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frostfire
07-30-2011, 22:39
gents, ladies,

if you've been a grader (badge protector...ahem), would you care to shed some insight/stories etc. on what/how one fails other than the obvious mistakes/deviations from the reference? Likewise if you've earned one.

I'd like to gain some lesson-learned from others. I get it that depending on who's running it, it may be a whole lot different from place to place, person to person.

I already got all the resources from AKO, test practice books, and previous attendees in my unit. I also plan to dry-rehearse and mental-rehearse the 3 lanes just like in shooting match stages. Finally, just working out with emphasis on lifting and various carrying/dragging, night land nav practice, and of course, 12 mile rucking.

adal
07-30-2011, 23:59
The biggest thing I remember was to follow the rules, to the letter. If the lane says "verbalize BSI, head tilt chin lift, you go get help and I'm going to start CPR." than that is exactly what you do. There were quite a few guys that failed because they did not verbalize exactly like it said. I can't say that there were any badge protectors when I went, but I followed directions. Dont get caught up in the hype of people wargaming what lanes is what and the wheres and hows, just do what you're supposed to do. That's all I got. Hope it helps.

Boomer-61
07-31-2011, 13:44
I tested for and got mine in Bad something Germany in 1982. I had prepared for about 9 months but I was not far from basic and MOS training at the time so all the basic infantry stuff was still fresh on my mind. The three most common things I remember snagging folks was, 1. encryption/radio communications, 2. the 12 mile ruck, 3. night time land nav. in that order.

SpikedBuck
08-01-2011, 20:23
The success rate at the EFMB is usually below 20%...not because the graders fail folks without cause, but because that is the historical average of the EFMB. EFMB is centralized/standardized/monitored by the AMEDDC&S which greatly helps with eliminating the subjectivity.

The best advice I can give you is concentrate on one "lane" at a time...if you follow the steps outlined in the references, you will come out okay. Don't blow off the "easy" stuff (i.e. MOPP gear exchange, CPR, survival skills, etc) because that can eat your lunch just as quickly as the EMT lane. Best advice I can give is read the book and pay attention during the train-up week. The written test is challenging if you not prepared. Also, stay healthy so the road march becomes just another day of PT. Be careful not to injure yourself during the manual carries/evac lane as that will affect your road march...seen a lot of fit Soldiers go down hard because they injured themselves or wrenched their back on the Evac lane and struggled through the <3 hour road march standard.

Just remember, one lane at a time. Good luck!

Doc_Shane
02-11-2012, 21:31
It took me two tries to get the EFMB and that was almost 20 years ago the part that killed most us was the ruck march, most of the guys I took it with we were all National Guard and the fact that we didn't PT as hard as the AD guys was very apparent.

I am sure it has changed some over the years but it was tougher than we expected and all of us were good medics and most were civilian EMT-I and EMT-P so it wasn't the skills assessments.

I failed the first time specifically because the ruck march kicked my but, pay attention and do it the way they want or you go home without the badge.

stfesta
02-12-2012, 13:18
I know a lot of people who train up to go to the EFMB. There is a very high failure rate and a very good reason for that.

I am a BLS instructor, if I had to take the EFMB BLS portion right now, I would fail it. Not because I don't know the current guidelines, I do. That's the problem. The EFMB is governed by an AR (book). Any idea how hard it is to change an AR? The BLS that is being taught is from it's last update.

In order to pass the EFMB, you have to adhere to the guideline put forth by the AR (they are not up to date with today's medicine).

You should go out to the EFMB physically fit, the 12 miler hasn't changed, it's still 12 miles.

What you should do is pay very close attention during the train up week. The people who are going to train you are the same people who are going to test you. They will tell you exactly what they are looking for. They will tell you exactly what to say. Most people fail because they fail to pay attention to detail.

I was told I was going to Sunday's EFMB on a Friday. I had one day to get my gear ready. I did exactly what was asked of me during the training week and I passed.

Have a great time, is't suppose to be fun.
sf

Surgicalcric
02-12-2012, 13:28
I remember being told by the EFMB NCOIC (dont remember his name now) the 82nd was running back when I was in the SFQC that showing up would be a waste of our (recent 18D grads awaiting Sage) time as we would never pass.

When I asked about it he pointed to his AA patch and said, "this isnt SF." :rolleyes:

Asked about the EIB lanes a few days earlier and was told basically the same thing.

stfesta
02-13-2012, 15:58
I was in 7th Group when I went to the EFMB (hosted by the 82 ABN DIV), I did what I said in my earlier post and let my actions speak for themselves.

You can't fail me if I do everything the exact way you told me to do it.

I had a smile on my face the entire time and I used my SF skills to win over the hearts and minds.

