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S. B. Newman
01-12-2012, 06:14
I had the opportunity to interview Actor/Director/Screen Writer/Author - Dale Dye. You all should remember him from his roles in the movies "Saving Private Ryan" and "Band of Brothers." http://thenighteaglessoared.blogspot.com/

The ariticle is on my personal blog so you'll have to scroll down past the books TV commerical to find it.

Hope you enjoy it.

Steve

f50lrrp
01-12-2012, 12:03
:D I met Mr Dye in 1987, when I was the coordinator of an FBI counter sniper Seminar featuring USMC Gunnery Sergeant Carlos Hathcock (93 Kills). This was at Fort Ord and the FBI Invited Dye, John Millius and several other "Hollywood types" to attend. m

The seminar was sponsored by Monterey Peninsula College and offered to California Peace Officers through POST (for a $150 fee) and to the military (free of charge).

On the 1st night there was a hosted dinner at Carmel Valley's Quail Lodge (5 Star) Hathcock, Millius, Dye, Jim Hill (owner of the El Sur Ranch), Ed Haber (owner of the Quail Lodge), Paul Keene (DA's Investigator), The four FBI Agents and I Attended. During the dinner, Keene asked Hathcock if he wanted to meet Clint Eastwood, whom Keene had taught to shoot for his "Dirty Harry" Movies.

Hathcock asked why he would should meet Eastwood and Paul told him that Eastwood had just played a Marine Gunnery Sergeant in a Movie! Gunny Hatcock replied that Eastwood needed to ask to meet him because he was the freal deal!

Utah Bob
01-12-2012, 15:19
:D I met Mr Dye in 1987, when I was the coordinator of an FBI counter sniper Seminar featuring USMC Gunnery Sergeant Carlos Hathcock (93 Kills). This was at Fort Ord and the FBI Invited Dye, John Millius and several other "Hollywood types" to attend. m

The seminar was sponsored by Monterey Peninsula College and offered to California Peace Officers through POST (for a $150 fee) and to the military (free of charge).

On the 1st night there was a hosted dinner at Carmel Valley's Quail Lodge (5 Star) Hathcock, Millius, Dye, Jim Hill (owner of the El Sur Ranch), Ed Haber (owner of the Quail Lodge), Paul Keene (DA's Investigator), The four FBI Agents and I Attended. During the dinner, Keene asked Hathcock if he wanted to meet Clint Eastwood, whom Keene had taught to shoot for his "Dirty Harry" Movies.

Hathcock asked why he would should meet Eastwood and Paul told him that Eastwood had just played a Marine Gunnery Sergeant in a Movie! Gunny Hatcock replied that Eastwood needed to ask to meet him because he was the freal deal!

That's for sure.:D

craigepo
01-12-2012, 17:45
Thanks for the post. I didn't know Dye was a Missouri boy. I thought that accent sounded familiar.

PSM
01-12-2012, 17:52
He had a weekend talk show on KFI, Los Angeles, for several years.

Pat

akv
01-12-2012, 18:41
I like his work, especially in "Platoon" as the CO who orders an air strike on his overrun position. I'm sure that happened for real more than once, it led me to read about Lt. General Bill Carpenter, then a Captain at Dak To.

S. B. Newman
01-13-2012, 08:13
Thanks for the comments everybody! It was a real honor for me to have this opportunity. Obviously Dale didn't have to grant me an interview but I think in his heart of hearts he is still one of us...a regurlar Joe, somebody who is a huge fan of the military and veterans like him. I'm not sure if he is a member of this site. What do you think should I invite him to join? Sending him the link to this thread in a few minutes. If he decides to sign up we will all be honored I'm sure.

Again thanks for all the comments and thanks for stopping by the blog to see the interview. If you haven't seen it yet...go to the link I posted in the first thread. :D

Steve

Hognose
01-14-2012, 18:32
I think I lost an opportunity once, thanks to Dale Dye. I mentioned him to the assistant director of a movie that was filming in Boston. They wanted a local New England guy to provide some military advice to actors and extras for one scene, and the guy recommended to them couldn't do it -- he was deployed. He recommended me.

