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LarryW
10-09-2014, 13:08
Used to be called HAM radio I think.

I'm trying to find some sort of retired hobby that may not get me in trouble and thought of learning more about amateur radio clubs. There's one locally.

Wondering if it requires a lot of money to get started, issues re: antenna configuration around the house (I'm fairly rural and don't think my neighbors would care), Morse Code vs voice protocols, etc.

Your comments would be greatly appreciated.

The Reaper
10-09-2014, 14:22
Used to be called HAM radio I think.

I'm trying to find some sort of retired hobby that may not get me in trouble and thought of learning more about amateur radio clubs. There's one locally.

Wondering if it requires a lot of money to get started, issues re: antenna configuration around the house (I'm fairly rural and don't think my neighbors would care), Morse Code vs voice protocols, etc.

Your comments would be greatly appreciated.

You can get started for $100 or so and there is no more Morse Code requirement for the license anymore. You start with the Technician exam, and then move up to General. Advanced licensing leads to more freqs to use. Of course, no license is required to listen, just to transmit.

It is on my list.

TR

nousdefions
10-09-2014, 16:20
It is on my list.

TR

I'm currently studying the ARRL Ham Radio License Manual http://www.amazon.com/Ham-Radio-License-Manual-Arrl/dp/0872590976/ref=pd_sim_b_6?ie=UTF8&refRID=1H71R23S71BGF6G1W9Y0

Don't forget to sign into Amazon with your smile account and choose the GBF as your charity and they'll get a cut.

Enjoy!

Peregrino
10-09-2014, 19:23
Still called Ham Radio. You need a General license if you want to talk long-range. Your local club can provide the VEs to administer the tests, mentor you through the initial steps, and assist you in assembling your "shack". They'll also give you somebody to compare notes with while you get your feet wet. The Technician and General tests are fairly easy with a little study. There are plenty of on-line resources for practice tests, etc. Local clubs usually teach courses which makes for an easy intro to the local Ham community or you can do like I did and buy the study guides from ARRL or Amazon. There are several routes to acquire your equipment, investment will depend on your license (Technician = short range, General = long range, and Amateur Extra = full spectrum), interests, and scrounging ability. I've seen equipment acquired through a combination of luck, Ebay, new equipment purchase, Ham-fest scrounging, and home construction (mostly antennas). HTH.

Koldsteel
10-09-2014, 19:51
You can find local clubs to assist you on www.arrl.org. Good luck and have fun.

Badger52
11-20-2014, 13:56
The Technician and General tests are fairly easy with a little study.Indeed; in fact you should study for both those at minimum since for the same modest testing fee you can keep taking exams till you can't pass one. Much of the same stuff in the Tech is regurgitated on the General, which is really the one that gets you almost all the bandwidth you'll need.

And testing requirement or not, your ham life will be so much the better served by learning the code. CW rules.

BoomerUSMC
11-21-2014, 07:55
When I took the technicians exam, they offered the General for free. That came as a bit of a surprise. So just in case, study for both.

Like guns, HAM is only as expensive as you want it to be. I started out with a mobile 2m radio for the Jeep (Yaesu FT-1900R) and a couple cheap Beofeng UV-5R handhelds for local comms. In a nutshell, you pay more the further you want to reach out.

Local clubs are an excellent start and a vast majority of folks are more than happy to mentor.