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Mr Weiss
11-04-2014, 14:28
Hello everyone,

I don't post here much, but I felt like I should share this video with you all. I found it while browsing ******* and wondered what you thought. I'm not even sure if it should be online as it might help others G2 the course.

Special Forces Qualification Course, Robin Sage: http://youtu.be/KpJHoNRGDJ4

Quick question: How would you rate the Captain's performance and handling of this scenario? As someone without experience in this field, it appears as though he was losing control of his soldiers.

hotshot
11-04-2014, 14:41
Hello everyone,

I don't post here much, but I felt like I should share this video with you all. I found it while browsing ******* and wondered what you thought. I'm not even sure if it should be online as it might help others G2 the course.

Special Forces Qualification Course, Robin Sage: http://youtu.be/KpJHoNRGDJ4

Quick question: How would you rate the Captain's performance and handling of this scenario? As someone without experience in this field, it appears as though he was losing control of his soldiers.

Your lack of experience reflects in your assessment.

Nothing is textbook in these scenarios; they are designed to present challenges which often times cannot be replicated in training.

CH

Flagg
11-05-2014, 17:38
I'm not going to try and judge performance.

What I observed was a team effort which I presume incorporated some doctrinal and/or team specific immediate action drills when it comes to shaping and influencing the environment. In this case attempting to influence a G chief to sustain the life of a captured/injured enemy pilot, like a tactical Zig Ziglar "How to win friends and influence people".

I saw a Captain who I assume is the A team commander taking a quiet spoken "softly, softly" approach maybe incorporating some predetermined deference to the G Chief tailored for his specific personality, organization, culture's needs.

I'm not sure how to perceive the Captain's offsider who pushed with a bit more assertiveness early in the piece and was pushed back by the G Chief. Maybe part of the team "IA's" to make an assertive probe. Just speculating.

Then the 3rd shorter fella, I presume NCO, tactfully throwing in a few comments in what I presume to be a team effort at shaping the G Chief.

I quite liked how one of the medics were trying to throw in the need for additional basic medical care to retain control of the enemy pilot role player.

I reckon it's pretty hard to judge without having the full spectrum context of the scenario, such as country brief, guerilla org brief, G Chief brief, as well as the ops tempo and recent nutrition/hydration/ rest for the team.

I have to say I was having a good laugh when watching it.

Not out of disrespect, but from the many layers of cognitive problem solving/people skills/mental agility requirements needed during this activity by guys who are probably quite cold/wet/hungry/tired going up against what I presume to be a retired SF NCO putting them through the mental ringer. I'm sure they would be quite mentally drained after a number of those scenarios.

It's easy to judge from comfort with time and space to appreciate it. It would be another thing when cold/wet/hungry/tired having to instantly respond with the culturally/linguistically appropriate words, body language, and actions or face serious consequences.

There would surely be some brain explosions going on. :)

I'm responsible for developing some similar-ish training scenarios and I found this open source example scenario quite useful in encouraging ideas and improvements for our future scenarios.

If there's one training activity I'd love to observe it would be some aspects of the Robin Sage training exercise.

Basically, more scenario/role player stuff like this.

miclo18d
11-05-2014, 19:02
Here's an analogy to help.

NCO: "Do you like me private?"
Private: "Yes Seargent!"
NCO: "Oh, you want to swap spit in the shower, eh?"
Private: "No Seargent, I... Just..."
NCO: "Oh, you don't like me, want to kick my ass, huh?"
Private: "I... Uh... Wha... I... "

You don't "win" the scenario, your not there to out wit a real honest-to-God Team Seargent, you don't "G2" it, you just learn from it. You learn to deal with impossible situations without crying/quitting/curling into a quivering ball of shite. You learn from your mistakes. You take your victories humbly.

That G-chief/TS has so many tricks up his sleeve you wouldn't know whether to shit or wind your wristwatch if he thought you had "G2'd" the scenario. Probably get you a non-select at the very end of the Q-Course too!

CSB
11-05-2014, 19:52
http://www.*******.com/watch?v=E84VqqCPI7w

blue02hd
11-06-2014, 05:50
"Quick question: How would you rate the Captain's performance and handling of this scenario? As someone without experience in this field, it appears as though he was losing control of his soldiers. "

Team Leaders and CPT's don't "control" their men. Everyone has a part to play, and all 12 must pull together to meet their mission or goal. If the CPT doesn't nail that rapport and find that position to influence his counterpart then an NCO must step up. I believe one of the most valuable lessons that can be learned from Robin Sage is how to maximize the Teams assets, and break from the conventional mindset that dictates the guy with the highest rank is the only one to engage in negotiations.

Find the right tool for the job at hand. An experienced and diverse ODA will provide a Team Leader, even a brand new one, with a diverse set of tools. No one person is more important than the other, however it is possible to represent limited value if you can't be a team player.

Mr Weiss
11-06-2014, 12:16
Thank you for explaining the scenario and team dymanics that are taking place here. I now understand that rank doesn't play as much of a role as teamwork and one's own abilities.

Welp, back to PT! :lifter