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Martinez
02-01-2004, 16:05
Rank and organization: First Lieutenant, U.S. Army, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces
Place and date: Republic of Vietnam, 30 December 1968
Entered service at: Montgomery, Alabama
Born: 11 July 1939, Opelika, Alabama

Citation:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. 1st Lt. Howard (then SFC.), distinguished himself while serving as platoon sergeant of an American-Vietnamese platoon which was on a mission to rescue a missing American soldier in enemy controlled territory in the Republic of Vietnam. The platoon had left its helicopter landing zone and was moving out on its mission when it was attacked by an estimated 2-company force. During the initial engagement, 1st Lt. Howard was wounded and his weapon destroyed by a grenade explosion. 1st Lt. Howard saw his platoon leader had been wounded seriously and was exposed to fire. Although unable to walk, and weaponless, 1st Lt. Howard unhesitatingly crawled through a hail of fire to retrieve his wounded leader. As 1st Lt. Howard was administering first aid and removing the officer's equipment, an enemy bullet struck 1 of the ammunition pouches on the lieutenant's belt, detonating several magazines of ammunition. 1st Lt. Howard momentarily sought cover and then realizing that he must rejoin the platoon, which had been disorganized by the enemy attack, he again began dragging the seriously wounded officer toward the platoon area. Through his outstanding example of indomitable courage and bravery, 1st Lt. Howard was able to rally the platoon into an organized defense force. With complete disregard for his safety, 1st Lt. Howard crawled from position to position, administering first aid to the wounded, giving encouragement to the defenders and directing their fire on the encircling enemy. For 3 1/2 hours 1st Lt. Howard's small force and supporting aircraft successfully repulsed enemy attacks and finally were in sufficient control to permit the landing of rescue helicopters. 1st Lt. Howard personally supervised the loading of his men and did not leave the bullet-swept landing zone until all were aboard safely. 1st Lt. Howard's gallantry in action, his complete devotion to the welfare of his men at the risk of his life were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

For more information and photos, visit Col. Howard's web site (http://members.cox.net/rlhtribute/index.htm)

The Reaper
02-01-2004, 17:00
COL Howard, you are THE MAN!!

Well done, Sir.

TR

desafiamos
02-01-2004, 19:39
2nd what you said TR. I recently had the honor of speaking with Col. Howard and he truly is "the man".

NousDefionsDoc
02-01-2004, 19:55
Should have received the other two as well. The Man indeed.

Team Sergeant
02-01-2004, 22:02
Originally posted by desafiamos
2nd what you said TR. I recently had the honor of speaking with Col. Howard and he truly is "the man".

I had the honor of first meeting Col Howard (Maj then) at Phase One, where he proceeded to "ruck" my ass (and many other young studs) into the ground.

The man is harder than woodpecker lips.

Ambush Master
02-01-2004, 23:09
Not trying to "One Up" any one here, but I had the honor of working for the then Captain Bob Howard, CO of Recon Company, (more of a Platoon!), at Command and Control Central, Kontum, RVN.

I will say that I have never worked for anyone, before or since, that I respect as much as him !!! I will put together some of my thoughts and memories, from when I worked WITH him in RVN.

Later
Martin

The Reaper
02-01-2004, 23:12
AM:

While you are at it, tell some Billy Waugh stories.

TR

Martinez
02-02-2004, 07:31
Ah that Billy... he is also the Man!!!

Jennifer sends

Doc
02-14-2004, 16:58
Originally posted by Ambush Master
Not trying to "One Up" any one here, but I had the honor of working for the then Captain Bob Howard, CO of Recon Company, (more of a Platoon!), at Command and Control Central, Kontum, RVN.

I will say that I have never worked for anyone, before or since, that I respect as much as him !!! I will put together some of my thoughts and memories, from when I worked WITH him in RVN.

Later
Martin

Please do.

I've met him and believe that he's one of the greatest Soldier's in US History.

Martinez
02-29-2004, 11:39
.

FILO
02-29-2004, 16:44
Originally posted by Doc
Please do.

I've met him and believe that he's one of the greatest Soldier's in US History.

I also met him and second your opinion. Very humble guy as well!

colmurph
04-28-2004, 11:56
Bob Howard was my Rater and Bill Carpenter was my Sr. Rater for my OER's when I was with SOC-K in 1986-87. I worked for him as DCSO for Special Ops for Combined Forces Army, 8th Army and UN Command. Hell of a guy! Gave me a good OER too!

SOGvet
04-28-2004, 22:45
Bob Howard would have been a general, but he had a thing about pinching some very senior officer's wives on the ass during his last tour in Korea...

God bless you sir!... those leg's wives loved every damned minute of it!

De Oppresso Liber

NousDefionsDoc
09-25-2004, 13:19
Every now and then I come here or go to the tribute site for a refresher. These were giants among men.

alphamale
09-25-2004, 16:15
Me too.

