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Sully2490
03-31-2015, 16:34
I just finished "Get Selected", it was a great read. In the 30 day plaN it says avoid training legs with weights because you train your legs with cardio. Should I steer clear of training legs entirely or throw it in every once in awhile? Thanks.

head
03-31-2015, 21:20
Try both.

JJ_BPK
04-01-2015, 06:45
I just finished "Get Selected", it was a great read. In the 30 day plaN it says avoid training legs with weights because you train your legs with cardio. Should I steer clear of training legs entirely or throw it in every once in awhile? Thanks.

Running and Rucking,,

Nuff said??

blue02hd
04-01-2015, 08:06
What sports do you play in high school?

Wes Kennedy
09-22-2015, 17:18
I would steer clear of that advice IMO. Strength training (true strength training, not circuit training), will allow you to express your energy systems across a variety of modalities effectively. Strength training (especially your legs) will produce growth hormone and testosterone, increase lean muscle mass, strengthen tendons and ligaments, and increase bone density.

Here's an article I recently wrote on this topic: http://loadoutroom.com/17032/sof-training-tips-conquer-imbalance-with-single-leg-training/

When I prescribe single leg strength movements I start with the basics and only increase the complexity (less balance, front rack carries, etc.) as the athlete is able to adapt:

I may start with unweighted standing lunges, before moving to DB standing lunges, then onto reverse DB lunges, to reverse DB lunges on 2" lift, to unweighted RFESS/Russian Step-Ups, to DB RFESS/Russian Step-Ups to DB walking lunges (notice that locomotion comes in much later). If you see the guys at the gym not touching their back knee to the ground and swinging the DB's to move forward when doing DB walking lunges, that's a perfect example of someone that needs to regress. If the unweighted standing lunges don't look good, I'll regress them even further to some glute activation work and core stability.

At the end of the day, anyone that is telling you not to train your legs because you train them during running and rucking does not have a fundamental understanding of how the human body works. Single leg training, combined with vertical pressing, and static core work are 3 of the most common areas that I see lagging in tactical athletes. I will add one caveat, in that if an individual is nearing selection phase I would place a higher emphasis on running and rucking than on true strength work. The majority of the strength work would be found in tough, grinder, type activities. This is true for any sport, the closer you get to the event, the more sport specific the training should be.

head
09-22-2015, 19:01
I will add one caveat, in that if an individual is nearing selection phase I would place a higher emphasis on running and rucking than on true strength work. ... This is true for any sport, the closer you get to the event, the more sport specific the training should be.

Hmm. You don't say.

craigepo
09-22-2015, 20:16
At the end of the day, anyone that is telling you not to train your legs because you train them during running and rucking does not have a fundamental understanding of how the human body works.

No Shit? I always knew those guys who smoked SFAS were a bunch of dumb bastards.

Alright, all you guys that are getting ready for SFAS, put your rucksack in storage. Get back in the gym and just do some lunges and squats. Throw a little core in as well. The graders at SFAS are looking for increased muscle mass and more testosterone. Damn, almost forgot that increased bone density is right up top of the grading scale as well.

Fucking clown shoes.

SF_BHT
09-22-2015, 20:53
I would steer clear of that advice IMO. Strength training (true strength training, not circuit training), will allow you to express your energy systems across a variety of modalities effectively. Strength training (especially your legs) will produce growth hormone and testosterone, increase lean muscle mass, strengthen tendons and ligaments, and increase bone density.

Here's an article I recently wrote on this topic: http://loadoutroom.com/17032/sof-training-tips-conquer-imbalance-with-single-leg-training/

When I prescribe single leg strength movements I start with the basics and only increase the complexity (less balance, front rack carries, etc.) as the athlete is able to adapt:

I may start with unweighted standing lunges, before moving to DB standing lunges, then onto reverse DB lunges, to reverse DB lunges on 2" lift, to unweighted RFESS/Russian Step-Ups, to DB RFESS/Russian Step-Ups to DB walking lunges (notice that locomotion comes in much later). If you see the guys at the gym not touching their back knee to the ground and swinging the DB's to move forward when doing DB walking lunges, that's a perfect example of someone that needs to regress. If the unweighted standing lunges don't look good, I'll regress them even further to some glute activation work and core stability.

At the end of the day, anyone that is telling you not to train your legs because you train them during running and rucking does not have a fundamental understanding of how the human body works. Single leg training, combined with vertical pressing, and static core work are 3 of the most common areas that I see lagging in tactical athletes. I will add one caveat, in that if an individual is nearing selection phase I would place a higher emphasis on running and rucking than on true strength work. The majority of the strength work would be found in tough, grinder, type activities. This is true for any sport, the closer you get to the event, the more sport specific the training should be.

Wes's welcome to the board. First this is not SOFREP....
Second read the stickies... Special Forces questions section is for people to ask questions of USASF. Only USASF are to answer/comment in this thread. Please read up and follow our rules....:D

Scimitar
09-22-2015, 21:19
Sorry BHT, I missed what forum this was. Out of my lane. Ignore.

S

kalanis
09-23-2015, 09:18
Alright, all you guys that are getting ready for SFAS, put your rucksack in storage. Get back in the gym and just do some lunges and squats....

Fucking clown shoes.

When I went I was already a heavy squat guy, so I cut a ton of lifting and ran more. I hit the versa-climber at the gym every day. First time, I could only do 3 minutes. By the time I went to the Q, an hour.

My advice to kids who ask me is always to build upper body strength. I saw tons of guys who could not lift their weight and had trouble doing two consecutive rope climbs let alone the multiple ones you do on the Nick.

Go strong and go fast.

Team Sergeant
09-23-2015, 09:39
When I went I was already a heavy squat guy, so I cut a ton of lifting and ran more. I hit the versa-climber at the gym every day. First time, I could only do 3 minutes. By the time I went to the Q, an hour.

My advice to kids who ask me is always to build upper body strength. I saw tons of guys who could not lift their weight and had trouble doing two consecutive rope climbs let alone the multiple ones you do on the Nick.

Go strong and go fast.

No one posts in this thread except the folks asking the questions and the SF'ers answering them.

If you're SF we need to vet you otherwise you're just another somebody that is answering for us. ;)

Team Sergeant
09-23-2015, 09:40
If you're not "Vetted SF" and are not "asking" a question, do not post in these threads.