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Golf1echo
04-22-2015, 12:47
Bucking the trend of " Your gona need a bigger boat". Looking into fishing by Belly Boat. It appears to be a favored mode of fishing in some of the local lakes where no power craft is allowed. So far I have found mixed to very lame information, it looks like you can use different fishing methods. Then there are the hybrid crafts, pontoon rafts, oar boats, etc... ?
The waders seem to be an important part of the system especially for colder waters. Looking for any experienced based info. before taking a local fly fishing class.

JJ_BPK
04-22-2015, 13:18
Bucking the trend of " Your gona need a bigger boat". Looking into fishing by Belly Boat. It appears to be a favored mode of fishing in some of the local lakes where no power craft is allowed. So far I have found mixed to very lame information, it looks like you can use rod or reel. Then there are the hybrid crafts, pontoon rafts, oar boats, etc... ?
The waders seem to be an important part of the system especially for colder waters. Looking for any experienced based info. before taking a local fly fishing class.

I have not use one, but have friends that fish up north that do. From discussions two problems stick out.

1)hypothermia,, Even with waders you are keeping a lot of your body in cold water, so you also need insulation, maybe even electric socks??

2)mobility,, you need special fins that allow thrust and legs that are going to take the work load.

I have one friend that lives in Germany and does a lot of fly fishing. He brought a tube over one year and fished for small Tarpon. It worked, but he had a boat chase him as the currents can be 3-7 knots back in the flats.

In the Keys, kayaks are very popular. Mobility is good. You can rig them with coolers and rod holders. They have developed stand up models..

One intrepid friend even use his cooler as a platform, but he is scrawny and young..

Good luck..

craigepo
04-22-2015, 14:04
Ditto on the canoe and kayak idea. They work for what youre talking about, plus a lot more. Short one-man size will fit in the back of a pickup.

Wading works pretty well in fast-moving water. However, in impoundments, the sounds travels pretty fast, and the fish spook easy when you're walking in their home.

I spend a lot of time fishing in my canoe. Wouldn't trade it for anything.

Golf1echo
04-23-2015, 05:56
I appreciate the inputs. Perhaps I'll get a chance to try one but the idea of dangling your legs into the water and, as said, the approach seem counter productive in colder waters. A 7 lb- 9lb weight sounds good but with waders, and fins a packraft might be a better alternative for high country and remote lakes.

I have to agree about the kayaks, I instantly was hooked upon using one. The thing is I got started on Greenland style touring kayaks, they can carry weight, move fast and get through some rough waves * but they aren't the stable platform of a kayak designed for fishing or diving. They have continued to get more sophisticated I see.
http://www.wildernesssystems.com/kayaks/atak/atak-140

Reading the posts I realized as much as I have enjoyed canoes, I have never owned one...perhaps this canoe might be the answer? http://www.oldtowncanoe.com/canoes/recreation/discovery_119/ at 49lbs it still fits into a pack canoe class making any portages simpler. The 32" width suggests it would have better speed even though the length is 11'-9". I like the idea of sitting up a little higher to fish too.
* Below are the Greenland style Kayaks mentioned: Wilderness System, Sealutions...good for movement but much less area to work out of.
Thank you.

craigepo
04-23-2015, 11:00
old town makes a good canoe. A bunch of the smaller canoe companies have went out of business, as the canoe material (royal-x), became really hard to get.

You probably know this already, but in faster water, avoid a keel. Slower water a keel is great to help the wind from blowing you all over the place.

Another good thing about a canoe is you can be a real sturdy seatback, which helps the back immensely during a long day.

That 49-lb canoe would be pretty easy to load and unload yourself.

Brush Okie
04-23-2015, 11:57
I used to have a sit on top kayak I fished out of. My buddy even went shark fishing in his.

Golf1echo
04-24-2015, 19:36
old town makes a good canoe. A bunch of the smaller canoe companies have went out of business, as the canoe material (royal-x), became really hard to get.

You probably know this already, but in faster water, avoid a keel. Slower water a keel is great to help the wind from blowing you all over the place.

Another good thing about a canoe is you can be a real sturdy seatback, which helps the back immensely during a long day.

That 49-lb canoe would be pretty easy to load and unload yourself.
Interesting tracking this down, found a used Royalex canoe to try tomorrow... 33lbs. I have little experience with canoes, I see your points. In a kayak a skeg is something that came in handy along the coast once for the reasons you mentioned, American kayaks tend more toward rudders from what I have seen.
For those out in the South East, I have always enjoyed this event: https://www.ccprc.com/1542/East-Coast-Paddlesports-Outdoor-Festival

I used to have a sit on top kayak I fished out of. My buddy even went shark fishing in his. The waters below take things to a different level, do you get out on the coast there?

Golf1echo
04-27-2015, 17:20
Took the chance to trial the canoe despite the weather. For an area I always just drove by never giving it a thought, the old stomping grounds of the Ute and Arapaho is almost other worldly...

I thought it was a nice little platform, it has a good balance between a small keel and flatter bottom yet when you brace it can almost spin.No fish but that is definitely on me..Scratch that with a 16" Rainbow Trout :). appreciate the suggestion, thank you.

Images of two of the lakes, and fish with watershed in back ground.