me I know it's going to be warm and dry with any moisture issues soon eliminating themselves from the system. Even with frost and ice forming on the exterior by morning a quick shake and those water crystals dissipate into the wind...a far cry from moisture laden down. The same is true in understanding the individual materials...will that nylon function in -72f conditions? Knowing they can is important, Knowing you can is critical!

CSB I certainly agree with you about Camp Mackall.