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Richard
02-25-2013, 13:59
Need a 'creatie' solution to an issue - just throw $$ at it. :rolleyes:

We had the 2 pouch stock kits, but preferred making our own to fit in those plastic, hinged-lid, bandaid containers for friction taping to our harness.

And so it goes...

Richard :munchin

You’re a SEAL Stranded in Hostile Territory: What’s in Your Survival Kit?
Time, 21 Feb 2013

SEALs aren’t supposed to find themselves in trouble that they can’t get out of. That’s why the Navy is seeking to buy 300 new survival kits for the Naval Special Warfare Development Group, sometimes known as Navy SEAL Team 6.

They’re the guys who raided Osama bin Laden’s compound in May 2011 and sent him on an all-expenses-paid trip to the bottom of the Indian Ocean. Save for the downed stealthy MH-60 Black Hawk chopper, the mission was a grand success. But, being military men, they have to prepare for worst-case scenarios. That’s where Wednesday’s solicitation for what they call Personnel Recovery and Survival Kits comes in.

“The Naval Special Warfare Development Group (NSWDG) has a requirement to procure personnel recovery and survival kits (part number 0293-D) on a brand name or equal basis,” it says. “The brand name is SOLKOA. If quoting an equal product, vendor shall provide all salient characteristics in order to be considered for award.”

While Navy folks didn’t rush to answer Battleland’s questions about how much the kits are expected to cost, and if they’ve changed recently, it’s neat to peek inside to see what’s there.

But first of all, the SEALs have been known to wreck things. Like helicopters. So the survival kits – a complete kit includes both hard and soft cases — have to be able to endure SEAL abuse.

The hard case is 4-by-2-by-1.2 inches, weighing six ounces or less, and available in both “Desert Tan” or “OD/Forest Green.”

Beyond those particulars, the hard case shall be:

– Capable of limited cooking without effecting the container finish (i.e. paint bubbling)

– Capable of being used as a limited digging implement without affecting its ability to house contents (simultaneous function of digging and housing not required).

– Shall have a weather resistant gasket able to keep out water during minor water immersion (i.e. river crossings, swimming)

– Shall have a fastening system that is reuseable and secure to prevent accidental openings

– Top surface of kit must have permanently affixed a 2” x 3” piece of loop fastener (i.e. soft side of velcro)

– Ruggedized to take heavy abuse while carried without damage to inner contents

– Case shall securely hold all items below without rattling or other noises.

The soft case, measuring 3.5 by 2.25 inches, will feature a U.S. flag patch (so much for keeping your nationality secret, although one has to believe it’s removable), be “subdued desert in color” and feature a “hook fastener (i.e. hard side of velcro) sewed to back with a slit in order to store and retrieve contents below yet hold contents down while worn.”

The SEAL’s hard-storage case will contain (quoting directly from the solicitation):

1. Mini-Multi Tool with:

a. Stainless Steel
b. Pliers
c. Wire cutter
d. File
e. Awl
f. Packaged so as to not rattle in case

2. Button Compass

a. Quality AA
b. 14mm
c. Liquid dampened
d. Minimum 8 hour luminous

3. LED Squeeze Light

a. Red
b. Continuous or Momentary Switch

4. Fire Starting Kit

a. Ferro cerium rod not to exceed 3”L x 8mm W
b. Tinder tabs (4) packaged in reclosing bag.

5. Water Storage Device

a. 2L capacity
b. Able to hold all contents of the kit
c. Must be sealable and reuseable
d. Must be odor proof

6. Water Purification Tablets

a. 40 tablets
b. Packaged in amber, medical grade borosilicate

7. Electrolyte Tablets

a. 2 tablets

8. Signal Mirror

a. 2”x 3”
B. Non-mirrored side covered with an IR reflective material
c. Mirror side must be protected to prevent scratches. Protective cover must be able to be removed with one hand.
d. Must have an aiming hole

9. Thermal Blanket

a. 21” x 56” x .05mil
b. Polyester, aluminized
c. 1 side silver, other side orange
d. Packaged in plastic with easy tear pre-cuts

10. Kevlar Line

a. Yellow or green in color
b. 188lb test
c. 15 feet in length
d. Packaged in plastic with easy tear pre-cuts

11. Safety Pins

a. Two #2 (1.5” steel)
b. Two #00 (.75” brass)
c. Packaged in plastic with easy tear pre-cuts.

12. P-38 can opener

a. Packaged so as to not rattle while in case.

13. Stainless Steel Wire

a. 2’ of 20ga

14. Duct Tape

a. Brown or Green in color
b. 26” x 2”

15. Fresnel Magnifying Lens

a. 4x power
b. 3.25” x 2”

16. Waterproof Note Paper

a. 4 sheets
b. Desert tan color
c. 3.5” x 2”

17. Ink Pen

a. Pressurized ink cartridge
b. Black in color

18. Broad Spectrum Antibiotic Ointment

a. 1/32oz foil pack

19. Cotton Pad

a. 100% Cotton
b. 2” x 2.5”
c. Packaged in plastic with easy tear pre-cuts.

