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View Full Version : Updated: "Project Delta-Tips of the Trade"...


MAB32
02-16-2013, 12:57
This seems to be a revamped modern day version of the old "Project Delta B52, Tips of the Trade". http://mountainguerrilla.wordpress.com/2013/02/09/tricks-of-the-trade-a-contemporary-look/


Any disagreements or even agreements in any areas with this authors opinions?:munchin

Dusty
02-16-2013, 13:18
This seems to be a revamped modern day version of the old "Project Delta B52, Tips of the Trade". http://mountainguerrilla.wordpress.com/2013/02/09/tricks-of-the-trade-a-contemporary-look/


Any disagreements or even agreements in any areas with this authors opinions?:munchin

Number 3. in the Firearms section seems irrelevant today.

MAB32
02-16-2013, 13:46
I have always wondered on the changing the round each morning to prevent a stuck casing was just a Vietnam problem and/or a CONUS one too? Also, the one about the selector-switch needing to be oiled and manipulated so that it too would not become stuck?

Peregrino
02-16-2013, 14:56
Nothing in there that will get somebody killed for doing it. Most of it is a quality synopsis of small unit, light infantry, patrolling that would make a decent pamphlet for modern irregular forces. I found it interesting enough that I looked at the rest of his site and am reasonably impressed.

A side observation, not germane to the present discussion - one of his articles includes a comment from the proverbial peanut gallery "Amateurs argue equipment. Experts and professionals argue tactics. IIRC the quote should be "amateurs argue tactics, professionals discuss logistics". On that vein, I think his blog would be more valuable to a wider audience if it were to give more space to a discussion of organizing and using the Underground and Auxiliary. Instructions for guerrillas (which appears to be his theme) is the easy part - and only 1/3 of the whole equation.

longrange1947
02-16-2013, 15:11
Nothing in there that will get somebody killed for doing it. Most of it is a quality synopsis of small unit, light infantry, patrolling that would make a decent pamphlet for modern irregular forces. I found it interesting enough that I looked at the rest of his site and am reasonably impressed.

A side observation, not germane to the present discussion - one of his articles includes a comment from the proverbial peanut gallery "Amateurs argue equipment. Experts and professionals argue tactics. IIRC the quote should be "amateurs argue tactics, professionals discuss logistics". On that vein, I think his blog would be more valuable to a wider audience if it were to give more space to a discussion of organizing and using the Underground and Auxiliary. Instructions for guerrillas (which appears to be his theme) is the easy part - and only 1/3 of the whole equation.

P you are correct, resources (Log) is a pet peeve of mine and something too many forget, until too late. I was just as guilty in my younger years, a great Tm Daddy showed me the error in my ways. :)

As he said, "the best tactics do not work if the resources are not there".
:munchin

Peregrino
02-16-2013, 15:48
Number 3. in the Firearms section seems irrelevant today.

Dusty - I wish this were true; however, with the number of people who either could not or would not afford it, there are a lot of CM barrels out there without a chrome (or anything else for that matter) lining and many of those same people are sitting on and using a horde of Wolf, Tula, etc. ammo that isn't the "preferred solution". Extend that to all of the surplus (WWII or earlier) firearms being snapped up by a desperate public and add in surplus ammo from "god knows where/what storage conditions" and a lot of neophyte "riflemen" need to relearn everything about weapons maintenance that our grandparents took for granted.

Dusty
02-16-2013, 16:06
Dusty - I wish this were true; however, with the number of people who either could not or would not afford it, there are a lot of CM barrels out there without a chrome (or anything else for that matter) lining and many of those same people are sitting on and using a horde of Wolf, Tula, etc. ammo that isn't the "preferred solution". Extend that to all of the surplus (WWII or earlier) firearms being snapped up by a desperate public and add in surplus ammo from "god knows where/what storage conditions" and a lot of neophyte "riflemen" need to relearn everything about weapons maintenance that our grandparents took for granted.

Good point.

It's funny, but I was taught to do it when I was in the 101st, and I still do it when I'm outside with my weapon overnight, to this day.

Another thing I do is replace the chambered round of my handgun a couple times a month and put it in a box with other formerly chambered rounds. It's been so long ago, I don't even remember when I took up the habit. I shoot them when I've got a box full.

TFA303
02-21-2013, 16:08
Another thing I do is replace the chambered round of my handgun a couple times a month and put it in a box with other formerly chambered rounds. It's been so long ago, I don't even remember when I took up the habit. I shoot them when I've got a box full.

