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Brush Okie
12-01-2014, 08:43
Ran across this. Looks interesting. I have always thought about trying something like this.

Are you headed for the beach or going camping in the mountains? Maybe you live on a boat, visit a remote cabin or you're living off-grid. Electricity is yours for the taking as long as the wind is blowing... And you can get it on the CHEAP with an easy homemade wind generator. Light up that storeroom, barn or use the generator to keep all your vehicle batteries charged too.

My off-grid cabin's electricity comes from solar and wind power, stored in 6-Volt golf cart batteries. A charge controller and battery minder keeps my system from under-and over charging. The whole shebang cost me less than $1000 and I have lights, fans, TV and stereo, refrigeration, and a disco ball that goes up for special occasions.

If you can turn a wrench and operate an electric drill, you can build this simple generator in two days: one day of chasing down parts and one day assembling the components. The FOUR basic components include a GM pickup truck alternator ($40 new), a GM fan-clutch assembly ($35 used), the bracket for mounting the generator on a tower or pole ($25 galvanized pipe and fittings version), and a tower or pole ($20 for 15 feet of 2" tubing, used). If you're a Ford guy or a MOPAR gal that's fine, just make sure the alternator has a built-in voltage regulator. You'll also need some electric cable or wires to hook it up to your storage battery. I used 8 gauge, three-strand copper wire pilfered from the oil patch. (And they said the transition from fossil fuels to renewables would take years. Pfft!)
My Wind Generator Parts List

Car/Truck Alternator - GM 1988, 350 motor, alternator with built-in regulator (used in illustration). Almost any alternator with a regulator will work but use a new one. It should have a warranty. .................................................. ..............................................cont

http://www.motherearthnews.com/renewable-energy/homemade-wind-generator-zbcz1407.aspx#axzz36yyyMynI

The Reaper
12-01-2014, 10:57
Very cool, thanks for sharing.

TR

MtnGoat
12-01-2014, 12:50
Nice find.. this is something you can make downrange. Need a power source for those range lights, power a small room, etc. Thanks

This should be added to the 18 Charlie Special Operations Construction (SOC) Handbook.

I always felt that we as SF should have deployable windmills for power.

PSM
12-01-2014, 12:53
I'd like to see a video showing it working. I don't see it working. An automobile engine spins up the generator to an RPM that the wind never will. How much energy is produced at low RPM? How much wind would be needed to just to get it to start turning? One reason that wind gennies have such long blades is to help provide momentum once they are turning. Maybe if you attached it to water-pumping windmill blades, but the bearings wouldn't take the load for long.

If you are planning to depend on it, you need purpose built equipment.

Just my off-grid opinion. ;)

Pat

cedsall
12-01-2014, 14:35
He had me at "disco ball".

<SARCASM> If it's TEOTWAWKI, I definitely need a disco ball in my off the grid cabin to remind me of all those great times during the disco years...</SARCASM>

VVVV
12-01-2014, 16:13
A new GM alternator for $40??? thermal fan clutch??? I can't see the wind being able to turn the alternator under load. A thermal fan clutch would not engage the fan blade. Total bull!!

Hill
12-02-2014, 09:04
If anyone is planning on entertaining this idea, please consider not only adding a brake and gearbox, but also using different rotor blades as well as building the tower much higher.

Team Sergeant
12-02-2014, 12:38
And I ain't no mechanical engineer but I'm guessing the blades on that GM fan-clutch assembly are designed to propel wind "onto" the radiator, and not catch the incoming wind and redirect it into a collection point. :munchin

PSM
12-02-2014, 23:18
I'm guessing the blades on that GM fan-clutch assembly are designed to propel wind "onto" the radiator

Negative. It's designed to pull air through the radiator at low or no speeds like sitting at a stop light. The clutch slips or disengages at higher road speeds/cooler temps.

Pat

atticus finch
12-03-2014, 06:23
that setup 'might' work IF there is enough wind speed to push that fan, I'm no mechanical engineer but I really doubt that fan has enough area to move that alternator under most conditions. Especially if it's a 60 amp alternator and it looks like it is.
Secondly, he makes no mention of two important things. He says that is rigged to swivel 360 degrees to catch the wind from it's prevailing direction.
First off what has he done to control power to the field windings if/when the alternator is not turning, ie: not generating current?
In a car, power to the alternator field windings is controlled on/off via the keyed-hot side of the ignition key switch.
For those not familiar with this, it means when you turn the ignition key to the 'on' position, it connects battery power to the rest of the cars electrical system, including the alternator field windings.
IF the alternator is not turning, it is not generating current however the field is still drawing current at max level because the voltage regulator senses no current output from the alternator. This will continue on until the battery runs out or the key switch is turned off, or ultimately the field windings burn out.
In his setup, if the wind isn't turning the alternator, how then does he switch off the field to prevent it from drawing down the battery?
Secondly, if that setup can swivel 360 degrees, how is he maintaining power to the field? on your car it's a green wire connected to the field terminal on the alternator. He makes no mention of a slip-ring or anything to connect power to the field windings when it swivels or pivots. The same question for the output lead and the ground lead apply also.
Wind-operated alternators sounds good and can be done but are relatively hard to do. A water-wheel setup is much easier and more effective.
I find his claims somewhat dubious given those important details are missing.