The contents of the soft storage case will include:

1. Hacksaw Blade

a. Carbon Steel
b. 24tpi
c. 2.75” L
d. Hole in one end for a lanyard
e. Opposite hole end, sharpen down reverse tanto-style end.

2. Ceramic Razor Blade

a. 1 or 2 sides sharpened
b. Packaged so as to not accidentally cut anything or dull

3. Moleskin Adhesive Patch

a. Heavy duty
b. 1.75” x 2.5”

4. Kevlar Thread

a. Green or yellow
b. 100-200lb test
c. 24” in length
d. Packaged in plastic with easy tear pre-cuts.

5. Fishing Leader/Downrigger Cable

a. Multi-strand
b. Stainless steel
c. 50lb test
d. 24” in length

6. Suspended Navigation Magnet

a. Identifiable north painting feature
b. Magnet suspended from thread/string
c. Packaged in plastic with easy tear pre-cuts.

7. Ferro Cerium Rod

a. 1.75” L x .125”W

8. Cotton Ball

a. Impregnated with wax.
b. Packaged in a reclosing bag.

9. Bobby Pins

a. Spring steel
b. 2 small
c. 1 large
d. Black in color

The final two items are worth singling out, because they highlight the optimism bred into every SEAL (and trump the safety and bobby pins):

10. Handcuff Shim (Pick)

11. Universal Handcuff Key

How to pack survival kits for stranded special-operations forces has been a subject the U.S. military has dealt with for at least the past half-century, according to this Army contracting guidance from back then:

An individual engaged in unconventional warfare and counter-guerrilla operations is frequently exposed to possible capture. In counter-guerrilla operations, indigenous elements with which a US soldier is working may be dispersed, causing complete separation of the soldier from the unit. While in an operational area, he must be continuously prepared to initiate evasive action and conceivably to continue evading for an extended period of time. His possession and proper use of a suitable survival kit may be the critical factor in effecting a successful juncture with friendly personnel. Therefore, there is a requirement for an individual aid and survival kit for issue to personnel participating in special warfare operations.

{Pic is from an Army proposal from a 1963 Army report on developing a survival kit for special warfare troops.}

As you read down its list of suggested contents, one thing is perfectly clear: the art of survival hasn’t changed that much in 50 years.

The first item listed is “a small, simple, all-weather fire-making device is desired” – “Matches, irrespective of type, are not desired.”

The Army also wanted these early kits to contain water-purification tablets, first-aid supplies, as well as a “capability for the user to kill, snare, or otherwise catch small game and fish.”

One other must-have: “a tool for cutting vines, palm fronds, or foliage for construction of shelter.”

Makes sense.

The document is dated April 17, 1963, just as the U.S. was heading into the Vietnam War.

http://nation.time.com/2013/02/21/youre-a-seal-stranded-in-hostile-territory-whats-in-your-survival-kit/#ixzz2LwT9PlNU

mark46th
02-25-2013, 14:48
You can get most of the items down at your local drugstore.

Pete
02-25-2013, 15:38
You could argue back and forth on the contents ........... but whatever they buy will cost far more than the individual items.

Just a fast look through the items and IIRC at least 1/3 of them were carried in my pockets, on my belt or stashed in my LBE.

Those big black safety pins that came with the cravats? Two in the Boonie Cap and one each under the two top pocket flaps.

P-38? Most multi tools have a can opener. My Swiss Army Knife worked well.

But an interesting dilemma. Are you Evading - or Surviving?

Evading and you could substitute half the stuff with some good high calorie power bars.

Razor
02-25-2013, 16:04
With the spec'd container dimensions, it's going to be tough to fit all that.

Richard
02-25-2013, 16:16
That container is $55.00!!! :eek:

We used to use these Band Aid cans - the newer ones were plastic - around $.70 w/bandaids - just empty them out, paint flat black or OD, and fill them with your survival items (without the redundancy on that list for the SEAL kits).

But our Band Aid can survival tins weren't engraveable like those cool $55 kits. :rolleyes:

Guess things have changed quite a bit...

Richard :munchin

medic&commo
02-25-2013, 16:18
Wonder if this was run by the operators:
1. So they validated minimum equipment needed
2. Try to utilize local purchase (as has been mentioned)
3. Anyone have prototype / rigged example (as Richard stated we did in the past)
m&c

The Reaper
02-25-2013, 17:48
With the spec'd container dimensions, it's going to be tough to fit all that.

Exactly.