Reading these sections makes me feel good.

FrontSight

BamBam
09-27-2004, 09:05
"BAD BOB HOWARD" truly the MAN, had the pleasure of working for and with COl Howard it was an experience I wil never forget, enjoyed evey minute of it. He was truly a person who supported his NCOs.

TerribleTobyt
02-11-2005, 12:29
He was the Guest Speaker at SFA CHXV's Annual Christmas Party here in San Antone. A pic from that occaission is at my "Friends..." thread in the Base Camp.

Wish I could figger out howta convert the video I took of his speech that nite to summmpm I can post here.

Any idees anybody??????

Toby-so proud of my relationship with this great man!!!!!!!!

Martinez
02-11-2005, 20:20
Toby,

You know Neil Horn don't you? Why don't you email him and ask. If anyone can do it, or figure it out, Neil can. BC me if you need his email address.

Jennifer sends

lksteve
02-11-2005, 21:12
I had the honor of first meeting Col Howard (Maj then) at Phase One, where he proceeded to "ruck" my ass (and many other young studs) into the ground.

The man is harder than woodpecker lips.

but he was the chief of either tower or ground branch when i went through jump school....

dayum, that was a long time ago...seems like yesterday...,.

lksteve

x SF med
05-30-2006, 13:18
TS-
Was that honor or horror? I kinda remember it as both when I went through, Maj Howard was one bad mf when it came to rucking - and the grenade simulators in the quonsets were a way to lively up a very late night........

QRQ 30
05-31-2006, 14:18
TYhe first time I met him he was issuing my gear at FOB-2 in 1968. I thought he was the baddest supply sergeant I ever saw.:D

PeteyMcPete
05-31-2006, 19:23
Sounds like one hell of a guy.

QRQ 30
05-31-2006, 19:42
Sounds like one hell of a guy.

A classid understatement. Col. Howard personofies every positive attreibute I can think of for a Special Forces Trooper to include se;flessness and fearlessness.

The second time I met him he had a team assembled to rescue or recover my team. He was always at the front of the line of volunteers for Bright Light Missions.

Q
06-08-2006, 02:20
Met alot of heros in my time. Never met Col. Howard or Billy Waugh...wished I did. Great men are gauged on what they have left behind for the rest of us "common folk". Salud sir! Here is a cold one for ya! How come I never hear about "Mad Dog". "Q".

NousDefionsDoc
08-15-2007, 20:35
http://www.rlhtribute.com/

The tribute site has been updated. Nice new look.

x SF med
08-15-2007, 21:46
Thanks NDD.

I didn't realize COL H went to TCU also... nice surprise, since it's my alma mater. Of course, he was the Headmaster of the MacKall School when I attended it, during my "between college classes phase".

uplink5
06-06-2008, 14:26
I think it was in 2000 when as a Phase III instructor at Camp Mackall, I was told there would be a VA rep and former SWC CMDR to talk about the VA to us. I forgot all about it since we had troops in Uwharrie at the time and it wasn't a priority. I pulled into Mackall to grab something and go but was stopped by the F co. SGM who said he had someone I needed to meet. He introduced me to Mr Howard. SGM had informed him of my medical issues and that I was someone who needed to talk to him, and so, we did. After we had talked for a bit, as this gentleman was getting into a truck to leave, he encouraged me to come to DC before I retired to see him, so he could make sure I had been taken care of upon retirement. I thanked him and told him I would.

Aftr our conversation, one of our warrents says "you don't know who that was, do you?" I think I said something like "yea, that's Mr Howard". Chief says, yes but, follow me. I followed him to his computer and there on the screen was Col. Bob Howard's MOH BIO and Photo. Needless to say I truly was, at that moment, lower than whale shit and dipped in sheep dip.

I had read the bio before, along with so many others. Here was a man whom I'd revered for his exploits, as a hero of mine and I hadn't recognized him, and its perhaps better that I didn't for I'd been sure to have said something stupid like "YOU DA MAN"....

Well, anyways. Bob, if you're out there, I still haven’t retired and I've even managed to rack up a couple more medical emergencies since then but, I'll always regard my conversation with you as an indicator of your unpretentious nature and genuine concern for the average joe. As well as my brush with one of our greatest American heroes. Thanks

God bless you BOB, YOU DA MAN!!!!!

Richard
03-25-2009, 19:36
CBS News report on MOH Recognition Day hi-lighting Bob Howard.

Unsung War Hero Gets Recognition

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/03/25/eveningnews/main4893409.shtml

(CBS) Robert Howard was the toughest, bravest cat in the jungle, but he deserved a better war than Vietnam. He was nominated for the Medal of Honor three times for three separate operations behind enemy lines.

But, as CBS News correspondent David Martin reports, when President Nixon finally awarded him the nation?s highest honor, the ceremony was actually delayed by anti-war protests. He was a war hero at a time when Americans didn?t believe in either the war or its heroes. He was wounded 14 times and has no business being alive.