Everything was going well until I mentioned that the master of the kind of thing they wanted to do was Dale Dye. Very sharp question: "Oh, do you know Dale Dye?" I had to confess that I didn't know him face to face, we had exchanged paper letters when I was on active duty and he was writing and I was looking for writing and publication advice. And we exchanged a couple of letters, for which I remain very grateful. He was encouraging, and I'd always followed his work and respected him.

I do not know why, but instantly the tenor of the interview changed and it wrapped up very quickly. The assistant director, a very hard-working, personally neurotic guy led me out past the (famous) director, and didn't introduce me. I was surprised that two weeks later he called to tell me I didn't get the job, sorry, and he'd look forward at some other time. (I was surprised because I knew I hadn't gotten the job -- it was glaringly obvious). Thing is, his voice on the phone was the voice of a terrified man. He was very apologetic about not hiring me, and I wound up reassuring him it was perfectly OK, I wasn't desperate for work when I walked in the production office and I wasn't desperate when I walked out, I was doing a favor for another QP, but i knew from not meeting the director that I didn't get the gig.

I'm not particularly scary and I'm pretty low-key. I don't "look like an SF guy" as Hollywood people imagine them. All I can think is that the AD had a hard-on for Capt. Dye for some reason and I hosed myself by mentioning him. As far as the neuroticism is concerned, maybe he's used to angry displays from disappointed actors or something. For most of us, a bad day at the office has (or once had) a completely different meaning, and yet they think we're keyed up.

I've also been told that the opportunity I blew was a very rare one, because movie industry people far prefer guys with lots of movie industry experience, and there are plenty of them. And that a lot of their advisors, experts, armorers and what have you have thin or fabricated military backgrounds. (There was one guy who was an SGM in 19th Group out there who told a lot of Vietnam tall tales. He'd actually been injured in pre-mission training and never did a combat mission, poor guy; and then he came back to the Winter Soldier thing and was the SF guy with all the stories of torture and barbarism. He was a Hollywood military advisor guy. No wonder there's Rambo movies).

I was impressed at how hard the behind the scenes people work. They have some serious work habits -- wasn't expecting that, glad to see it actually. I don't see many movies because I like war movies and for 35 or 40 years all they've done is abuse the troops. I get old movies and foreign war movies on DVD... the foreign ones are starting to pick up the nihilism of Hollywood though.

Funny thing is, I never did see the movie, so I have no idea who they hired. I suppose there's some way to look it up.

Razor
01-20-2012, 10:26
Funny thing is, I never did see the movie, so I have no idea who they hired. I suppose there's some way to look it up.

imdb.com

Hognose
01-22-2012, 13:01
Thanks, I should have thought of that. I looked at IMDB and googled a bit and I'm more puzzled than ever was.

There is a guy online whose resume claims he was "military advisor" on the film in question, but the IMDB credits him only with working in the "ADR loop group" and uncredited at that. As I understand it, that's a sound dub thing. He's based in LA and his military advisor credits include "Men who stare at goats." ("Things I'd leave off my resume for five hundred, Alex!")

Of course, he could have done some stuff for post production on the military scenes in the movie. Or IMDB could be in error, or whatever... I'm sure Hollywood is not above admin mistakes.

Anyway, that was my brush with Hollywood. Always wanted to be a star, but I had a face for radio and a voice for silent films.

S. B. Newman
01-24-2012, 17:14
It can be a tough business, not for the faint of heart. Sort of like a few other businesses we've been involved in. You either keep going until you make it or you quit.

If it is your dream Hognose, you should pursue it. Not all actors or professionals in the entertainment industry are extraordinarily good looking or even talented. They just stuck with it until they got a shot. When I started writing, I recieved some good advice. It was, “pursue your dream but don’t quit your day job just yet.”

Best of luck!

ian0341fo
02-20-2012, 11:41
I met Dale Dye after one of our training events for the 31st MEU in 2010. He fought with Hotel 2/5 during Hue, and wanted to come out for our warriors night after a long week of urban training. Needless to say, an entire company of Marines got shitfaced and talked his ear off all night. It was great of him to come out.

Richard
02-20-2012, 13:53
Anybody ever ask him why he sports the RVN Parachutist Badge?