I didn't pass because someone didn't like me is a crutch. Figure out what you need to do in order to win and then do it.
sf

Surgicalcric
02-13-2012, 18:33
...I didn't pass because someone didn't like me is a crutch. Figure out what you need to do in order to win and then do it.
sf

Use it as a crutch...thats funny.

being in the SFQC, we werent afforded the time to prepare for events that test ones ability to do the wrong thing the right way, like others. We were attempting to work it in while trying to prep everything to head out to RS. Since then I have not been afforded the chance as being on an ODA and keeping up with those requirements take up my time...

stfesta
02-13-2012, 19:40
We are always preparing for something. That's just how it goes. I went into totally blind.
sf

Surgicalcric
02-13-2012, 20:27
We are always preparing for something. That's just how it goes. I went into totally blind.

I was told I was going to Sunday's EFMB on a Friday. I had one day to get my gear ready. I did exactly what was asked of me during the training week and I passed.

We didn't have the time for that week's worth of practice doing the right thing the wrong way.

Que Sera Sera!

But I guess you are just a better medic than the 11 of us. ;)

The Reaper
02-13-2012, 20:39
All it takes is one evaluator who is badge protecting to keep anyone from getting it.

He doesn't even have to cheat. Just watch you real closely.

We used to have 18D instructors failing students because the students were allegedly inserting the IV needles 5 degrees off straight up bevel. Failed to met the specified standard, you are a NO GO at this station.

Saw the same thing at EIB testing. Passed everything else, "stayed up too long" while throwing the grenade. Up, orient, aim, toss, and back down behind cover. "Too slow. NO GO. Next."

TR

stfesta
02-13-2012, 21:34
Can one person make for a bad day.....yes.

Should you do everything to mitigate that......yes.

If you were getting ready for RS why were you trying to "squeeze" in the EFMB? Where is your focus? With such a high attrition rate, I would think the EFMB would be a single event, not an after thought.

As for your busy schedule, being on an ODA, we were all on ODA's. In almost 10 years on an ODA, (never a day on a B team) I managed to fit it in.

Lastly, as far as the I must be better than the 11 of you.....happy face. Don't give me a back handed insult. I never said I was better than anyone. I simply stated the best way to get through the EFMB.
sf

Surgicalcric
02-13-2012, 22:35
<<SNIP>>

Taken to PM....

frostfire
02-14-2012, 20:26
What you should do is pay very close attention during the train up week. The people who are going to train you are the same people who are going to test you. They will tell you exactly what they are looking for. They will tell you exactly what to say. Most people fail because they fail to pay attention to detail.

Not 100% true. It's all about the 350-10. I went to the rebuttal board twice. The first one I said I did it exactly what the cadre during train up week told me. The broad pulled 350-10 and showed the discrepancy. NO GO. There are variance in what the cadres show/emphasize etc. during train up week. I'm not accusing badge protector. They are humans too. The second rebuttal was for ID-ing the wrong IED. I went to the board and showed I did A to Z exactly following 350-10 on that task. GO. I gladly admit that's an instant no-go in real world. So common sense, PALS, ACLS, ATLS, BLS, etc out of the window. Nothing, and nothing else but 350-10 (and the integrity/honor violation codes). The guy who aced the medical lane with perfect score was a field sanitation MOS! I lament the fact that my medical database suffered after 2 weeks of 350-10, but I really liked the camaraderie. We got from E1 to full bird Colonel. No one pulled rank. Officer and enlisted all studied and rehearsed together as students. I also enjoyed the CBRNE lane as I drew from marksmanship competition the skills and mindset (speed = economy of motion) to put the mask in <7s.

Thus, IMHO, it's Expert Field Memorization Badge, designed to test whether one can follow simple instruction, pay attention to detail, and do these under moderate stress. Don't get me wrong, I have full respect to those who get it. I myself was 10 feet away from the badge. It's just the badge has nothing to do of being an "expert" medic. If someone is about to help me down range and claim that he/she has no training but has the EFMB badge I would tell them to let me die in peace and less injury.

"....practice doing the right thing the wrong way. "
Stolen. Thanks! :D

There's one coming at Ft Dix btw

stfesta
02-14-2012, 20:44
That is an excellent post. Everything said is true. You can't take out the human error, all you can do it try to minimize it.

When I went, it was a lot of memorization. It has nothing to do with medicine proper. I was also impressed with the cohesion of all walks of life. The EFMB don't care your rank. As soon as all realized that, the happier we all were.

I wish you nothing but the best, if you are going to the one on Fort Bragg, look me up, especially if you are not from Fort Bragg. Anything you need, I probably have.

I went out and told myself I was going to have a great time and that is exactly what I did. Once I took the pressure of "The Badge" off, there was nothing left to do but have fun.
sf