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MAB32
01-27-2012, 20:12
I had a correction of the Aorta (Coarctation) a few years back. They opened the coarc and checked my three branches in the heart. Doc said he never saw a guy who had some partially clogged at my age. Nothing found in mine. All good to go. They told me that a part of the mesh or something that was contained in there off was to be brought down to my left leg and left there. Anybody know what I am talking about? I hope so because within the last two weeks my artery in my left leg between the knee and the groin area has started to hurt for some unknown reason and I think it is because of that procedure. Should I be worried about this pain?

It comes and goes and never lasts more than an hour or so. On a scale of 1 - 10, I would give the pain a 5 when it occurs. I need some opinions here Doc's.
:(

Mark

wook
01-28-2012, 00:12
I would discuss this with the doc who did the procedure. There are at least several things that I can think of that could potentially problematic. Give the doc that did the procedure or a specialist in the same field a call and inquire with them. Wish I could give you more advice, but the type of procedure you're talking about is not my specialty.


Thanks.



Wook

PedOncoDoc
01-28-2012, 05:45
They opened the coarc and checked my three branches in the heart. Doc said he never saw a guy who had some partially clogged at my age. Nothing found in mine. All good to go. They told me that a part of the mesh or something that was contained in there off was to be brought down to my left leg and left there. Anybody know what I am talking about?

Your writing in the above makes it hard to follow what you're saying. Could you please rewrite this more clearly?

I hope so because within the last two weeks my artery in my left leg between the knee and the groin area has started to hurt for some unknown reason and I think it is because of that procedure. Should I be worried about this pain?

It comes and goes and never lasts more than an hour or so. On a scale of 1 - 10, I would give the pain a 5 when it occurs. I need some opinions here Doc's.


I wouldn't be so confident that the pain is an artery (or vascular), or that it is directly related to the surgery. What brings about the pain? Certain leg movements? Standing? Nothing obvious?

Pain is your body telling you that it isn't liking something. I suggest you start with a call/visit to your primary care provider and/or the surgeon who did the coarc repair and move on from there.

HTH...

MAB32
01-28-2012, 12:33
What I was trying to say was that while I waodys having the procedure done for the Coarctation I ask them to check my heart for any blockages. He found none. He expected to find something at my age but didn't. I was happy with that news.

Now when the opened the coarctation the had to leave something behind inside my body and they moved it to my left thigh to where it do no harm to the body. They showed me were they placed inside the thigh.

Well, now within the last couple of weeks that area is really starting to bother me. The pain feels like a sharp prick and then it becomes really painful when I sit down for a longer time, say an hour or more. Getting up or even working out plays no significate relief either. I was wondering that what ever they had to leave behind inside the body and inside the left artery might be now bothering that portion of the artery. For example, it may have ended up perpendicular to the artery causing the pain, maybe or something like that?

The The Doctor who did it was a pediatrition because it is a childhood disease. I will have my regular Doctor to see what might be doing it. I see him on Februrary 13th.

I also do not seem to have any other problems associated with this problem. No swelling or warmness around the area. No swelling in the feet, etc., etc. By the way I describe it, coulkd this be more serious than first though by me?

PedOncoDoc
01-28-2012, 12:40
I would suggest contacting the surgeon who performed the procedure to address the issue.

Eagle5US
01-28-2012, 20:28
I would suggest contacting the surgeon who performed the procedure to address the issue.

I HEARTILY second this.

What you are writing indicates that you do not fully understand what was done. As such, what you are relaying here does not make make "medical sense."

Kind of like us asking a pilot a question and saying that "when we push in the clutch the plane turns left"

Good luck.

MAB32
01-29-2012, 00:28
OK,

When they placed the mesh expander into the proper area of the coarc they had it in a sheath so it wouldn't open up anywhere except where the wanted it to. They reached the coarc and the expanding mesh was released. It expanded perfectly and where they wanted to do so. Coarc fixed!

Then they pulled the sheath back through the arteries and redirected it to be deposited on the inside of my left inner thigh artery which is where they left it on purpuse and where it would do know harm to me to have it there. This was according to them.

Since "Coarc" is a known childhood disease I had to get mine done again back in 2003 in Akron Childrens hospital (ACH).

Is it getting clearer than mud yet?

