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Longstreet
06-26-2014, 07:08
Jayson here and I need some help. Last year I purchased a .22 bullet trap to use when shooting paper targets. During this time I had many issues with the rounds shattering upon impact and driving holes in my targets. I also had problems with the wind moving my targets as well some I had problems with attaching the targets (my bullet trap came with a clipboard clamp, but it took a few rounds and was rendered useless).

So in an attempt to correct this I have attached a wooden frame around the bullet trap and then routered a slit so that I can slide a piece of compressed cardboard - which I will use to attach my targets. By doing this I have solved all of my problems with moving targets and how to attach them. The compressed cardboard is cheap so it will be replaced as needed.

The new problem I now have is that by using a wooden frame, should it get hit it will not hold up. To solve this, I am planning on attaching steel pieces to all wooden parts. And this is where I need help. Given my limited knowledge of .22 ballistics, would it be safe to do this? I have a limited shooting range and will be approximately 20-30 yards from the target. I will be shooting a bolt action Marlin with only iron sites and of course I will be wearing eye protection. Do I need to worry about any ricocheting with my mods? Is there anything else I should be concerned about? Comments or suggestions?


jaYson

Peregrino
06-26-2014, 08:29
Longstreet - a few points off the top of my head:

1. Wood is used because it is replaceable if damaged and doesn't cause ricochetes. Do not put metal guards over your wooden frame. Do not construct the wooden frame so that it obscures the bullet trap. You're inviting more misses if you can't clearly identify the "target zone".
2. Your cardboard backer will last longer if you cut holes in the cardboard under the "bulls".
3. Use .22 Longs. If you're using .22 LR, stick with SV (standard velocity). Don't use Mini-mags or similar. You're shooting a bolt gun, with care during the feeding cycle it'll handle anything, even shorts. You don't need "magnum" rounds for target practice.
4. Do not exceed 10 meters unless you're using optics. That's all that bullet trap was intended for.
5. At this stage you'll probably get more value out of practicing with an air rifle - it's a lot more difficult (NTM safer and cheaper) than you think.

Longstreet
06-26-2014, 22:12
Peregrino,
Jayson here and thanks for the response. I am going to respond to each of the points you made.

1. Wood is used because it is replaceable if damaged and doesn't cause ricochetes. Do not put metal guards over your wooden frame. Do not construct the wooden frame so that it obscures the bullet trap. You're inviting more misses if you can't clearly identify the "target zone".

The clip my bullet catcher came with was ruined when I was honing in a new scope for a different .22 that I own. I made the wooden frame to make it easier to post my targets and to solve the issues I was having with the wind and the shattered bullets. When using my iron sites I am a decent shot and while I am not shooting constant bullseyes, my rounds do hit the intended targets and land safely in my bullet catcher. I was contemplating the steel plating only to preserve the wood in the event I have an 'oops'. Obviously safety is paramount which is why I posted this question before using my bullet catcher. I thought it might be easier to just install the steel plates rather than carry a couple 2x4's. From your input, I will not be using any steel plating. Instead I will carry a few extra 2 x 4's just in case I goof.


2. Your cardboard backer will last longer if you cut holes in the cardboard under the "bulls".

I had not thought of that, but will pull out my jigsaw and change my backer.

3. Use .22 Longs. If you're using .22 LR, stick with SV (standard velocity). Don't use Mini-mags or similar. You're shooting a bolt gun, with care during the feeding cycle it'll handle anything, even shorts. You don't need "magnum" rounds for target practice.

Yup. Nothing special going into my rifle - especially given the level of shooting I do. I use the standard .22 LR ammunition that goes for about $25 a brick. I do prefer rounds that are not hollow point as my other .22 has had a few issues with such bullets.

4. Do not exceed 10 meters unless you're using optics. That's all that bullet trap was intended for.

For my first .22 I bought a Savage and made it real tacticool. I will admit I am a sucker for the tactical look and set up my rifle with a bipod and scope. And while I love shooting it, I find it very heavy and can only shoot it while in the prone position. Since my current setup is about 20-25 yards, the scoped gun was total overkill. So I purchased another bolt action, but this one I want it keep stock so I can better hone my skills using just iron sights.

5. At this stage you'll probably get more value out of practicing with an air rifle - it's a lot more difficult (NTM safer and cheaper) than you think.


I have grown up with plinking various air rifles and wanted to move onto an actual firearm. For the amount of time I actually get in to shoot I probably should have just stayed with the air rifles, but I really wanted to start firing real (for lack of a better word) firearms. Shooting handguns in Canada is a PITA so I still do make use of airguns albeit pellet handguns.

Again Peregrino thank you so much for your time and help. I do greatly appreciate it.


jaYson