Joker
12-03-2014, 15:06
Nope. It would take 4,000-6,000 RPMs at the shaft to produce the electricity needed to charge the batteries. The crankshaft pulley is around 8" and needs to be turning around 1,800-2,000 RPMs in a car to charge its battery.
I normally threw those fans away and replaced them with flex racing fans on my hotrods. They rob too much HP.

mark46th
12-04-2014, 15:18
This picture doesn't show any wiring. Had to look at the article...

Requiem
12-04-2014, 17:01
We're looking at wind generators for our waaaaay-off-the-grid beachfront property in Kodiak. Lots of wind there nearly all the time. Would like to find a reasonable red-neck version to build. :D

A little research on using a vehicle alternator yielded this from HomePower:

A car alternator is a bad choice for a wind generator. The efficiency in normal use is never more than about 60 percent. The bearings are too small to reliably support large blades (more than about 1.5 meters diameter). It is designed to be lightweight and robust, and to withstand running at very high rpm. At low rpm it produces nothing, and low rpm is where wind generators spend the majority of their time running.

If you use a car alternator in a wind turbine, the speed problem can be addressed in one of several unsatisfactory ways:


Use a small blade area so that the short blades can spin at high rpm. This means that you cannot catch much wind, and even so, you will need a high wind speed to get the necessary rpm. It will also take a lot of wind to produce high enough power to excite the magnetic field and actually have energy to spare.

Use gearing to increase the rpm. This involves extra cost, extra losses, extra unreliability, and overall ugly and clumsy engineering.

Rewind the coils to work at lower speed. This means more turns of thinner wire in each coil. This reduces the cut-in rpm, but also increases the losses in the coils themselves, limiting the power output and further reducing the already low efficiency.


A car alternator’s rotor needs to be powered to excite the magnetic field. The field has to be at a maximum to get output at the lowest speed. This represents a constant power loss of 30 to 40 watts during operation. You will also have to remove and bypass the internal regulator. The internal regulator in the alternator is not suitable for charging a deep-cycle battery via a long wire run.

While it is cheap and attractive at first look, the car alternator is more trouble than it is worth. It is better to build a purpose-built alternator for a wind turbine. Here. (http://www.homepower.com/articles/wind-power/design-installation/ask-experts-car-alternator-wind-turbine)

S.

atticus finch
01-01-2015, 08:55
Only problem with water wheels is you'd better get permission from Uncle Sam first or you could get into some trouble.

I wouldn't be surprised at that in the least, although I have no idea what supposed 'law' it'd violate.
I had a rube goldberg setup going across a 6 foot creek when I lived in the desert, I had a deputy sheriff show up one time when I was tinkering on it & his only comment was "that's pretty damned clever" Given how he acted, he already likely knew it didn't have anything to do with meth, he probably just wanted to see who built it. Were that a fed employee? I have no doubt they'd view that as a career-building opportunity.

PSM
01-01-2015, 13:35
I wouldn't be surprised at that in the least, although I have no idea what supposed 'law' it'd violate.

CALIFORNIA LAWS RESTRICT GROUNDWATER USE ON PRIVATE LAND

“With the stroke of his pen, the Governor changed over 100 years of water laws – without the people’s input. This is not the democracy Californians deserve.” – State Senator Jim Nielsen

In the midst of drought and heightened overdrafting problems, California passed legislation allowing the state to control and regulate the use of groundwater on privately-owned land. Citizens, previously free to use whatever water was underneath their own land, are now preparing to challenge this governmental undermining of their property rights in court.

Now that landowners will no longer have full rights to the water underneath their own property, the state will have the final say on how much groundwater should be used – complete with power to enforce via fines and fees.

The new laws will create agencies to function as “water police.” Landowners will be required to register wells on their property, which will be monitored with water meters and subject to inspections without consent. If they don’t comply with standards set by faceless bureaucrats, they’ll be subject to penalties or even have their wells shut down.

Restrictions could seriously affect local farmers who use groundwater to grow crops and feed livestock, not to mention use in their own homes. These same farmers produce a considerable percentage of the nation’s produce. Increased regulation may also negatively affect land value.

Full article: http://www.breitbart.com/california/2014/09/18/ca-laws-restrict-groundwater-use-on-private-land/

If there ain't a law, they'll make a law.

Pat

atticus finch
01-08-2015, 15:40
Well with water, if it affects the flow of water in a manner that affects the environment, then you can get into trouble. I think that is understandable in certain ways, but in other ways, it is just government micromanagement of people's lives. And now with the EPA claiming it controls all bodies of water in the United States, they are in particular spreading their tentacles.

I also would not at all be surprised that if you did set up a simple water wheel on a six foot creek and the EPA found out about it, the response would include a full SWAT team with MRAPs.

