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Leozinho
12-29-2012, 17:33
This is intended for the knifemakers here.

How do ya'll sharpen the custom knives that leave your shop?

I know some hobbyists that some swear by using waterstones and oil stones, and I'm sure ya'll have the skills to sharpen freehand.

But at the same time you also have access to 2x72 grinders with contact wheels, paper/felt wheels, or other tools that could either save time or give a different edge.

What angle(s) do you use on your tactical knives?

Do you prefer a hollow, convex or flat grind?

Many thanks.

alelks
12-29-2012, 18:00
This is a very informative thread: Click Me (http://professionalsoldiers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=759&highlight=sharpening)

x SF med
12-30-2012, 09:20
This is a very informative thread: Click Me (http://professionalsoldiers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=759&highlight=sharpening)

Al... there may not be anything helpful in that thread:rolleyes: it is about sharpening/honing knife blades...:munchin...

Leozinho
12-30-2012, 20:03
This is a very informative thread: Click Me (http://professionalsoldiers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=759&highlight=sharpening)

Thanks for that.

It looks like Mr. Harsey finishes on a Norton India fine stone (about 320 grit) and doesn't care for stropping or otherwise producing the super-sharp polished edges, as they don't hold up well.

Interesting. Some folks make a big deal of scary sharp blades that will whittle hair. Good to know that isn't necessary and may be counterproductive.

Good stuff.

BrianH
01-01-2013, 12:06
Thanks for that.

It looks like Mr. Harsey finishes on a Norton India fine stone (about 320 grit) and doesn't care for stropping or otherwise producing the super-sharp polished edges, as they don't hold up well.

Interesting. Some folks make a big deal of scary sharp blades that will whittle hair. Good to know that isn't necessary and may be counterproductive.

Good stuff.
The knives that I've sharpened after being taught by Mr. Harsey and Chris Reeve hold an edge very, very well and will still "whittle hair." Stropping is best left for straight razors and race axes :)

Bill Harsey
01-05-2013, 10:04
Thanks for that.

It looks like Mr. Harsey finishes on a Norton India fine stone (about 320 grit) and doesn't care for stropping or otherwise producing the super-sharp polished edges, as they don't hold up well.

Interesting. Some folks make a big deal of scary sharp blades that will whittle hair. Good to know that isn't necessary and may be counterproductive.

Good stuff.

Leozinho,
You asked a good question because knifemakers face one thing that most will never see which is a blade that has not been edged before.

When we have knives to sharpen in large batches the volume of steel to be removed to establish the cutting bevel would be difficult to do by hand stoning.
The craft of "edging" is a critical one to the usefulness of the blade and this goes double for using the belt grinder to do it.

I do strop my blades on leather with green chrome oxide buffing compound rubbed in to the leather surface but can make them cut very well without this step.

There really is such a thing as too fine an edge for best possible knife edge endurance in the field.

On angles, Most of us get a feel for how acute an angle we can put on the edge of a given knife. This angle is partially controlled by the cross sectional geometry of the entire blade.

I have never once in my work measured the angle of my sharpening bevels on any knife. Even if I called out an angle how is anyone going to be able to measure or duplicate it in the field?

Professional competition axes are another thing. I have built angle gauges out of bronze to measure the angles of axe edges for some of the guys you watch on ESPN Timber Sports. My axe has an included angle of 11 degrees and can take a shaving off the surface of newspaper without going through the other side.

The axe in pic is mine, all edge work was done by hand stoning. This is a 7 lb. racing axe.

If memory serves the sharpening thread was about field sharpening which means using the few tools one would have in the "field".

x SF med
01-05-2013, 14:20
Mr. Bill,

Glad to see that axe survived the tree incident at the shop, I will covet that axe forever.

Oh, thanks for all of the guidance you have given me in the mechanics and art of sharpening.

pcfixer
02-19-2013, 13:08
I've been using a Arkansas stone of two different grits. One is fine and the other course and since I've had this stone for almost 20 years I don't remember the grit number.
Is there a good reason to use the Norton stones?

Kenny

Barbarian
02-19-2013, 15:44
I've been using a Arkansas stone of two different grits. One is fine and the other course and since I've had this stone for almost 20 years I don't remember the grit number.
Is there a good reason to use the Norton stones?

Kenny-

Norton makes very high quality stones. Some are specialized for specific purposes.