?Here I come face-to-face with a platoon of enemy soldiers and so I?m standing with my weapon like this, and they fire directly at me and I fell backwards like this, and I didn?t get killed,? Howard explained.

That was just the beginning of the fire fight for which he was awarded the Medal of Honor. It ended when, out of ammunition, he called in a 2,000-pound bomb.

?I said 'I want you to put it right on our position',? Howard said. ?It blew us and the enemy up. Next thing I know, we?re still alive.?

He?s still picking shrapnel out of his body.

?I got a piece that?s coming out of my side on this side this morning,? he said. ?It bothers me.?

Howard says he doesn?t think he?ll ever get it all out.

America loves war heroes. There was Sgt. York in WWI, Audie Murphy in WWII. But in Vietnam, there were only scapegoats. Except there?s Robert Howard, who single-handedly captured 44 enemy soldiers and brought them back alive for questioning.

?I carried a damn enemy soldier for nine days because he was important and other people were trying to kill him,? Howard said.

He did five combat tours in Vietnam and is about to pay his fifth visit to the troops in Iraq.

?I teach them how to survive on the battlefield,? he said. ?I teach them how to weigh courage and fear. You can balance that.?

He can walk through the streets of Manhattan without anyone knowing who he is or what he?s done. Until today, when President Obama found out who Robert Howard is. Together, they and the 37 other Medal of Honor winners from WWII, Korea and Vietnam laid a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns.

Robert Howard is an unknown hero no longer.

mark46th
03-25-2009, 20:45
Have to agree with Nous- From what I have heard, he should have had 3....

Nick710
04-08-2009, 22:04
Colonel (then Major) Howard was the Phase I Commander when I did the Q-course back in 1982. He scared the hell out of us and his ruck runs were legendary. I'll never forget standing in formation as 0200 and have him speak to us. His speeches always ended with "Men, I want to challenge you today . . . " You could hear a collective moan coming from the formation as every man knew what was coming.

I'll never forget those 6 weeks or so at Camp Mackall.

mac117
04-09-2009, 07:12
yep....startled me so bad I almost dropped the 60. As intimidating as he seemed....you could talk with him. It was truly an honor to just be around him.

alright4u
04-09-2009, 16:27
Yes, I recall him. All the SOG FOB's had their legends. Word traveled fast about the truly outstanding men from each FOB. I saw Bob, Zab , and Dix in 69-early 70 at Bragg after I got out of Womack in late July. The last time I saw Bob was at Benning in 72-73 when I was in the IOAC. Bob was assigned to the airborne school. He was a CPT then. Bob always stood out as someone you wanted with you.

MDH
04-20-2009, 15:49
I’ll never forget his in brief; all of us young kids, sitting in the JFK Auditorium.
“I’m that Baddest MFing Airborne, Ranger, Green Beret any of you will ever meet, I could jump down there and kill half of you…… the other half of you will kill yourselves trying to get away from me. Welcome to Special Forces Training….. Now get on the Fing buss”

He also gave me a reality check on pain during one of the "Midnight Rucks" you never forget the lessons that real hero's teach.

colmurph
12-24-2009, 19:05
Hey folks, he's passed on to the next life. He will be buried in Arlington but no daye as of yet. It would probably be a good thing if some of us were to attend the funeral.

CoLawman
12-25-2009, 14:40
Rest in Peace Sir.

Mr_PreScuba
12-26-2009, 00:29
Rest in Peace, Sir...

and I'm still trying to figure out how you could pick us out by name when we were huffing and puffing... trying to keep up with you on the ruck marches at Phase I...

It was truly an honor to have met and known you... you were one of the inspirations that kept me going.

Team Sergeant
12-26-2009, 10:24
Arlington National Cemetery Website:


December 23, 2009) - Retired Army Colonel Robert L. Howard, 70, who died Wednesday in Waco, Texas, was a Medal of Honor recipient who at the time of his death was believed to be the most-decorated living American soldier.


Howard will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Services were pending Wednesday through Oak Crest Funeral Home in Waco.

Texas Governor Rick Perry issued a statement late Wednesday afternoon in which he said Howard “was the bravest soldier I ever met.”

“His unshakeable commitment to freedom, displayed in countless episodes of battlefield gallantry, lives on in the actions of our military men and women who continue to serve in hostile conditions overseas,” he said.

Howard, who grew up in Opelika, Alabama, enlisted in the Army in 1956 at the age of 17 and retired as a full Colonel in 1992.

In Vietnam, he served in the U.S. Army Special Forces and spent most of his five tours in the secret Military Assistance Command, Vietnam-Studies and Observation Group, or MACV-SOG, which was an unconventional force whose members were assigned to deep-penetration reconnaissance and interdiction missions.

He was nominated three times for the Medal of Honor, which he was awarded in 1971 for the rescue of a seriously wounded platoon leader who was under enemy fire.