I'm sure there's a good reason for it, but I'm just mildly curious...:confused:

Richard :munchin

Brush Okie
02-20-2012, 15:10
I met Dale Dye after one of our training events for the 31st MEU in 2010. He fought with Hotel 2/5 during Hue, and wanted to come out for our warriors night after a long week of urban training. Needless to say, an entire company of Marines got shitfaced and talked his ear off all night. It was great of him to come out.

I have an uncle that was with the 2/5 at Hue. I wonder if they knew each other back then.

akv
02-20-2012, 15:57
Anybody ever ask him why he sports the RVN Parachutist Badge? I'm sure there's a good reason for it, but I'm just mildly curious...

Richard FWIW, The below bio is from his website, hope this helps?

Captain Dale A. Dye, USMC (Ret)

My military careers features a number of unconventional highlights that I have been able to draw on and use in film work. Most of these extraordinary tours or attachments grew out of my assignment as a Combat Correspondent with the United States Marine Corps. Under the guise of observing first-hand and then compiling official reports or writing feature stories, I was allowed to become involved in a very broad range of experiences. Here are some of those experiences in a rough chronological order.

INDIRECT FIRE-SUPPORT: Served as an 81mm and 60mm mortar crewman, forward observer and fire-direction center NCO.

DRILL INSTRUCTOR/TROOP HANDLER: MCRD Parris Island and Infantry Training Regiment, MCB Camp Pendleton.

MARINE COMBAT CORRESPONDENT: Vietnam 1967-68 and 1969-1970. Served primarily with 1st Marine Division and then with III MAF. Units where I kept a permanent home and served as an extra rifle NCO, Co. H, 2nd Bn., 5th Marines, Co. D, 1st Bn., 5th Marines, Co. E, 2nd Bn., 3rd Marines and Co. F, 2nd Bn., 1st Marines.

ARMORED CAVALRY ADVISOR: With ARVN 4th Armored Cavalry Regiment in Quang Ngai Province.

KOREAN MARINES: Served with 2nd Korean Marine Brigade (Blue Dragon) in southern Quang Nam Province.

ARVN AIRBORNE BRIGADE: Parachute training with Army of Republic of Vietnam Airborne Forces.

PENTAGON DUTY: Member of Secretary of Defense Staff.

PHILIPPINE MARINES: Served with Philippine Marines during my time with 1st Marine Brigade in Hawaii. Also graduated from Philippine Constabulary Ranger School at Camp Castenada, Luzon.

RESETTLEMENT CAMP NCO: Served on Guam during resettlement of Vietnamese refugees following evacuation of Pnom Penh and Saigon.

AMPHIBIOUS RAIDER COURSE: With Co. A, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion at Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. Included submarine and rubber boat training as well as long-range reconnaissance techniques.

COMBAT ENGINEER AND DEMOLITION: Underwent training with Co. A,. 3rd Engineer Battalion in Western Pacific.

FIELD ARTILLERY: Trained on 105mm howitzers with 1st Battalion, 12th Marines at Pohakuloa Training Area in Hawaii.

JUNGLE WARFARE TRAINING AND INSTRUCTOR COURSE: Okinawa, Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii and Panama Canal Zone.

RANGE OFFICER/MARKSMANSHIP INSTRUCTOR: Extra duties while attached to 2nd Marine Division at Camp Lejeune, NC.

TANK and AMPHIBIAN TRACTOR DUTY: Trained in AmTracs at 1st Marine Brigade in Hawaii and in M60A1 tanks with 2nd Tank Battalion at Camp Lejeune, NC.

MOUNTAIN LEADER/ARCTIC WARFARE: Training with 42 Commando, Royal Marines in northern Norway and with Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry above the Arctic Circle.

FRENCH FOREIGN LEGION: Trained with Legion units at Castelnaudry in France, at Calvi on Corsica and Sardinia, and at Djibouti on the Horn of Africa.

SECURITY AND STABILITY OPERATIONS: Served with 24th Marine Amphibious Unit in Beirut, Lebanon, 1982-83.

GUERILLA FORCES TRAINING: Trained forces of anti-guerilla forces in El Salvador as well as anti-Sandanista ARDE and FDN forces in Cost Rica and Honduras.

SNIPING AND DESERT OPERATIONS: Trained with Golani Brigade of Israeli Defense Forces in Negev Desert, Israel.http://www.warriorsinc.com/DyeMilBio.cfm

Richard
02-20-2012, 16:35
Richard FWIW, The below bio is from his website, hope this helps?