Seems short on a few things to me as well, but what do I know compared to a aquarian mammal?

Best of luck!

TR

PSM
02-25-2013, 17:50
That container is $55.00!!! :eek:

We used to use these Band Aid cans - the newer ones were plastic - around $.70 w/bandaids - just empty them out, paint flat black or OD, and fill them with your survival items (without the redundancy on that list for the SEAL kits).

But our Band Aid can survival tins weren't engraveable like those cool $55 kits. :rolleyes:

Guess things have changed quite a bit...

Richard :munchin

Lose a lot of buttons did ya, Richard? :D

Pat

Richard
02-25-2013, 17:55
Lose a lot of buttons did ya, Richard? :D

Pat

Wampum to trade with the natives for food, shelter, and...companionship. Ever wonder where the phrase, "OK - let's get 'er buttoned up" came from? :rolleyes: :D

Richard :munchin

Brush Okie
02-25-2013, 18:47
Wonder if this is someting the SEAL teams asked for of if some admin in the higher chain of command has a relative that is going to make a bunch of cash off this deal. Band aid cans work but if you want to get real high tech use the small pelican cases that fit in a cargo pocket or can attach to your gear. They are water proof and plastic. Dont like the color for the next deployment? Buy a can of spray paint at wal mart.

http://www.pelican-case.com/pelican-protector-micro-case-series-i1030-yellow.html

MR2
02-25-2013, 19:22
Wampum to trade with the natives for food, shelter, and...companionship. Ever wonder where the phrase, "OK - let's get 'er buttoned up" came from? :rolleyes: :D

Richard :munchin

Zing! LOL

booker
02-26-2013, 06:46
Exactly.

Seems short on a few things to me as well, but what do I know compared to a aquarian mammal?

Best of luck!

TR

TR- Is this a potential thread in the making? I know more than one person on here would like to hear what your kit would have in it (me included).

MtnGoat
02-26-2013, 09:50
I run with an Altoids mints can with a lot of the same stuff, minus the pin flare set. The tin has 100 mile tape around it with 5-50 cord wrapped around it. Be working for me in A-stan since 05. I've always rolled with it in my upper right arm pocket with a combat medical gaze to pad the tin in the pocket.

It has a lot of good things. But you can get all of it within the supply system and do what TR and Pete said. Place it where you want the supplies to be on your body or kit. First level, Second Level, Third Level, ETC.

This article seems more like a PR plug for SOLKOA than anything else.

miclo18d
02-26-2013, 10:55
I run with an Altoids mints can with a lot of the same stuff, minus the pin flare set. The tin has 100 mile tape around it with 5-50 cord wrapped around it. Be working for me in A-stan since 05. I've always rolled with it in my upper right arm pocket with a combat medical gaze to pad the tin in the pocket.

It has a lot of good things. But you can get all of it within the supply system and do what TR and Pete said. Place it where you want the supplies to be on your body or kit. First level, Second Level, Third Level, ETC.

This article seems more like a PR plug for SOLKOA than anything else.

When I was in Ranger Batt we used to get a lot of M142 firing devices. We never really used the booby trap devices except to booby trap each others rooms but the cans made excellent survival containers. Basically a giant Altoids can.

(There were also coveted plastic versions that you could use as Copenhagen containers, they would hold like 2.5 cans of dip.)

Like MtnGoat said, seal it with tape, I liked electrical tape for that.




Another point would be: When was the last time we had a survival/E&E situation that warranted that much equipment, cost, and space? Marcus Luttrell? Scott O'Grady? "Gene" Hambleton?

I always had on my person: A trashbag (for water), a lighter (for fire), a knife, a piece of VS-17 panel, and an American Flag. I always had 550 cord and 100mph tape in my kit and ruck. SERE School taught you the rest that you needed to know.

Fish hooks? Not a lot of fish to be caught in the Helmand river and you can use a grenade for that, it's not even that loud! ;) The idea of Hooah Bars stashed around your pockets would get you a lot farther than fish hooks IMHO. Not to mention SERE taught you how to make fish hooks if you need them.

Antibiotics, iodine, and bouillon cubes I see the benefit in, but it has to be durable and then you need a "kit" to keep them safe. A kit reminds me of the Army's version of the "Blowout kit" for GSWs. The ones individual 18Ds made for their teams were small and would fit in your modified sleeve pockets. Then on my second tour to A-Stan they handed out the IFAK kits that took up a whole section of your IBA. I took out the Chitosan bandages and vacuum sealed them in with the sleeve kits so my guys wouldn't have to wear those ridiculous things!

plato
02-26-2013, 13:33
Like MtnGoat said, seal it with tape, I liked electrical tape for that.



Minor note.... since tape likes to peel back, gather lint and "lose it" after a while, I switched to wide rubber bands for a lot of "sealing situations". Just a thought.