The answer to your question, really depends on what you expect from sharpening stones and your satisfaction with your current setup. HTH.

Dusty
02-19-2013, 16:18
I've been using a Arkansas stone of two different grits. One is fine and the other course and since I've had this stone for almost 20 years I don't remember the grit number.
Is there a good reason to use the Norton stones?

Kenny

That's all I've ever used. Are your blades sharp? :munchin

DJ Urbanovsky
02-20-2013, 10:53
How do ya'll sharpen the custom knives that leave your shop?


I do everything on the grinder. Single speed 2x72 Wilton Square Wheel. I set the edge bevels with 120 grit. I feel that 120 gives just the right amount of "tooth" for a good user edge. Then it's over the the bench grinder to polish. Usually three or four passes per side on the buff is all it takes. I use a solid felt buff, usually soft, although medium works well also. Buff gets loaded with emery compound. I do not like stitched or loose buffs because threads work their way loose and then can end up whacking this annoying cross hatch pattern up on the bevels and flats. Once I've polished the edge, I take and set the edge nearest the handle in the corner of a 2x4, apply pressure, and then pull the blade through that cut all the way to the tip. I do that two or three times. Then I'll check the edge by touch, do the fingernail test, shave some hair off my hand/arm, then cut some paper and shave some packing peanuts.


What angle(s) do you use on your tactical knives?


Depends on what is best for the blade and the user. Could be anywhere from 20-45. More obtuse obviously being better suited for hard use. You get a feel for it once you've done it a bunch. I don't use any gauges or guides or jigs or anything like that for sharpening, it's all freehand.


Do you prefer a hollow, convex or flat grind?


I like, carry, and use all three. That said, my customs are hollow chisel, and my mid-techs are flat V.

alelks
02-20-2013, 11:58
You're suppose to sharpen them? :D

Dusty
02-20-2013, 13:40
You're suppose to sharpen them? :D

If they're Barbarian-made, not very often. :cool:

pcfixer
02-21-2013, 07:51
Kenny-

Norton makes very high quality stones. Some are specialized for specific purposes.

The answer to your question, really depends on what you expect from sharpening stones and your satisfaction with your current setup. HTH.

Reason for asking is I'm sure I could expect a sharper knife. It's likely the stone I've been useing is worn, I keep the stone clean with oil and paper towel .


That's all I've ever used. Are your blades sharp? :munchin

After reading here, I'd say my blades are sharp. Maybe time to re school myself on method and stone.

I have a variety of blades. Army M-9, a drawerfull of collectable damascus knifes (Parker-Edwards), some pocket knifes for carrying and
a nice Hibben Rambo III. Would be nice to have a new stone and sharper knifes!!

Barbarian
02-21-2013, 09:59
Reason for asking is I'm sure I could expect a sharper knife. It's likely the stone I've been useing is worn, I keep the stone clean with oil and paper towel .

Stones do wear out eventually. Some kinds quicker than others. How worn a stone is doesn't generally affect how sharp you can get a knife, (unless the stone is worn concave). It does effect the amount of time it takes to sharpen a knife, though.

Would be nice to have a new stone and sharper knifes!!

There are different kinds of sharp. If you haven't yet, give Bill's thread, "field sharpening," a good thorough read. Great info there.

pcfixer
02-21-2013, 13:56
http://www.hallsproedge.com/bench2.php

Found information on my stone on this site. I have the soft/hard stone 1" thick
combo and I so use the sharpening instructions found on this site, they are similar to what is on the paper in the box. The instructions where under the stone in a small wood box, it's been a long time since I purchased this, maybe 20 years.

x SF med
02-24-2013, 11:03
You're suppose to sharpen them? :D

Keep them honed, and it's not often you have to do a full sharpening. :cool:

recutting an edge after reshaping (by hand) due to improper use... I'm not going to mention names, Crip, but you know who you are... is difficult, since you have to match the original angles, and then hone the edge... no grinders, just stones and diamond steels when I fix blade tips.

Honing/ normal sharpening -Norton 2 sided 10" stone and a bench strop with green polishing compound. Recutting - CRKT diamond wedge, EZ-lap 8" diamond, DMT folding diamond (blue/red), Norton stone and bench strop.... occasionally, triangular files, mill bastards and emery boards/paper... depends on the steel and the geometry. Quick field honing... Lansky or Smith's triangular ceramic sticks...