I'm just curious as to when he picked them up and at what point he decided to add them to his uniform...

Richard :munchin

tom kelly
02-20-2012, 23:30
I received this documented information from
Department of the Army
Army Review Boards Agency
Board for the correction of Military Records
1901 South Bell Street 2nd Floor
Arlington, VA. 22202-4508

On November 26, 2007 The Army Board for Correction of Military Records rendered a decision on your application to correct your military records: Page 6, Discussion and Conclusions: item no.3 Evidence of record showes that the applicant completed the Republic of Vietnam Special Forces Parachute training on 24 May 1964. HOWEVER, Army Regulation 635-5 states that training courses for combat skills will not be listed in item 29 of the DD Form 214.
Paragraph no.4. The "Vietnamese Parachute Badge" is not listed in Army Regulation 600-8-22 as an authorized award and therefore it is not authorized foe entry on the DD Form 214. More importantly, there is no evidence to show that the Republic of Vietnam awarded to him or, if it was awarded to him, that the proper authorities authorized him to accept and wear it.
The U S Army Special Forces Vietnam Provisional later to become the th Special Forces Group taught The Airborne Parachute Course including making parachute jumps with the South Vietnamese Special Forces (LLDB). NO AMERICAN CIVILAN or MILITARY personal were in these classes.
Since The Vietnamese Parachute Badge is not listed on my DD 214 I DO NOT and Never have worn it....Documentation avaiable upon request.
May Be the Marines have different critera....Regard's, Tom Kelly
P S: while on this subject; another point of history is often misrepesented. The only combat jump made during the Vietnam War was Operation Junction City. It took place mid-morning hrs. Feb.22,1967 west of Kotum in the Tay Ninh area. The Jump Manifest lists 845 names ,ranks, and Army serial numbers. The Drop Zone was SECURE there were other american paratroopers,Pathfinders on the ground before the green light went on at 0900 hrs.The names on the jump manifest are on-line Jump Manifest of Junction City and the site is up-dated constantly by The 173 Airborne Birgade Association. Over the years I have met people who claimed to have made that combat jump; BUT, their names are NOT listed on the manifest.I personally know one of the people on the manifese Pfc. Joseph P. Bayne

Brush Okie
02-21-2012, 00:40
I It took place mid-morning hrs. Feb.22,1967 west of Kotum in the Tay Ninh area. The Jump Manifest lists 845 names ,ranks, and Army serial numbers. The Drop Zone was SECURE there were other american paratroopers,Pathfinders on the ground before the green light went on at 0900 hrs.The names on the jump manifest are on-line Jump Manifest of Junction City and the site is up-dated constantly by The 173 Airborne Birgade Association. Over the years I have met people who claimed to have made that combat jump; BUT, their names are NOT listed on the manifest.I personally know one of the people on the manifest Pfc. Joseph P. Bayne

My understanding is that is the only official combat jump however there were several HALO jumps that would have been considered combat jumps if they were not classified. It was way before my time and I am sure many here if not yourself have first hand knowledge of this. Is it possible he was somehow involved in this type of jump.

PSM
02-21-2012, 08:44
CSM Plumley sports them as well:

S. B. Newman
02-21-2012, 09:10
I don't know the answer to the question, but I have asked and I am waiting for a reply. As soon as I get a response and if I get one, I will post it on here. It may be awhile.

In my research about the question pertaining to ARVN Jump Wings, I did find this interesting bit of information that many of you might enjoy. http://www.library.vanderbilt.edu/central/Brush/Aerial-Lifeline-Khe-Sanh.htm

And folks, if you go onto my blog to check out the interview. Please check out the post I wrote titled "My Goal.". I could really use your help in achieving it! Thank you very much!

S

Richard
02-21-2012, 09:48
CSM Plumley sports them as well:

CSM Plumley needs to correct the order of the arrangement of his ribbons... ;)

Richard :munchin

f50lrrp
02-21-2012, 10:07
B-36 sent me and SFC Cheney to Dong Ba Thin to go through the 5th SFGA jump School!:lifter

S. B. Newman
02-21-2012, 11:14
CSM Plumley sports them as well:

Not sure CSM Plumley is sporting ARVN wings. It could be that his wings are actually French, since the two are pretty much....identical and considering his background. Read this: http://cgsc.cdmhost.com/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15040coll2/id/5327/rec/2

They're not French, I've been told. Doesn't mean he isn't authorized...

