PDA

View Full Version : Tough Situation


jatx
11-02-2004, 10:54
Okay, I am a civilian so bear with me.

I like to hike with my dog. If I were to find myself in a similar predicament, it would most likely be due to some numbskull move on my part in that context. I have never killed a small animal using a snare/my hands/an improvised tool/a lensatic compass or a space blanket, only with a firearm, slingshot or bow, so I have no perspective on how easily that can be accomplished with proper training. I also assume that 60 days of only forraging would weaken me too much to allow room for other contingencies.

So my question is - at what point would you eat the dog?

The psychological benefits of the animal's companionship are not to be underestimated. Nor is its ability to scare off/alert you of predators. OTOH, its pelt would be quite warm, the protein is attractive, and it is a veritable walking toolkit. This dog is about 50 lbs. I am also confident in my ability to properly preserve the meat in the field, so nothing will go to waste.

Don't laugh at me, my father taught me to hunt with black powder and used to take me to rendesvous on weekends, so my view of the world is a little warped.

:munchin

Team Sergeant
11-02-2004, 11:02
jatx,

You deserve your own thread!!!

(You've got me laughing in my coffee.)

(Don't you dare delete your post, I'm sure you will get some answers. ;) )

The Team Sergeant

BTW, jatx, go and rent this movie tonight.

"A Boy and his Dog" you will enjoy it. :D

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072730/

Achilles
11-02-2004, 11:24
Shit jatx, I wouldn't want to be your dog!! :boohoo

Guy
11-02-2004, 11:47
Teach the dog how to hunt and hopefully it will share its kill with you...if not...

Kill the dog and eat it! :D

Razor
11-02-2004, 14:28
According to the book "Undaunted Courage", the Lewis and Clark expedition ate dogs acquired from native Americans on several occasions when game was hard to find. I believe Clark even mentioned that they tasted quite good.

NousDefionsDoc
11-02-2004, 18:13
Excellent thread and question! However, we need more information to give your a valid answer:
1. What breed and size of dog is it?
2. How long have you had the dog?
3. Can you even take the dog in a fight in a survival situation?
4. How would you cook the dog?
5. Will you have to justify your actions to anyone later?
6. Do you have a story as to the dog's status already prepared?
7. Do you carry dog food with you when you hike with the dog?
8. Is the dog stupid enough to fall for a ruse?

I will tell you right now you can forget about the liver and heart - parasites.

jatx
11-02-2004, 20:00
NDD,

1. The dog is a female Rhodesian Ridgeback. They were apparently bred to hunt mountain lions or some such, but I can only ascertain from her behavior that this was many generations ago. Her name is Lily and she's roughly 45 pounds.

2. I've had the dog for two years. She sleeps at the foot of the bed.

3. I can almost certainly take her in a fight. I'll bet I could get her in a hammer lock (she's very trusting) until she passed out, then smash her with a big rock. I'm open to other suggestions, though, if they don't violate OPSEC. :)

4. My plan is to make jerky. Jerky will keep a good, long time so long as it doesn't get wet. I could either hang the strips of meat to dry (well away from camp) or smoke them. My preference would be smoking, since it would be faster and pose less health risk, but I would need some good, dry hardwood that I could burn down to charcoal. The one limitation I'd have would be availability of salt to make a brine solution, but you can do without that in a pinch.

5. My ex-wife loved the dog. I'd send her some of the jerky.

6. See 5 above.

7. I do carry some dry food, usually about two pounds, which would feed her for about two weeks on reduced rations, longer if she wasn't out wandering around and burning calories. My thought here is that it would be better to avoid the dog food myself, since I don't know what it would do to my GI tract and I wouldn't want to lose precious electrolytes throwing up or with the squirts. Also, controlling the food means I control her. I don't want my "survival rations" wandering off and not coming back.

8. See 3 above.

casey
11-02-2004, 20:23
What was that whump sound.... INCOMING!!!!!!