During his 54 months of combat duty in Vietnam, Howard was wounded 14 times and was awarded eight Purple Heart Medals.

He leaves behind his children, Denicia Howard of Florida, Melissa Gentsch and husband, Waco Assistant Chief of Police Frank Gentsch of Waco, Rosslyn Howard of California and Robert Howard, Jr. and his wife, Tori of California.



-------------------------------------------------------------

Howard entered the Army at Montgomery, Alabama and retired as Colonel.
As a staff sergeant of the highly-classified Military Assistance Command, Vietnam - Studies and Observations Group (MACV-SOG), Howard was recommended for the Medal of Honor on three separate occasions for three individual actions during thirteen months spanning 1967-1968. The first two nominations were downgraded to the award of the Distinguished Service Cross due to the covert nature of the operations in which Howard participated. As a Sergeant First Class of the same organization, he risked his life during a rescue mission in Cambodia on December 30, 1968, while second in command of a platoon-sized Hornet force that was searching for missing American soldier Robert Scherdin, and was finally awarded the Medal of Honor.

While leading a covert SOG platoon-sized mission in southeastern Laos on November 16, 1967, Sergeant First Class Howard carried out actions that led to his being recommended for his nation’s highest honor. While the main body destroyed an enemy cache, Howard’s team came upon four North Vietnamese Army soldiers, whom he shot. The team was then pinned down by heavy machine gun fire. Howard first eliminated a sniper and then charged the machine gun position, killing its occupants. When a second machine gun opened up, he crawled forward to within point-blank range and threw a hand grenade, disabling that gun.

When more of the North Vietnamese took over the same gun, Howard stood in the open and fired a light anti-tank weapon, knocking it out once again. The team was then successfully extracted by helicopter. Although recommended for the Medal of Honor, Howard’s award was downgraded to the Distinguished Service Cross. This would be the first of three recommendations within 13 months for the Medal of Honor for Robert Howard.

In mid-November Howard accompanied an FOB-2 Hatchet Platoon into Laos. After four days in the area, on November 19, 1968, the force was ambushed by Vietnamese troops, including a Soviet-built PT-76 tank. Braving intense fire, Howard crept forward and knocked out the PT-76 with an anti-tank rocket. After a medivac helicopter was shot down, Howard, already wounded, charged forward 300 yards through North Vietnamese fire to lead the two pilots and a wounded door gunner to safety. He was again wounded, this time by 14 pieces of shrapnel, but all that this seemed to do was aggravate him.

He charged the Vietnamese, killed two and dragged back a third as a prisoner. North Vietnamese anti-aircraft fire halted the extraction of the platoon until the following morning, when Howard, already perforated multiple times, moved forward and silenced a 37 mm anti-aircraft gun, allowing the extraction to be completed. For the second time, Howard was recommended for the Medal of Honor, but his award was again downgraded to a Distinguished Service Cross.

This series of events illustrates the difficulties faced when special operations personnel exhibited extraordinary bravery in denied areas. Recommendations for decorations always stipulated the location and circumstances of the action, and since the award of such a high decoration became public knowledge, the citation would have to be changed to place the action within territorial South Vietnam. The U.S. Congress and President were loath to create any sense of falsehood about the actions of the nation’s most highly decorated military personnel, so, in many instances, awards were downgraded to keep the recipient out of the limelight.

On December 30, 1968 Howard was serving as a member of a 40-man Bright Light rescue mission into northeastern Cambodia. The unit was in search of MACSOG Private First Class Robert Scherdin, who had been separated from his recon team. Bypassing a North Vietnamese Army company, Howard was leading his men up a hill when he and Lieutenant Jim Jerson were wounded by a land mine. While administering first aid to Jerson, a bullet struck one of the wounded man’s ammunition pouches, detonating several magazines. His fingers in shreds, Howard was dragging Jerson off the hill when he was shot in the foot.

The remaining 20 men were organized by Howard, who administered first aid, directed their fire, and encouraged them to resist. After three and one-half hours under attack, Howard prepared for a fight to the death. The team was saved from that fate, however, when an emergency night extraction took them off without any further casualties. As badly wounded as he was, Howard was the last man to board a helicopter. After his third recommendation in 13 months, Robert Howard was finally awarded a well-deserved Medal of Honor.

Perhaps no man represented the quandary of the political and moral dilemma of the Vietnam War in the heart and mind of America better than Howard. He had become arguably the most highly decorated serviceman in American military history, yet few of his countrymen even knew who he was. Unlike Alvin York or Audie Murphy before him, Howard was not touted as a national hero by the media, he was given no ticker tape parade, and no Hollywood movie was made depicting his extraordinary exploits. Of course, none of this bothered the quiet, unassuming Howard. He remained in the Army and retired as a full Colonel, after 36 years of active service, in September 1992.

