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View Full Version : SOF Uses SG Block Procedure for PTSD


Kasik
04-29-2014, 10:35
Last year I attended SOMA in Tampa where Dr. Mulvaney and his medical team gave a talk on their use of the Stellate Ganglion Block for treatment of Combat PTSD.

It was an incredible presentation with two active duty operators (senior enlisted) who'd had the block sharing their experiences and outcomes.

To date, over 300 SOF operators/personnel have received the SG Block under Dr. Mulvaney direction.

Many of these are re-deploying OCONUS in their MOS duty descriptions.

Mulvaney has published on the procedure.

I've provided a link that describes it and refers to Dr. Mulvaney's work.

http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleID=1209447

The procedure is provided at Tripler Army Hospital in Hawaii, as well. To my immediate knowledge this is the only MTF doing so currently.

The VA is not offering this procedure for PTSD although it is a common procedure for pain management.

Dr. Mulvaney told me a candidate for the block can arrange for the procedure in the private sector. Locating a PHY who specializes in pain management and uses the SGB as a procedure, then interviewing with him/her, is the way to start.

TriCare DOES cover this procedure for PTSD treatment.

The process is to inverview with the attending PHY - complete the PCL worksheet - attach, for example, Dr. Mulvaney's published study on the procedure for PTSD with the attending PHY statement - have PHY forward to TriCAre for review / approval.

If it's good enough for SOF to be currently using and seeing excellent results in symptoms management - to the point of redeployment - it is a worthwhile procedure to look into if you are active SOF or Veteran.

SOCOM Care Coalition is aware of this procedure, as well. As is the Green Beret Foundation.

:lifter

Kasik
04-30-2014, 10:48
Two good information links on this procedure -

We are preparing to "get the word" out at the Green Beret Foundation on this for those who may be interested and good candidates -

http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/article.aspx?articleID=1209447

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/09/21/doctor-injection-can-cure-ptsd-in-veterans/

:lifter

Kasik
05-05-2014, 12:23
Since 2009 I've worked with our Wounded Warriors in a non-clinical role.

First with the SOCOM Care Coalition as a senior advocate and presently locally with Veteran, conventional and SOF force patients of which many are working their way toward meaningful recovery from Combat PTSD.

I just found this very good news story on the evolving SGB procedure which SOCOM docs have now done of 300 of in our community.

Pass it along if you know someone who may be interested.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MIoMaObfI-o

charlietwo
05-05-2014, 12:49
Kasik

Shoot me an email - blake@greenberetfoundation.org

I'll do what I can to move this up.

Kasik
05-05-2014, 16:06
Inbound. Jen / Scott Heintz at CC already in the loop:)

VVVV
05-05-2014, 17:28
Another type of therapy in Tampa.

http://hscweb3.hsc.usf.edu/blog/2013/12/09/new-brief-therapy-eases-symptoms-of-combat-related-psychological-trauma-usf-nursing-study-shows/

Kasik
05-06-2014, 12:08
ART has been recommended / SOF personnel referred to it by SOCOM Care Coalition for several years now.

It's another good care/treatment tool for the clinician and patient.

One of the best books / study guides on combat PTSD available is "War and the Soul" by Dr. Ed Tick.

Written for the layperson this book was / is recommended by Care Coalition for both the Service Member and friends/family. I made a number of copies available to those I was blessed to advocate for during my tenure with CC.

I've met and worked with Dr. Tick to include taking a group of SOF/family members to his retreat in Northern Georgia about two years ago. He continues to be called upon by the CC and has conducted DoD training in support of his approach with the Chaplains Corps.

http://www.soldiersheart.net/

Again, SOCOM in specific is literally at the "Tip of the Spear" where openess and quality care and treatment for its operators, support personnel and their families are concerned.

We need to keep getting this message out.