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kgoerz
03-01-2012, 20:54
I already dropped Cable. I Just use NetFlix, VUDU...etc. I connected my computer up to the TV using HDTV push to TV wireless. I also get all the networks with the HD antenna.
What I'm looking for? A web sight that lets you watch TV for free. Nothing pirated. Just something to give me more options. Everything I goggle seems to be bullshit or gimmicks.
If your paying for INTERNET and cable. Your wasting your money.

Sigaba
03-01-2012, 21:07
QP kgoerz--

You could go to the websites of the various services (networks) to watch recently aired episodes. For example, ABC has http://abc.go.com/watch.

Hulu also features recent episodes of television shows.

Also, your cable/internet provider may have options for you to stream programs from certain services (such as ESPN).

I recommend that one read very carefully the fine print of one's service agreement while wearing a tin-foil hat. Double check and to make sure how much one can download/stream in a billing cycle--even if one has been told that there are no limits.

Snaquebite
03-01-2012, 21:13
Everything I goggle seems to be bullshit or gimmicks.


It's because you're "goggling"....sorry had to do it.....

theis223
03-02-2012, 00:06
QP Kogers-

The history channel lets you watch currently aired shows on their web site from the past season or so. The bastards still throw the occational comercial in but its not too bad. Beats the hell out of clips from youtube.

Just my .02 cents

NoRoadtrippin
03-02-2012, 00:25
Have you overlooked Hulu.com? It's a great compliment to Netflix. Hulu will have current seasons of shows whereas Netflix only gets the past one(s) and what not. Content varies by provider, but its the only other site I use in the same way I use Netflix. We had the premium Hulu+ subscription for a bit, but I decided the last thing I needed was to watch more shows just because I was paying $7 a month to get them so I cut it off. Its free online...we were paying to get it on the Xbox. If you've already pushed a PC to your TV then you don't have a need for the + part of the service.

CloseDanger
03-02-2012, 14:29
Here is one for ya - it's WWTV (http://wwitv.com/portal.htm). There is plenty out there.

kgoerz
03-02-2012, 18:28
I use HULU/NetFlix/VUDU/EPIX
VUDU seems to have the latest and greatest. Anyone else using anything different for streaming, keep it legal. Everyone already knows where to go for pirated stuff.

Streck-Fu
03-02-2012, 19:23
Hulu seems to have only a few episodes of more recent sows with tons of partial clips. And commercials. I looked at hulu plus and can't find much that I'd watch that isn't already on Netflix.

kgoerz
03-02-2012, 19:59
I think HULU plus is for a gaming console, charge extra to watch thru a console. Once they centralize all this streaming. Cable will be gone. Right now it's spread all over the place. VIOS is already doing it in the northeast.

NoRoadtrippin
03-03-2012, 03:32
Hulu seems to have only a few episodes of more recent sows with tons of partial clips. And commercials. I looked at hulu plus and can't find much that I'd watch that isn't already on Netflix.

Yep. This is why we cancelled it. What it does have over Netflix is the current seasons of the shows that it does carry. Netflix will always be at least one season out of date based on their current model. If Hulu has any given show then they usually have something like the last 5 episodes of the current season. If the shows you watch are carried by them then its effectively an internet based DVR you don't have to remember to set.

CloseDanger
03-03-2012, 15:37
Remember also -Rabbit Ears (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_14?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=usb+television+tuner&sprefix=USB+television%2Caps%2C260)

The Reaper
03-03-2012, 15:49
Remember also -Rabbit Ears (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_14?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=usb+television+tuner&sprefix=USB+television%2Caps%2C260)

No lie.

I added a digital antenna and was shocked at the number and quality of OTA channels available from a large area.

And when cable is out, we still have something to watch.

TR

Streck-Fu
03-03-2012, 17:31
I think HULU plus is for a gaming console, charge extra to watch thru a console. Once they centralize all this streaming. Cable will be gone. Right now it's spread all over the place. VIOS is already doing it in the northeast.

Hulu Plus is a paid access to more content. You can use a computer to access it. It does not require a console though the consoles can only access hulu plus rather than the free hulu.

Our Sony BluRay player has it along with Netflix, Vudu, and a dozen other services.

Streck-Fu
03-03-2012, 17:32
No lie.

I added a digital antenna and was shocked at the number and quality of OTA channels available from a large area.

And when cable is out, we still have something to watch.

TR

We have that as a back up. It is a nice option.

Sigaba
03-03-2012, 17:55
Once they centralize all this streaming. Cable will be gone. Right now it's spread all over the place. VIOS is already doing it in the northeast.MOO, based upon my experience working in the cable industry, the "lean back" experience of cable will continue to command a large market share of end users (subscribers) who don't care to bring the "lean forward" sensibilities of the personal computer to their home entertainment experience. While some might argue that "digital convergence" will turn the tide in favor of computers/tablets/mobile devices, I think many Americans will continue to prefer the simpler solution even though it may not be the best solution. (Another stumbling block remains the fact that Microsoft and Google don't yet "get it" when it comes to the "lean forward"/"lean back" paradigm.)

Also, cable giants like COMCAST will continue to leverage ownership of product and product distribution rights for as long as possible. The industry will also try to stave off as long as possible "a la carte" subscriptions to services.

My $0.02.

Streck-Fu
03-03-2012, 18:22
Part of the problems with improving streaming content is that the productions studios are slow to adopt online friendly models for dealing with rights and royalties.
They prefer the traditional outlets like cable providers of channels like HBO because they can pay more upfront for content.

If I remember correctly, Hulu lost a large number of TV shows recently because of cost.

I still have cable because my wife likes certain shows and surfing in the evenings. I'm more content driven and am fine only paying for what I use.

Plus Comcast bundling has priced services such that it costs less to sign up everything than to select services. I pay $130 for ISP/Phone/TV. If I had ISP only, it's $70, Cable/ISP only is $150 without HBO and other add ons.....:rolleyes:

kgoerz
03-03-2012, 20:30
No lie.

I added a digital antenna and was shocked at the number and quality of OTA channels available from a large area.

And when cable is out, we still have something to watch.

TR

I'm getting around seven in HD. I'm in a Apartment. Outdoor antenna on a house has to pick up a few.

BOfH
03-04-2012, 12:44
MOO, based upon my experience working in the cable industry, the "lean back" experience of cable will continue to command a large market share of end users (subscribers) who don't care to bring the "lean forward" sensibilities of the personal computer to their home entertainment experience. While some might argue that "digital convergence" will turn the tide in favor of computers/tablets/mobile devices, I think many Americans will continue to prefer the simpler solution even though it may not be the best solution. (Another stumbling block remains the fact that Microsoft and Google don't yet "get it" when it comes to the "lean forward"/"lean back" paradigm.)

Also, cable giants like COMCAST will continue to leverage ownership of product and product distribution rights for as long as possible. The industry will also try to stave off as long as possible "a la carte" subscriptions to services.

My $0.02.

Indeed, SOPA/PIPA are/were fine examples of protecting a business model that is rapidly moving towards obsolescence. Then again, new business models cost time, money and a general "trimming of the fat", so that fight is going to be long and drawn out. /End Rant :(

On the topic, we primarily use Netflix and Hulu, the benefit of both is that my wife and I are able to screen/limit what my daughter watches...

My .002