It is believed by some historians that Howard is the most highly-decorated living American soldier in history. His residence was in Texas and he spent much of his free time working with veterans at the time of his death. He also took periodic trips to Iraq to visit active duty troops.


--------------------------------------------------------------
The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to
FIRST LIEUTENANT
ROBERT L. HOWARD
UNITED STATES ARMY

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. 1st Lt. Howard (then SFC), distinguished himself while serving as platoon sergeant of an American-Vietnamese platoon which was on a mission to rescue a missing American soldier in enemy controlled territory in the Republic of Vietnam.

The platoon had left its helicopter landing zone and was moving out on its mission when it was attacked by an estimated 2-company force. During the initial engagement, 1st Lt. Howard was wounded and his weapon destroyed by a grenade explosion. 1st Lt. Howard saw his platoon leader had been wounded seriously and was exposed to fire. Although unable to walk, and weaponless, 1st Lt. Howard unhesitatingly crawled through a hail of fire to retrieve his wounded leader. As 1st Lt. Howard was administering first aid and removing the officer's equipment, an enemy bullet struck 1 of the ammunition pouches on the lieutenant's belt, detonating several magazines of ammunition. 1st Lt. Howard momentarily sought cover and then realizing that he must rejoin the platoon, which had been disorganized by the enemy attack, he again began dragging the seriously wounded officer toward the platoon area.

Through his outstanding example of indomitable courage and bravery, 1st Lt. Howard was able to rally the platoon into an organized defense force. With complete disregard for his safety, 1st Lt. Howard crawled from position to position, administering first aid to the wounded, giving encouragement to the defenders and directing their fire on the encircling enemy. For 3 1/2 hours 1st Lt. Howard's small force and supporting aircraft successfully repulsed enemy attacks and finally were in sufficient control to permit the landing of rescue helicopters. 1st Lt. Howard personally supervised the loading of his men and did not leave the bullet-swept landing zone until all were aboard safely.

1st Lt. Howard's gallantry in action, his complete devotion to the welfare of his men at the risk of his life were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.



http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/rlhoward.htm

Team Sergeant
12-26-2009, 10:26
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Sergeant First Class Robert Lewis Howard (ASN: RA-14628152), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control (Central), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces.
Sergeant First Class Howard distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 November 1967, as Special Forces Advisor to a joint American and Vietnamese reconnaissance patrol conducting a search mission near the Laotian border. His patrol discovered a huge rice and ammunition cache surrounded by an enemy bunker complex. Sergeant Howard led a small team to provide security while the remainder of the unit began to destroy the stored supplies. His team encountered four North Vietnamese Army soldiers, and Sergeant Howard killed them with a fierce burst of rifle fire. He and his men were immediately pinned down by a murderous curtain of fire which erupted from a nearby enemy machine gun position. With complete disregard for his safety, Sergeant Howard crawled toward the emplacement and killed a North Vietnamese sniper who was firing at him as he maneuvered. He then charged the bunker, eliminating its occupants with rifle fire. A second machine gun position unleashed a savage barrage. Sergeant Howard moved his troops to a covered location and directed an air strike against the fortified bunker. While assessing the bomb damage, Sergeant Howard was fired upon by North Vietnamese soldiers in the bunker who had survived the blasts. Pinned down directly outside the strongpoint with a blazing machine gun barrel only six inches above his head, he threw a hand grenade into the aperture of the emplacement, killing the gunners and temporarily silencing the weapon. He then dashed to his team's location and secured a light anti-tank weapon. As the enemy machine gun resumed firing, Sergeant Howard stood up amid a withering hail of bullets, fired his weapon, and completely demolished the position. His fearless and determined actions in close combat enabled the remainder of the patrol to destroy the enemy cache. Sergeant First Class Howard's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Service: Army
Rank: Sergeant First Class
Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2018 (May 2, 1968)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Robert Lewis Howard (ASN: RA-14628152), United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces.
Sergeant First Class Howard distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 12 to 20 November 1968, during an operation deep within enemy-held territory. As his platoon was being inserted into the area, it came under heavy fie from all directions. Sergeant Howard leaped from his helicopter before it touched down and began to return fire, providing protection for his men while they dismounted and moved safely off the landing zone. Seeing two enemy soldiers in a wood line, he charged their position and killed them both. When the unit was attacked by a company-size force on the night of 16 November, he went to each platoon member, encouraging them and directing their fire while completely exposing himself to the communist barrage. Two days later while Sergeant Howard was leading the point element, the platoon was ambushed by an estimated two North Vietnamese Army companies. He skillfully maneuvered his men so that the enemy was caught in a deadly crossfire and the ambush was broken. The following day, Sergeant Howard had again taken the point element when he observed an estimated battalion-size ambush. Although wounded in the initial exchange of fire, he exposed himself to the aggressors to place effective fire on them and enable his platoon to take cover. Moving from position to position, he administered first aid to the wounded and set up a landing zone so that they could be evacuated. As the first ambulance helicopter came in, it was struck by hostile machine gun fire and burst into flames. Sergeant Howard, although wounded a second time, ran one hundred and fifty meters to where the ship had crashed and rescued a trapped pilot from the blazing wreckage. Once the entire crew was free from the aircraft, he led them back to the platoon while providing covering fire. Three hours later another helicopter succeeded in landing and the casualties were evacuated, but Sergeant Howard refused to leave. The next morning, he saw three North Vietnamese soldiers maneuvering towards his element and immediately opened fire, killing them.
Service: Army
Rank: Sergeant First Class
Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 371 (February 3, 1969)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Awards and decorations
Medal of Honor
Distinguished Service Cross (with one oak leaf cluster)
Silver Star
Defense Superior Service Medal
Legion of Merit (with three oak leaf clusters)
Bronze Star (with three oak leaf clusters and "V" device)
Purple Heart (with a silver and two bronze oak leaf clusters)
Meritorious Service Medal (with two oak leaf clusters)
Air Medal (with "V" Device and numeral 3. One award for heroism and two for aerial achievement)
Joint Service Commendation
Army Commendation Medal (with "V" device and one each silver and bronze oak leaf clusters. 4 awards for valor and 3 for achievement)
Joint Service Achievement
Army Achievement
Good Conduct Medal, 4 Good Conduct Loops (4 awards)
National Defense Service Medal
Armed Forces Reserve Medal
Vietnam Service Medal
NCO Professional Development Ribbon with 2 device
Army Overseas Ribbon
Army Service Ribbon
Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, w/3 Service stars (3 awards)
Army Presidential Unit Citation, 1st Oak Leaf Cluster
Presidential Unit Citation (United States) 2001, Studies and Observations Group
Navy Unit Commendation
Army Meritorious Unit Citation
Foreign decorations
Vietnam Campaign Medal with 60 device
Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry with Gold Star (Corps citation)
Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry with Silver Star (Division citation)
Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry with Bronze Star (Regiment or Brigade citation)
Vietnam Armed Forces Honor Medal 2nd Award
Vietnam Wound Medal
Vietnam Civil Actions Medal 2nd Award
Vietnam Cross of Gallantry Unit Citation with Palm, 1st Oak Leaf Cluster (Unit citation)
Republic of Korea Order of National Security Merit (Samil Medal)