S. B. Newman
02-21-2012, 13:07
Looks like some american personnel did attend jump school there. Did you ever file this certificate for orders to be authorized to wear the wings?

B-36 sent me and SFC Cheney to Dong Ba Thin to go through the 5th SFGA jump School!:lifter

Stras
02-22-2012, 14:19
Not sure CSM Plumley is sporting ARVN wings. It could be that his wings are actually French, since the two are pretty much....identical and considering his background. Read this: http://cgsc.cdmhost.com/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15040coll2/id/5327/rec/2

They're not French, I've been told. Doesn't mean he isn't authorized...

Here's the French Wings..

tom kelly
02-22-2012, 23:31
The parachute badge(Jump Wings) worn by SGM.(R) Basil Plumley as shown in the photo in post #19 are the ARVN wings. The slight difference between the French and ARVN parachute badges is that the French wings have golden folige(similar to the olive branch held in the right talon of the eagle inThe Great Seal of The United States) located on both sides of the star at the bottom of the chute....TK

PS. The SGM was 92 years old on Jan.1,2012 and has 5 combat jumps, 4 in WWII and 1 in Korea with the 187th RCT.

Richard
02-23-2012, 06:23
The Vietnamese, Cambodian, and Laotian parachutist badges are all similar in that they are patterned after the French wings because all three were once a part of the French colony of Indochina (Indochine Française).

If you look at the various parachutist badges throughout the world, you will find a similar pattern of their being copied from those of the major powers with which they were aligned, especially those influenced by France, Great Britain, and the USA.

All that being said, I'm still curious as to how Mr Dye came about wearing the ARVN wings. :confused:

Richard :munchin

f50lrrp
02-23-2012, 15:37
Looks like some american personnel did attend jump school there. Did you ever file this certificate for orders to be authorized to wear the wings?

Yes I did! My MOS became 11F4PSVS - Infantry Intelligence & Operations Specialist - Airborne Qualified - With a Language Code for having the ability to speak VIETANMESE (SVS).

The DD214 also shows that I grauated from Pathfinder, Recondo School and the MATTA Senior NCO Co

Edited by Richard - I removed your DD214 and suggest you blank out your SSAN before reposting or posting it in any open threads. ;)

tom kelly
02-23-2012, 17:00
The Vietnamese, Cambodian, and Laotian parachutist badges are all similar in that they are patterned after the French wings because all three were once a part of the French colony of Indochina (Indochine Française).

If you look at the various parachutist badges throughout the world, you will find a similar pattern of their being copied from those of the major powers with which they were aligned, especially those influenced by France, Great Britain, and the USA.

All that being said, I'm still curious as to how Mr Dye came about wearing the ARVN wings. :confused:

Richard :munchin

Capt.(R) Dale Dye does not seem to be wearing U S Army Parachute wings on his dress blues. I do not think he would have attended ARVN parachute training without first attending the US Army Special Forces parachute training?The 5th Special Forces Gp. conducted parachute school and The Long Range Recon school in Vietnam. Since Dale Dye was a Marine, i doubt if he could get a slot at jump school, The only Marines that I knew that were on jump status were The Force Recon Marines & they were all jump qualified before going to Vietnam. ...TK

PSM
06-20-2017, 20:13
After working as an actor and/or technical director on many films including Saving Private Ryan, Platoon, The Pacific, Band of Brothers, and others, Dale Dye is on a mission to make his own movie based on the battle at La Fiere Bridge on D-Day:

No Better Place to Die (https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/no-better-place-to-die-film-war#/)

He's crowdfunding it.

The Facebook page: https://twitter.com/CaptDaleDye

Pat

TOMAHAWK9521
06-21-2017, 00:27
Black Rifle Coffee Company did a promo for it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnIVW-N69Sc :D

PSM
06-21-2017, 11:33
Black Rifle Coffee Company did a promo for it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnIVW-N69Sc :D

:D I hope both those guys get rolls . . . in fact rolls and coffee as the on-set caterers. :D

Pat