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alelks
03-04-2014, 22:23
This is different. I use to like the IV breaching charges and it looks like this does pretty much the same thing. Of course there is one HUGE negative. You can't be stacked by the door when someone uses this method.

http://www.israelvideonetwork.com/brilliant-huge-boom-tiny-bullet

Brush Okie
03-04-2014, 22:30
NICE!

Anyone here used one or is it just a R&D type now?

Granted I like an AT-4 better but that will do. :D

mojaveman
03-04-2014, 22:55
The length of the device makes it look like it would be a little akward to carry during close quarters tactical operations. I would have like to seen what it would have done employed against the cinderblock wall.

MtnGoat
03-05-2014, 05:10
It's not new, it has been around for a few years. I don't know of anyone that has used it or tested it.

It me the size would suck to carry around. Unlike a ridged, this is being carried around on the battlefield. For how long? Ridged your going in and using it quick. I want not like to have to carry this after all day.

miclo18d
03-05-2014, 05:51
5.5 oz of comp C-4 (I don't know what they use but that is the gold standard) is A LOT for a CQB charge! You won't catch me stacked on that door! It would be great for a target that you can't get your breaching team to the door without compromise I guess, well within 30 meters. I would just cut the fields of fire of my defensive position back to 50m...:confused:

Cool concept though. It would be great for MOUT, but then as someone pointed out, that's what AT-4's are for!:D

JJ_BPK
03-05-2014, 07:02
It's not new..
I think the RPG (seven series) is just as effective??

SIMON breach grenade

The SIMON is a rifle grenade designed to breach through doors, developed by Rafael Advanced Defense Systems. It is intended for use with 5.56 mm rifles such as the M4 carbine.

A variant of the SIMON 120 is in service with the U.S. Army as the M100 Grenade Rifle Entry Munition (GREM). Changes from the original specification involved fuzing and reliability issues.[3] An inert round, the M101 GREM-Target Practice (GREM-TP) allows training for accuracy without the explosive hazard.

The system was given a U.S. Army award as one of the top ten best inventions of 2005.

Guy
03-05-2014, 08:46
The number of ways I could come up with shooting this is crazy:


Windows
Walls
Vehicles
Arching fire
Watercraft
Aircraft
Animals
Mine fields
Enemy and friendly OPs.
etc.

mark46th
03-05-2014, 08:56
It looks like a big lawn dart... but, as previously mentioned, I can see some situations where it would be useful...

mojaveman
03-05-2014, 10:01
The number of ways I could come up with shooting this is crazy:


Windows
Walls
Vehicles
Arching fire
Watercraft
Aircraft
Animals Mine fields
Enemy and friendly OPs.
etc.


What kind of animals and in what situation Guy? A sentry dog? :D

MR2
03-05-2014, 19:06
What kind of animals and in what situation Guy? A sentry dog? :D

A flood of Hollywood style scenarios came to mind. I'll keep them to myself as we don't want any unsupervised SEALs lurking about to run off half-cocked...

Lmmsoat
03-05-2014, 20:40
Had a long conversation with a buddy who has used these. They are extremely effective and often used as a primary breach method. The long rod on the front is removable (screw on). The round can be carried on the back of your kit strapped vertically, the weight is not noticeable. Not sure of explosive type, but he said it feels like a triple strand when it goes off. Same effects on target. He said you needed a solid door though. Told me of several SNAFUS with glass in doors.

It uses a bullet trap method for launch similar to the old french rifle grenades. No blanks required. Kick is pretty noticeable due to the bullet trap. Average firing distance varied by target. 30 meters being the longest reliable shot. Of course the US Army tested the product, but in keeping with tradition ruined a good thing. The Army required a redesign requesting less kick and lower net explosives. Less kick to accommodate soldiers of "smaller stature" (females) and less explosives to reduce ricochet risk. Of course less kick meant less range, which meant reducing net explosives even more. I think they call it the GREM.

badshot
03-06-2014, 03:30
What kind of animals and in what situation Guy? A sentry dog? :D
Multitool - hit a cow, no cooking required, just dig in :D

JJ_BPK
03-06-2014, 04:38
Multitool - hit a cow, no cooking required, just dig in :D

Way back, When I was just starting on a team, we experimented with different delivery systems in an attempt to capitalize on available assets.

Most did not taste good,, at least what was left over... :D

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/16th-century-manual-shows-rocket-cat-weaponry