NousDefionsDoc
11-02-2004, 20:25
Ok, I thought you were screwed until you got to #5. In your malnourished delirium, the dog will assume your ex's face. So no problem with the actual deed itself.

Two years-old shouldn't be too old for jerky. Figure about 5 pounds, ridgebacks are pretty lean. For a more complete meal, you could make pemmican, but you'll need a little fat. So be sure you don't eat the dog food, feed it to the dog. And don't wait too long.

Hope that helps.

Bill Harsey
11-02-2004, 20:49
NDD,

1. The dog is a female Rhodesian Ridgeback. They were apparently bred to hunt mountain lions or some such, but I can only ascertain from her behavior that this was many generations ago. Her name is Lily and she's roughly 45 pounds.

2. I've had the dog for two years. She sleeps at the foot of the bed.

3. I can almost certainly take her in a fight. I'll bet I could get her in a hammer lock (she's very trusting) until she passed out, then smash her with a big rock. I'm open to other suggestions, though, if they don't violate OPSEC. :)

4. My plan is to make jerky. Jerky will keep a good, long time so long as it doesn't get wet. I could either hang the strips of meat to dry (well away from camp) or smoke them. My preference would be smoking, since it would be faster and pose less health risk, but I would need some good, dry hardwood that I could burn down to charcoal. The one limitation I'd have would be availability of salt to make a brine solution, but you can do without that in a pinch.

5. My ex-wife loved the dog. I'd send her some of the jerky.

6. See 5 above.

7. I do carry some dry food, usually about two pounds, which would feed her for about two weeks on reduced rations, longer if she wasn't out wandering around and burning calories. My thought here is that it would be better to avoid the dog food myself, since I don't know what it would do to my GI tract and I wouldn't want to lose precious electrolytes throwing up or with the squirts. Also, controlling the food means I control her. I don't want my "survival rations" wandering off and not coming back.

8. See 3 above.
Ok, We don't have to waste time debating if your a warped puppy or not. That's solved. Keep the dog, I had to face several Rhodesion Ridgebacks every time i visited Col. Applegates house on business. (more story to follow...) They are a strong and loyal breed. They are bred to hunt lions in Africa. If both of you are in starvation mode that dog can still outhunt your ass. Keep the dog.

Roguish Lawyer
11-02-2004, 20:53
Thank you, God!

Bill Harsey
11-02-2004, 21:02
Thank you, God!
Gods busy tonight, he sent me.

Team Sergeant
11-02-2004, 21:04
Gods busy tonight, he sent me.

LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL

TS

Ambush Master
11-02-2004, 21:39
Gods busy tonight, he sent me.

ROTFLMMFAO/REPEAT/REPEAT/REPEAT...

vsvo
11-02-2004, 23:15
Please pardon the tangent, but this reminds me of some lore among my fellow Vietnamese immigrants. Back in 1975 we were all FOB (fresh off the boat, or C-141 Starlifter in my case). So this immigrant with a limited grasp of the English language walks into a supermarket for the first time and is suitably awed. He freaks out when he walks into the pet food aisle and starts throwing cans labeled dog food into the cart. His American sponsor is baffled because the family didn't own a dog. After much excited pointy-talky, the sponsor realizes the guy can't believe the Americans would package this delicacy so neatly and conveniently into cans. Imagine his reaction when he stumbles upon the hot dogs......oh well, so much for immigrant humor...

Guy
11-03-2004, 09:05
Gods busy tonight, he sent me.

ROTFLMMFAO! :D

Wannakuba
05-12-2005, 19:21
So my question is - at what point would you eat the dog?

Hey, at least it's free. You could go to Korea and pay $30 for only a plateful.

zeroalpha
05-12-2005, 20:51
but then again...

what if the dog decides that it needs some food and you start to look appetising?

Maybe it wont be you having to worry about eating the dog.... :D

jbour13
05-12-2005, 23:53
Would the dog be worth all of the potential diseases and parasites she is due to get in a survival setting. I'm thinking Frontline is hard to come by and the amount of ticks, fleas and other lovelies might not be worth the hassle.

