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Dusty
02-28-2014, 13:43
I'm gonna put one of these things together most ricky tick.

Looks like it would save time and timber...

http://www.richsoil.com/rocket-stove-mass-heater.jsp

Bob45nm
02-28-2014, 15:15
:)Good choice, I have been making the portable models of these for camping and fishing trips, they are great and don't use much wood at all.

cbtengr
02-28-2014, 15:25
Looks real slick, be sure to document the construction and let us know how it comes out.

BMT (RIP)
02-28-2014, 15:27
Does the EPA like or approve?? :D

BMT

Dusty
02-28-2014, 16:42
Does the EPA like or approve?? :D

BMT

It's right at 100% efficient. Even burns the smoke. :eek:

I don't know what they'd complain about.

I've already burned 18 rick this year, and I've got 5+ in a pile outside...

Dusty
02-28-2014, 16:43
:)Good choice, I have been making the portable models of these for camping and fishing trips, they are great and don't use much wood at all.

Got a good pdf on a cement version? :munchin

JJ_BPK
02-28-2014, 16:50
Got a good pdf on a cement version? :munchin

It would be very nice if you could imbed copper lines in the concrete and feed some of the heat to your water heater. OR feed an in floor glycerin heating system.

Pete
02-28-2014, 16:57
Looks like somebody super sized a Solo Stove

http://www.solostove.com/how-solo-stoves-work/

Backpackers have been using them for years.

PSM
02-28-2014, 17:03
Even burns the smoke. :eek:



Our Quadra-Fire free standing stove does, too: http://www.*******.com/watch?v=Pqx4Nwc8udA In fact, it seems to use a similar, but more complicated, system to the rocket stove.

It takes a while to learn to control it, though. The first few fires each year I manage to set off the smoke alarms. :o

It's a pretty show when the tertiary burn is the only burning visible. It's like a colorful plasma looking fire.

Pat

Dusty
02-28-2014, 17:15
It would be very nice if you could imbed copper lines in the concrete and feed some of the heat to your water heater. OR feed an in floor glycerin heating system.

Lotta potential. :cool:

PRB
02-28-2014, 17:19
My wife says I have efficient wood but I'm not sure if that is a compliment or not

The Reaper
02-28-2014, 17:34
My wife says I have efficient wood but I'm not sure if that is a compliment or not

Sounds better than her saying you have "inefficient wood."

The EPA has decided that most woodstoves are not good for you, so they are making most of the old designs illegal.

Knowing the EPA, the new ones won't pollute as much, nor will they work very well.

TR

Bob45nm
02-28-2014, 20:45
Dusty: I build mine out of #10 cans and soup cans I have them in both my truck and Jeep, they are cheap and easy to make. If you go to You Tube and type in Rocket Stove you will get a wealth of information.

On You Tube some of the better units are built by ppoty1,KSPrepper1,tryin2ihard.

I hope this helps, for some reason the site won't let me post attachments.

Dusty
03-01-2014, 05:14
I hope this helps, for some reason the site won't let me post attachments.

I know. Had the same problem while trying to post a pic of one of my legendary whitetail trophies.

I haven't been able to play ******* vids for a while; my ISP is "putting in new fibers", but soon I'll check 'em out.

A general picture is beginning to emerge of a "high speed, low drag hobo stove"...

craigepo
03-01-2014, 08:08
I wonder what materials a person would have to use in constructing the heater to make sure it would be approved by a homeowners insurance company?

Dusty
03-01-2014, 08:14
I wonder what materials a person would have to use in constructing the heater to make sure it would be approved by a homeowners insurance company?

Good question.

I talked to a guy who's building a "tiny house", and he's gonna heat it with a cement-based rocket heater with a 6-inch pipe. He says the system has been accepted in one state, and he's not worried about it.

Don't know how much you'd have to insure a 400 square foot house for, though...;)

The Reaper
03-01-2014, 10:45
I would expect that a building inspector might not approve of it either, if you were subject to building codes.

TR

craigepo
03-01-2014, 11:41
You know, if I were going to install that heater in a building where I was going to be sleeping, I would probably spend a little more money than what was shown on the heaters in the videos.

We don't have any building codes here, and folks used to line their chimneys with ceramic flues. Ceramic worked fine for a while, but once you have a creosote buildup, which starts an unknown flue fire, the ceramic can crack, which can later result in a house fire. So, insurance companies started making everyone line their chimneys with stainless steel.

I wonder if you could find stainless steel flue material to use inside that thing, then put your cement/stone/whatever substance on top of the steel?