I do plane to call the Doctor that fixes them now in Childrens when they are just babies. Geez, I was first or second in the world to have it done here in Childrens in the summer of 1970. My name should show up in periodicals, well, at least I was told it was. Besides, I always use to get the "So your M--- -----, I or we have heard about you before! Maybe one of you have access to medical procedures that made medical history or something of the sort?

PedOncoDoc
01-29-2012, 05:05
Then they pulled the sheath back through the arteries and redirected it to be deposited on the inside of my left inner thigh artery which is where they left it on purpuse and where it would do know harm to me to have it there. This was according to them.

You keep referencing "them" - we keep suggesting contacting "them" since "they" did the procedure, are familiar with this procedure, and will be more familiar with potential complications both soon and long after the procedure. To me it does not make since to leave a sheath or other nonfunctional item in the body, but I have no frame of reference for this procedure and why this would potentially be done, hence my deferment (as well as other medical professionals on this forum) to the person who performed the procedure.

Yes, adult cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons do not manage congenital heart conditions. I remember caring for 60 year olds as a pediatric resident, after catheterization to monitor/assess abnormal heart valves that were present since birth. The fact that this procedure was done by a pediatric sepcialist does not mean you shouldn't contact them.

Since "Coarc" is a known childhood disease I had to get mine done again back in 2003 in Akron Childrens hospital (ACH)....

...I was first or second in the world to have it done here in Childrens in the summer of 1970.

These statements seem to contradict each other - did you have this procedure in 2003 or 1970? Or was the procedure in 2003 a revision of the original procedure? You're ability to clearly and succintly describe your issue is lacking.

My name should show up in periodicals, well, at least I was told it was. Besides, I always use to get the "So your M--- -----, I or we have heard about you before!

I don't know how this is pertinent to your current problems. I never aspired to be a case report in the medical literature. ;)

Maybe one of you have access to medical procedures that made medical history or something of the sort?

Having access to medical journals does not make us pediatric heart surgeons. The only cardiac medical procedures to make history that I paid attention to were the ones names after the pediatric congenital heart surgeon that I rounded with during my pediatric residency because he liked to give us impromptu quizzes on his procedure (we got PIMPed hard on that rotation).

Speaking as a subspecialist physician, we tend not to read journals outside of the scope of our practice (read: focused on another subspeciality), unless we have a patient with a specific issue about which we want to learn more. Even then, we typically call a colleague who is a subspecialist in that area who is familial with the current practice and relevent/recent literature who can put our patient's issue in context and help manage the problems that fall within his area of expertise.


In summary: Several medical professionals here have suggested you contact the surgeon. No matter how much more information you post in this thread - clearly stated or otherwise - it is highly unlikely (nearing 0% probability) that our recommendations are going to change. If our recommendation is not satisfactory to you, perhaps you should seek out a congenital heart disease medical forum with vetted congenital heart defect surgeons to continue this discussion.

MAB32
01-29-2012, 20:40
Since I cannot get my point across as to what has happened and to what was to be left in my body, I am going to make an appointment sometime within the next few weeks. If not sooner. I have got both of your reccomendations, and so it will be done by myself. Sorry for confusing the crap out of every body here and ending up confusing myself in the end too. Thanks Doc's. Does any one of you want to know what is going to happen or did happen after my visit?

Red Flag 1
01-29-2012, 21:10
Since I cannot get my point across as to what has happened and to what was to be left in my body, I am going to make an appointment sometime within the next few weeks. If not sooner. I have got both of your reccomendations, and so it will be done by myself. Sorry for confusing the crap out of every body here and ending up confusing myself in the end too. Thanks Doc's. Does any one of you want to know what is going to happen or did happen after my visit?

Sorry to learn you are having some problems, deputy. What you describe is a bit difficult to follow, but such is the expense of not being to see you, and going solely on the written word. The standard, and wisest, answer is to refer you to your doc(s). He/they/them know you, or will have access to your important medical history. It would be an almost magical event if one of us here would be able to ID you from a medical journal entry, 42 or even nine years ago. Even with that magical hit, the answer would be the same you have heard from Eagle5, and my friend PedOncoDoc.

Yes we would like some follow up after your visit with your doc:lifter. Hope all turns out well for you.

RF 1

MAB32
01-30-2012, 01:12
Thanks RF1. I will do just that. Again thanks guys.