Badges, qualifications and tabs
Ranger Tab
Special Forces Tab
Combat Infantryman Badge
Aircrew Badge
Master Parachutist Badge
Pathfinder Badge
Air Assault Badge
Expert Infantryman's Badge
Vietnamese Ranger Badge
Vietnamese Master Parachute Badge
Thai Master Parachute Wings
Korean Master Parachute Badge
Thai Balloonist Badge
French Parachutist Badge

http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/rlhoward.htm

SF_BHT
12-26-2009, 10:33
Rest in Peace Sir you will be missed but never Forgotten...

JSE
01-02-2010, 19:20
I hope I am not overstepping my bounds by posting this, but I came across a lengthy interview with the late Col. Howard conducted by the Pritzker Military Library back in July of 2006. Robert Howard was a personal hero of mine and I'm saddened to learn of his passing. RIP, sir.

I believe BMT posted a link to it in the Base Camp Forum but perhaps it belongs in this thread as well: Col. Howard Interview (http://www.pritzkermilitarylibrary.org/events/2006/07-27-robert-howard.jsp).

Dexter
05-22-2010, 10:57
For those of you who are interested, the exact article written by MAJ John L. Plaster, referenced in TS' now-closed thread, "The Humble Knight: COL Robert L. Howard," is the cover story for the May 2010 edition of, "Soldier of Fortune," magazine under the title, "SOGs Most Ferocious Warrior?". COL Howard is pictured on the cover, as well as three or four times throughout the article.

I read the article to my Privates here in Iraq. I felt the next generation should know the size of the boots they and I are trying fill. I think by comparing themselves to the best, they are more likely to be challenged to excel than if they reach stagnation measuring themselves against many of the system riders in our standard Army. Anyway, one Private in particular was so moved, he spent the rest of the day reading through CMH recipient citations online. I heard him parroting the stories to others in the smoke pit at different times during the day. It pleases me to know the memory of such men, though I haven't had the honor of knowing any personally, lives on in the hearts and war stories of the Soldiers who follow; that good Soldiers never die. V/R -Dexter

Ambush Master
05-22-2010, 11:09
If that article is the one that was handed out at the Memorial Service at Bragg and at the Ceremony at Arlington, I'm the one that "Shined His Boots"!!

Bob was the best BOSS that I have ever worked for!! He covered our '6-24/7!!!

I'm glad that my youngest son got to meet him!!

Later
Martin

greenberetTFS
07-06-2010, 07:12
God Bless,Rest in Peace Warrior ...................:(

Big Teddy

Richard
10-15-2010, 09:00
For anyone who wants to know a bit about Bob Howard, leadership, and to watch and hear him tell his own story, here's a link to a program worth viewing.