Also, regarding running the exhaust out of the house, if you are installing the heater into a wood frame home, you want some temperature barrier between the flue and the wall/roof. I have a pellet stove in my present farm house, and they are so efficient they only need 3-inch flue material, with a pre-fab fitting holding the flue in place in the wall. I wonder how these folks are setting up their chimneys...

Dusty
03-01-2014, 12:20
I would expect that a building inspector might not approve of it either, if you were subject to building codes.

TR

No such thing up here.

The Reaper
03-01-2014, 12:50
No such thing up here.

Anyone here remember the number of GIs lost in Korea from charcoal floor heating?

I would definitely want a carbon monoxide detector with a heating system like this.

TR

JJ_BPK
03-01-2014, 13:21
I would definitely want a carbon monoxide detector with a heating system like this.

TR

The box (both bricks and mortar) needs to be refractory grade materials.

The different ******* flicks for rocket stoves, fire pits, and these mass type heaters built using concrete block or pavers is a fail. The pavers are air dried and don't use clay. Concrete will dry rot, crack, and fail after moderate use.

cbtengr
03-02-2014, 16:50
It looks like a great concept, but certainly not refined. I did not get the impression from any of the folks in the videos that they were the type to be bothered by insurance company approval, and these were not quarter of a million dollar houses that these things were installed in. The first several years that my wife and I lived here we burned corn, it was less than $2.00 a bushel then, we could heat 1700 sg ft for about $300.00 a season, the stove vented horizontally out the side of the house, triple wall SS pipe very efficient, it too was a QUADRA-FIRE.

I would have to believe that this concept has a lot of potential were it to be more than cobbled together by the Mother Earth Crowd :D . I do like it though.

Dusty
03-03-2014, 05:50
It looks like a great concept, but certainly not refined. I did not get the impression from any of the folks in the videos that they were the type to be bothered by insurance company approval, and these were not quarter of a million dollar houses that these things were installed in. .

I'm building one for the "E" section of "PACE", when insurance companies no longer exist, and firewood becomes a hot commodity.

The stove I have now is fine for the status quo.

Golf1echo
03-03-2014, 12:53
Always thought rocket stoves were external type stoves however IIRC I have seen similar used as part of a forge in work shops. Older wood stoves often had pipes with in to heat water as the stove was fired and stored in an adjacent tank ( convectively heated ). There are also external wood furnaces that burn large logs and scrap wood and transfer the heat underground to the home, perhaps a similar application would work?
As for what material would work best for inspection? I would say a tarp, Inspectors tend to have little imagination and their job is CYA mostly." Out of sight out of mind". My last insurance inspection said " Suspected of using solid fuel". WTF? That house is in the mountains and most everyone burns wood there...

cbtengr
03-03-2014, 15:54
As for what material would work best for inspection? I would say a tarp, Inspectors tend to have little imagination and their job is CYA mostly." Out of sight out of mind". My last insurance inspection said " Suspected of using solid fuel". WTF? That house is in the mountains and most everyone burns wood there...

Suspected?? That is some pretty funny shit, did that statement serve to cover his ass?

Paslode
03-05-2014, 07:17
I would expect that a building inspector might not approve of it either, if you were subject to building codes.

TR

Like this lady....


Robin Speronis decided to live without utilities such as running water and electricity in a modest home in Cape Coral, Florida, but she made the mistake of discussing her lifestyle with reporter Liza Fernandez from Channel 4. The day after the report on Speronis aired, a city code enforcement officer designated her home an “uninhabitable property” and gave her an eviction notice.

Yet a code enforcement officer found her home and declared it unsafe and unsanitary because it lacked running water and electricity, Speronis said. Speronis alleged that the officer never entered her home or checked to see if it was unsanitary. The official simply posted the notice and left.

City officials said they were simply enforcing the International Property Maintenance Code. That code states that properties are unsafe to live in without electricity or running water. Of course, Speronis does have electricity and water; she simply gets them from alternative sources.

Under the terms of the code, the city could seize the home and evict Speronis.

http://www.offthegridnews.com/2013/12/16/florida-city-evicting-woman-for-living-off-the-grid/


Per the ICC Code the Building Official, members of the Board of Appeals, or employee charged with enforcement of the code cannot be held liable.

Per ICC Code the Building Official can enter your property anytime they damn well please.

Per ICC Code the Building Official is the last word in regards to a Thumbs Up or Thumbs Down rulings on your property.


The God Complex is a common trait among Building Officials, members of the Board and Adversary Council.

Dusty
03-08-2014, 06:06
This model's easy to throw together:

http://www.*******.com/watch?v=kmDYUrVHPWc

cbtengr
03-08-2014, 07:42
This model's easy to throw together:

http://www.*******.com/watch?v=kmDYUrVHPWc

That's pretty slick. It would be easy to diffuse that heat over a larger surface.