Beef
02-26-2013, 15:33
We used Prince Albert cans. Wrapped a small AF signal mirror in a nylon pouch to the outside with half a dozen wraps of hundred-mile-an-hour tape. Inside, a button compass (tritium back then), one of the medical folding razor blades, pencil stub with eraser, couple of sheets of pocket note pad paper painted with that map waterproofing, BSA fire starter with short piece of hacksaw, some wax/cotton fire tinders. Black safety pins. A nitro glycerine tablet bottle (emptied rinsed and boiled) with 10-12 water purification tabs. Oh and a couple of feet of trip wire wrapped around the base of the can below the mirror.

Richard
02-26-2013, 15:55
Only the SEALs would spend money on waterproof paper...and then plan to use an ink pen instead of a pencil. :rolleyes:

Richard :munchin

mark46th
02-26-2013, 16:12
I haven't seen any mention of benzedrine or toilet paper.

MtnGoat
02-27-2013, 09:21
When I was in Ranger Batt we used to get a lot of M142 firing devices. We never really used the booby trap devices except to booby trap each others rooms but the cans made excellent survival containers. Basically a giant Altoids can.

(There were also coveted plastic versions that you could use as Copenhagen containers, they would hold like 2.5 cans of dip.)

Like MtnGoat said, seal it with tape, I liked electrical tape for that.




Another point would be: When was the last time we had a survival/E&E situation that warranted that much equipment, cost, and space? Marcus Luttrell? Scott O'Grady? "Gene" Hambleton?

I always had on my person: A trashbag (for water), a lighter (for fire), a knife, a piece of VS-17 panel, and an American Flag. I always had 550 cord and 100mph tape in my kit and ruck. SERE School taught you the rest that you needed to know.

Fish hooks? Not a lot of fish to be caught in the Helmand river and you can use a grenade for that, it's not even that loud! ;) The idea of Hooah Bars stashed around your pockets would get you a lot farther than fish hooks IMHO. Not to mention SERE taught you how to make fish hooks if you need them.

Antibiotics, iodine, and bouillon cubes I see the benefit in, but it has to be durable and then you need a "kit" to keep them safe. A kit reminds me of the Army's version of the "Blowout kit" for GSWs. The ones individual 18Ds made for their teams were small and would fit in your modified sleeve pockets. Then on my second tour to A-Stan they handed out the IFAK kits that took up a whole section of your IBA. I took out the Chitosan bandages and vacuum sealed them in with the sleeve kits so my guys wouldn't have to wear those ridiculous things!

I currently roll with multi level of dual-purpose items. I.E.: Trash bags and Zip-lock bags in my plate area for survival and SSE. Many different survival and medical items across my equipment/kit and body. I started this trip with carrying batteries for all of my "Toys" in my shoulder pocket in a mini zip-lock bag. With protein/energy bars and cliff Shot Energy gel packages in my bottom leg pockets.

I view survival/E&E items need to be on every level you wear. Not just in a pouch or rucksack/backpack flap. Just my .02

Basenshukai
02-27-2013, 19:11
For a SEAL Survival Kit I didn't see a booklet with the numbers and emails of any publicists, or book publishers.

Brush Okie
02-27-2013, 19:45
Minor note.... since tape likes to peel back, gather lint and "lose it" after a while, I switched to wide rubber bands for a lot of "sealing situations". Just a thought.

Cut off sections of bicycle inner tubes work very well. They can also be cut up and used as fire tender even in wet weather along with several other uses.

miclo18d
02-27-2013, 20:21
I currently roll with multi level of dual-purpose items. I.E.: Trash bags and Zip-lock bags in my plate area for survival and SSE. Many different survival and medical items across my equipment/kit and body. I started this trip with carrying batteries for all of my "Toys" in my shoulder pocket in a mini zip-lock bag. With protein/energy bars and cliff Shot Energy gel packages in my bottom leg pockets.

I view survival/E&E items need to be on every level you wear. Not just in a pouch or rucksack/backpack flap. Just my .02
Concur on all...multipurpose and several levels.

chance
02-27-2013, 21:48
For a SEAL Survival Kit I didn't see a booklet with the numbers and emails of any publicists, or book publishers.

I also noticed no hair products.:D

eggroll
06-07-2013, 04:02
Actually the containers are machined from 6061 aluminum billet and type III anodized.

The speced containers exist and are manufactured in Colorado Springs... ala the SUMA containers from SOLKOA Inc. I had a complete contingency kit in my work bag prior to it being stolen.

Unfortunately, the packing list was specific to devgru, but somehow that list found its way onto FedBizzOpps (in that quest to get it "Cheaper") and onward to TIME mag and this articles author wanted to hit on the Osama raid association and the publics love affair with any sealy