Recon: Courage under Fire

http://player.theplatform.com/ps/player/pds/PVZ32iOKjb?pid=aZVtjLpzcoHawrU5ha4yLZspt4Z5mpgc

Richard :munchin

Chemist
04-30-2011, 23:44
RIP COL Howard. Your Country needs more men like you. We who know, appreciate and hold in honor your service.

THE_Onus
05-19-2011, 18:39
It would have been the biggest honor of my life to meet COL Howard. I'm glad I stumbled upon his name or else I would have never known of him.

Rest in Peace, Sir!

Dusty
05-19-2011, 19:34
It would have been the biggest honor of my life to meet COL Howard.

It was definitely mine.

Red Flag 1
05-19-2011, 20:02
For anyone who wants to know a bit about Bob Howard, leadership, and to watch and hear him tell his own story, here's a link to a program worth viewing.

Recon: Courage under Fire

http://player.theplatform.com/ps/player/pds/PVZ32iOKjb?pid=aZVtjLpzcoHawrU5ha4yLZspt4Z5mpgc

Richard :munchin

Thanks for the link Richard.

Rest In God's Peace Warrior.

RF 1

Richard
05-23-2011, 09:49
John Plaster's memorial editorial to Bob Howard.

Richard :munchin

The Humble Knight: Colonel Robert L. Howard
John Plaster, SOFMag, 12 Jul 2010
Part 1 of 2

RECON COMPANY AT COMMAND AND CONTROL CENTRAL

In 1968, Robert L. Howard was a 30-year-old sergeant first class and the most physically fit man on our compound. Broad-chested, solid as a lumberjack and mentally tough, he cut an imposing presence. I was among the lucky few Army Special Forces soldiers to have served with Bob Howard in our 60-man Recon Company at Command and Control Central, a top secret Green Beret unit that ran covert missions behind enemy lines. As an element of the secretive Studies and Observations Group (SOG), we did our best to recon, raid, attack and disrupt the enemy’s Ho Chi Minh Trail network in Laos and Cambodia.

UP THERE WITH AMERICA’S GREATEST HEROES

Take all of John Wayne’s films—throw in Clint Eastwood’s, too—and these fictions could not measure up to the real Bob Howard. Officially he was awarded eight Purple Hearts, but he actually was wounded 14 times. Six of the wounds, he decided, weren’t severe enough to be worthy of the award. Keep in mind that for each time he was wounded, there probably were ten times that he was nearly wounded, and you get some idea of his combat service. He was right up there with America’s greatest heroes—Davy Crockett, Alvin York, Audie Murphy, the inspiring example we other Green Berets tried to live up to. “What would Bob Howard do?” many of us asked ourselves when surrounded and outnumbered, just a handful of men to fight off hordes of North Vietnamese.

To call him a legend is no exaggeration. Take the time he was in a chow line at an American base and a Vietnamese terrorist on a motorbike tossed a hand grenade at them. While others leaped for cover, Howard snatched an M-16 from a petrified security guard, dropped to one knee and expertly shot the driver, and then chased the passenger a half-mile and killed him, too.
One night his recon team laid beside an enemy highway in Laos as a convoy rolled past. Running alongside an enemy truck in pitch blackness, he spun an armed claymore mine over his head like a lasso, then threw it among enemy soldiers crammed in the back, detonated it, and ran away to fight another day.

Another time, he was riding in a Huey with Larry White and Robert Clough into Laos, when their pilot unknowingly landed beside two heavily camouflaged enemy helicopters. Fire erupted instantly, riddling their Huey and hitting White three times, knocking him to the ground. Firing back, Howard and Clough jumped out and grabbed White, and their Huey somehow limped back to South Vietnam.

CONSIDER THE RESCUE OF JOE WALKER

“Just knowing Bob Howard was ready to come and get you meant a lot to us,” said recon team leader Lloyd O’Daniels. Consider the rescue of Joe Walker. His recon team and an SOG platoon had been overrun near a major Laotian highway and, seriously wounded, Walker was hiding with a Montagnard soldier, unable to move. Howard inserted a good distance away with a dozen men and, because there were so many enemy present, waited for darkness to sneak into the area. Howard felt among bodies for heartbeats, and checked one figure’s lanky legs, then felt for Joe’s signature horn-rimmed glasses. “You sweet Son of a Gun,” Walker whispered, and Howard took him to safety.

What’s all the more remarkable is that not one of these incidents resulted in any award. Howard was just doing what had to be done, he thought.

