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View Full Version : You want "mindset"...


Richard
02-25-2013, 22:36
...this is the "mindset" SF is noted for having.

http://www.professionalsoldiers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=39992

DOL, J.

Richard :munchin

SF18C
02-25-2013, 22:53
It is unbelievably remarkable and utterly inspirational to get those updates from J. From the moment I read the first post until todays I can't even imagine how I would fair under the same circumstances.

I will admit when I watched the Nat Geo show about the PJs rescuing the SF medic from an IED hit, I will just come out and say it, I shed a tear thinking about you, J, and how just life changing October 28th was for you.

But your remarkable resolve to persevere is awe inspiring, I know not everyday is a good day and some days are just down right hard...but your postings show that you are a positive person working towards a goal. I have said many times in my life, "If you can't change the situation, change your attitude," well you are the living embodiment of that sentiment.

J, you do exemplify the truest meaning of warrior, a fighter and a Special Forces Solider. I await the day to buy a drink! If you ever need anything do not hesitate to ask my Brother!

Bracholi
03-06-2013, 03:12
A friend from my first attempt at college also is very inspiring to me.

http://www.wtsp.com/news/local/story.aspx?storyid=152964

He's doing well, functioning far beyond expectations. Hopefully some day I'll get to jump down to TX and reintroduce myself to him. It seems God sends the greatest challenges to the best of men.

miclo18d
03-06-2013, 08:17
I read the recover posts that he wrote in that forum to my wife we were both blown away by his attitude.

A friend of mine at 7th Group was wounded in our last month of our deployment in 2003. Two others were killed during the ambush. I was at the hospital at KAF when they came in. I didn't even recognize him with his beard and asked his name which he told me. The anesthesiologist did a rapid sequence intubation while I stuffe gauze in a fist sized wound tract in the retroperitoneal area and on into the surgical suite to try to save his right kidney without success. He took 12 units of blood in that time.

A long story short. He was in surgery all night and was flown out to Landstuhl within 12 hours. He was medically retired that night by our Bn surg because to them he was expectant. He lived and was MEBd, though I don't know the full process, he fought it, recovered and worked at Bn S-3 shop for several years. Eventually he fought back to get on a team and last time I saw him he was living the dream jumping at 12,999 ft on a HALO team.

These are our SF warriors.

mikem04rubi
07-25-2013, 20:40
I read the recover posts that he wrote in that forum to my wife we were both blown away by his attitude.

A friend of mine at 7th Group was wounded in our last month of our deployment in 2003. Two others were killed during the ambush. I was at the hospital at KAF when they came in. I didn't even recognize him with his beard and asked his name which he told me. The anesthesiologist did a rapid sequence intubation while I stuffe gauze in a fist sized wound tract in the retroperitoneal area and on into the surgical suite to try to save his right kidney without success. He took 12 units of blood in that time.

A long story short. He was in surgery all night and was flown out to Landstuhl within 12 hours. He was medically retired that night by our Bn surg because to them he was expectant. He lived and was MEBd, though I don't know the full process, he fought it, recovered and worked at Bn S-3 shop for several years. Eventually he fought back to get on a team and last time I saw him he was living the dream jumping at 12,999 ft on a HALO team.



These are our SF warriors.

Wow!