I do that too. The box is next to my socks in my closet.

Team Sergeant
02-21-2013, 16:21
Good point.

It's funny, but I was taught to do it when I was in the 101st, and I still do it when I'm outside with my weapon overnight, to this day.

Another thing I do is replace the chambered round of my handgun a couple times a month and put it in a box with other formerly chambered rounds. It's been so long ago, I don't even remember when I took up the habit. I shoot them when I've got a box full.

Silly rabbit. I've had guns loaded for months and mags loaded for years. (Then again I live in Arizona, not really worried about moisture.) The only thing I ensure is that if the gun has left my person, I will press check it and make sure there's a round in there. I will also drop the mag and check it's loaded way past the "NYC 7" rounds.;)

Dusty
02-21-2013, 16:28
Silly rabbit. I've had guns loaded for months and mags loaded for years. (Then again I live in Arizona, not really worried about moisture.) The only thing I ensure is that if the gun has left my person, I will press check it and make sure there's a round in there. I will also drop the mag and check it's loaded way past the "NYC 7" rounds.;)

I don't recall a single misfire from any of them, as a matter of fact. Mr. Fudd. :D

Dozer523
02-21-2013, 20:19
My favorite part . . .
"(seriously, I started out carrying a Gerber MKII as a private at Regiment. Then I went to an . . . "

The Gerber MKII lesson EVERYONE has to learn.:D

TOMAHAWK9521
02-21-2013, 20:37
Dusty - I wish this were true; however, with the number of people who either could not or would not afford it, there are a lot of CM barrels out there without a chrome (or anything else for that matter) lining and many of those same people are sitting on and using a horde of Wolf, Tula, etc. ammo that isn't the "preferred solution". Extend that to all of the surplus (WWII or earlier) firearms being snapped up by a desperate public and add in surplus ammo from "god knows where/what storage conditions" and a lot of neophyte "riflemen" need to relearn everything about weapons maintenance that our grandparents took for granted.

P, you are so right on that issue. Case in point, we had some southern country boys hunting with us up in the mountains a couple years back. These guys supposedly had all kinds of huntin', fishin', n' trappin' experience under their collective belts, so I naturally assumed they were as proficient at maintaining their firearms as they were employing them. Boy did I overestimate them. We had heavy snow roll in on us for a few days and they got tired of sitting around camp and went out into the blizzard to find some elk. This should have been my first clue that they were not all that they claimed.

When they returned soaked and freezing several hours later I watched them toss their rifles onto the cots in their tent and then go about cleaning themselves up and settling down by the fire. I asked when they were going to wipe their weapons down and so forth. They looked at me like I was some kind of city boy freak. One of them complained that his bolt was acting sluggish and if I had any suggestions. I inspected his rifle to find that it may not have ever seen any kind of maintenance since he owned it. The others were as bad if not worse.

That evening I broke out my big maintenance box and gave them a class on weapons maintenance. They looked stunned as if I had just unveiled the mysteries of the universe to them. In all their years of shootin', no one had ever learned them about keeping one's weapons cleaned. One of the guys' dad was in camp with us and that 80-something old farmer ripped into his 50-something son for being a dumb-shit and forgetting everything that had been taught to him when he was a kid.

I still can't believe the condition of those rifles. The barrels were pitted inside and out and there was rust all over and inside the actions, bolts, etc. :eek:

Barbarian
02-22-2013, 12:27
One of them complained that his bolt was acting sluggish and if I had any suggestions.

lol. I'm guessing a few things came to mind.

Dusty
02-22-2013, 13:12
I still can't believe the condition of those rifles. The barrels were pitted inside and out and there was rust all over and inside the actions, bolts, etc. :eek:

I ran into a similar situation myself at deer camp about 4 years ago, except this guy's was so ill-maintained, the outside of the barrel, a -pump Rem '06, was pitted, but oily.

He brought in a nice, big five point, and he made a running shot at 150+ yards. He's left-handed naturally, but he had to shoot this deer from his right shoulder because of the way he was situated in his stand.

He let me handle the rifle, and the action was slick as snot and clean. As I watched him run a string and patch up the bore, I asked him how long he'd had the rifle, and he said he just bought it from one of his HVAC customers for 50 bucks, cleaned it up, scoped it and zeroed it.

How the working parts of that gun escaped disaster is beyond me.