Weigh your options, if she is a hunter and is efficient and not over zealous in the kill I'd keep her. Dogs are pack animals and as such will follow the strongest in the pack. You start slacking she'll bolt on you to ensure her own survival. Give her a reason to stay (leash works pretty well) and she'll be beneficial. If you start to starve I can guarantee that she'll not be your starvin' Marvin buddy.

I personally have never encountered a situation were I'd have to eat something I have a connection to. I will confirm that dog is not that bad. I had a trip to Thailand and was told that my T-bone was indeed real. Bull$h!t....... I have good sized hands but....T-bones are not supposed to fit in the palm of your hand. Palm.....not including fingers. Also the meat was a little grey.

My basis for comparison......2000 acres and 200+ head of cattle. I know a little about the bovine persuasion. :D

Bill Harsey
09-01-2005, 09:36
jbour13,
I missed your last post on the first go-round.
I guess the designation of T-Bone related to the cut, not the species. :D

How'd it taste?

jbour13
09-01-2005, 10:05
jbour13,
I missed your last post on the first go-round.
I guess the designation of T-Bone related to the cut, not the species. :D

How'd it taste?

Like kibble!!! :D

Actually wasn't too bad, a little tough but not too bad.

As you well know, the taste of an animal is a direct reflection of what they ingest. I'm sure he had eaten some rats and other dumped goodies around the area.

And yes, I know what a rat tastes like too. ;)

Thailand is a great place to try insects too. They have open air markets with bushel baskets full of worms, crickets (which stink...bad) scorpions and even the common cockroach. If I were to pick a favorite it'd have to be deep fried scorpions. They taste a bit like burnt hot dogs.

In any regard, hot sauce is your friend!

These are one of the common scorpions in Thailand. Like a bee sting if you get hit by one. Some people can have a bad reaction just like bee stings. They average about 10cm long so they are a good eat.

Edited to add: Mr. Harsey, we're still waiting on the stories of COL Applegates Rhodesian Ridgebacks. :D

Diablo Blanco
07-01-2008, 03:50
NDD,

1. The dog is a female Rhodesian Ridgeback. They were apparently bred to hunt mountain lions or some such, but I can only ascertain from her behavior that this was many generations ago. Her name is Lily and she's roughly 45 pounds.

2. I've had the dog for two years. She sleeps at the foot of the bed.

3. I can almost certainly take her in a fight. I'll bet I could get her in a hammer lock (she's very trusting) until she passed out, then smash her with a big rock. I'm open to other suggestions, though, if they don't violate OPSEC. :)

4. My plan is to make jerky. Jerky will keep a good, long time so long as it doesn't get wet. I could either hang the strips of meat to dry (well away from camp) or smoke them. My preference would be smoking, since it would be faster and pose less health risk, but I would need some good, dry hardwood that I could burn down to charcoal. The one limitation I'd have would be availability of salt to make a brine solution, but you can do without that in a pinch.

5. My ex-wife loved the dog. I'd send her some of the jerky.

6. See 5 above.

7. I do carry some dry food, usually about two pounds, which would feed her for about two weeks on reduced rations, longer if she wasn't out wandering around and burning calories. My thought here is that it would be better to avoid the dog food myself, since I don't know what it would do to my GI tract and I wouldn't want to lose precious electrolytes throwing up or with the squirts. Also, controlling the food means I control her. I don't want my "survival rations" wandering off and not coming back.

8. See 3 above.

Weird, I know a girl who was married to a guy also in the military and they had two Rhodesian Ridgebacks. Her name started and ended with an L.

That being said. To answer your question. I would never kill the dog. I might eat it though. That dog and my current dog could both outhunt me with no weapons. They're smart enough to team up with you for a larger kill as well. Chances are the dog would share it's food with you though.

In reality, the dog would probably get bit by a poisonous snake and die before I had a chance to kill it.