Nowadays? I'd expect such a response, even before uncle fed shows up I'd expect it from the locals or in concert with them. Everyone involved figuring it to be a career-enhancing opportunity.
I don't know how things are out in the desert nowadays, odds are it's not good given some of the things I hear about going on out there.
20 odd years ago when I lived out there it was a lot different, the meth plague was under full-swing & that was the major way to get yourself into real trouble. Otherwise unless you really managed to fail the attitude exam, especially the essay portion, the popo were still generally inclined to just leave you alone. If they figured you were just doing your thing, it didn't really involve meth or other recreational pharmacology, you had a pretty good chance of them just leaving you to your own thing.
The culture we see nowadays hadn't really hit full swing amongst LEO, although back then it was also starting to develop.
The deputy who I spoke with was a good example of back then, it was obvious somebody had taken a look at my goofy setup, seen tracks from the likely hiding spots headed back to the nearest road. Nothing was stolen (methheads) or vandalized (teenagers)so it had to be LEO of some sort having a look at things. I figured at some point there'd be an unofficial 'meet & greet' to see what I was about & so forth. He showed up & did what I expected, just wanted to see who it was & so forth, it's a safe bet he already had a good look at what I was doing & he was relatively decent about things. His only real comment as I said was "pretty damned clever"
Like you said, nowaday? I'd expect MRAPs, lots of weapons, I'm face-down and/or pets get the worst of it, endless criminal charges, etc.

The Reaper
01-08-2015, 16:04
One thing about going to court against the government.

They have lot of lawyers and they are on salary, so a citizen's chances are poor, unless you get a sympathetic judge, or the ACLU representing you.

TR

atticus finch
01-09-2015, 05:13
One thing about going to court against the government.

They have lot of lawyers and they are on salary, so a citizen's chances are poor, unless you get a sympathetic judge, or the ACLU representing you.

TR

Agreed.
Appearances to the contrary, the law has been rigged & especially at that level the average individual has very little protection or rights under the law.

MtnGoat
01-09-2015, 07:12
CALIFORNIA LAWS RESTRICT GROUNDWATER USE ON PRIVATE LAND

“With the stroke of his pen, the Governor changed over 100 years of water laws – without the people’s input. This is not the democracy Californians deserve.” – State Senator Jim Nielsen

In the midst of drought and heightened overdrafting problems, California passed legislation allowing the state to control and regulate the use of groundwater on privately-owned land. Citizens, previously free to use whatever water was underneath their own land, are now preparing to challenge this governmental undermining of their property rights in court.

Now that landowners will no longer have full rights to the water underneath their own property, the state will have the final say on how much groundwater should be used – complete with power to enforce via fines and fees.

The new laws will create agencies to function as “water police.” Landowners will be required to register wells on their property, which will be monitored with water meters and subject to inspections without consent. If they don’t comply with standards set by faceless bureaucrats, they’ll be subject to penalties or even have their wells shut down.

Restrictions could seriously affect local farmers who use groundwater to grow crops and feed livestock, not to mention use in their own homes. These same farmers produce a considerable percentage of the nation’s produce. Increased regulation may also negatively affect land value.

Full article: http://www.breitbart.com/california/...-private-land/

This now opens the door up to whatever is underneath their own land!! Hello mineral rights!! So if Cali is now saying that the water underneath residents land is now the States property, what is next?? Mineral Rights are from what I know are property rights to exploit the minerals underneath residents land it harbors. I know in some states mineral rights can be separate from property ownership. But if you go back to the homestead act of 1860, people today even if they don't live one that land, but it is still in the family have all rights to the 160 acres.

I see only the rural residents being effected by this.

Team Sergeant
01-09-2015, 09:33
This now opens the door up to whatever is underneath their own land!! Hello mineral rights!! So if Cali is now saying that the water underneath residents land is now the States property, what is next?? Mineral Rights are from what I know are property rights to exploit the minerals underneath residents land it harbors. I know in some states mineral rights can be separate from property ownership. But if you go back to the homestead act of 1860, people today even if they don't live one that land, but it is still in the family have all rights to the 160 acres.

I see only the rural residents being effected by this.

What is next? Surely you jest "comrade". :munchin

Brush Okie
01-09-2015, 09:56
This now opens the door up to whatever is underneath their own land!! Hello mineral rights!! So if Cali is now saying that the water underneath residents land is now the States property, what is next?? Mineral Rights are from what I know are property rights to exploit the minerals underneath residents land it harbors. I know in some states mineral rights can be separate from property ownership. But if you go back to the homestead act of 1860, people today even if they don't live one that land, but it is still in the family have all rights to the 160 acres.

I see only the rural residents being effected by this.

Look it really not THEIR property it belongs to all the citizens of the world. We need to redistribute the wealth to make a better world.

atticus finch
01-18-2015, 07:13
Look it really not THEIR property it belongs to all the citizens of the world. We need to redistribute the wealth to make a better world.



Agenda 21, folks seem to think such things are paranoid "conspiracy theories"
If it's real, it isn't a theory & this is how it gets implemented. Control the land, especially the water, and it gives those who want the power to control anyone the power to do so.