“HOPELESS” WAS NOT IN HIS VOCABULARY

Unique in American military history, this Opelika, Alabama native was recommended for the Medal of Honor three times in 13 months for separate combat actions, witnessed by fellow Green Berets. The first came in November 1967. While a larger SOG element destroyed an enemy cache, Howard screened forward and confronted a large enemy force. He killed four enemy soldiers and took out an NVA sniper. Then, “pinned down…with a blazing machine gun only six inches above his head,” he shot and killed an entire NVA gun crew at point-blank range, and then destroyed another machine gun position with a grenade. He so demoralized the enemy force that they withdrew. This Medal of Honor recommendation was downgraded to a Silver Star.

The next incident came a year later. Again accompanying a larger SOG force, he performed magnificently, single-handedly knocking out a PT-76 tank. A day later he wiped out an anti-aircraft gun crew, and afterward rescued the crew of a downed Huey. Repeatedly wounded, he was bleeding from his arms, legs, back and face, but he refused to be evacuated. Again submitted for the Medal of Honor, his recommendation was downgraded, this time to the Distinguished Service Cross.

Just six weeks later, Howard volunteered to accompany a platoon going into Laos in search of a missing recon man, Robert Scherdin. Ambushed by a large enemy force, Howard was badly wounded, his M-16 blown to bits—yet he crawled to the aid of a wounded lieutenant, fought off NVA soldiers with a grenade, then a .45 pistol, and managed to drag the officer away. Having been burned and slashed by shrapnel, we thought we’d never see him again. But he went AWOL from the hospital and came back in pajamas to learn he’d been again submitted for the Medal of Honor. This time it went forward to Washington, with assurances that it would be approved.

Howard did not know the word, “hopeless.” Many years later he explained his mindset during the Medal of Honor operation: “I had one choice: to lay and wait, or keep fighting for my men. If I waited, I gambled that things would get better while I did nothing. If I kept fighting, no matter how painful, I could stack the odds that recovery for my men and a safe exodus were achievable.”

Although eventually sent home, he came back yet again, to spend with us the final months before his Medal of Honor ceremony. By then he had served more than 5 years in Vietnam. Why so much time in Vietnam? “I guess it’s because I want to help in any way I can,” Howard explained. “I may as well be here where I can use my training; and besides, I have to do it – it’s the way I feel about my job.”

THE WARRIOR TRADITION

The warrior ethic came naturally to Bob Howard. His father and four uncles had all been paratroopers in World War Two. Of them, two died in combat and the other three succumbed to wounds after the war. To support his mother and maternal grandparents, he and his sister picked cotton. He also learned old-fashioned Southern civility, removing his hat for any lady and answering, “Yes, ma’am.”

He also possessed a deep sense of honor and justice, and lived by his unspoken warrior’s code, with the priorities mission, men, and his own interests coming last. He absolutely fit the bill as a leader you’d follow through hell’s gates – IF you could keep up with him. A hard-charging physical fitness advocate, he even had our Montagnard tribesmen running and doing calisthenics.

After draping the Medal of Honor around Howard’s neck, President Nixon asked him what he wanted to do the rest of that memorable day – lunch with the president, a tour of the White House, almost anything. Howard asked simply to be taken to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier to share his thoughts with others who had gone before him. Tragically, the U.S. media, reflecting the anti-war sentiments of that period, said not one word about Howard or his valiant deeds, although by the time he received the Medal of Honor he was America’s most highly decorated serviceman.

HIS FRAME OF REFERENCE WAS SOG—HARD COMBAT

Despite the lack of recognition, Howard went on serving to the best of his ability. He was the training officer at the Army’s Airborne School, then he was a company commander in the 2nd Ranger Battalion at Ft. Lewis, Washington. He continued to excel at everything he did, making Distinguished Honor Graduate in his Officer Advance Course class.

As the officer-in-charge of Special Forces training at Camp Mackall, near Ft. Bragg, N.C., and later, commanding the Mountain Ranger Training Camp at Dahlonega, Georgia, he did his utmost to inspire young students. Howard’s frame of reference was SOG—hard combat, the toughest kind against terrible odds with impossible missions. He knew good men would die or fail in combat without martial skills, tactical knowledge and physical conditioning. He was famous for leading runs and long-distance rucksack marches— stronger than men half his age, usually he outran entire classes of students. A whole generation of Army Special Forces and Rangers earned their qualifications under his shining example, with some graduates among the senior leaders of today’s Special Forces and Ranger units.

His highest assignment was commander of Special Forces Detachment, Korea. He might have gone higher but he dared to publicly suggest that American POWs had been left in enemy hands, and was willing to testify to that before Congress in 1986. After he retired as a full colonel, he went through multiple surgeries to try to correct the many injuries he’d suffered over the years.

But he could not stop helping GIs. He spent another 20 years with the Department of Veterans Affairs, helping disabled vets. He had a reputation for rankling his superiors as an unapologetic advocate of veterans.

(cont'd)

Richard
05-23-2011, 09:50
The Humble Knight: Colonel Robert L. Howard
John Plaster, SOFMag, 12 Jul 2010
Part 2 of 2

THIS HUMBLE KNIGHT BELONGS TO HISTORY

His spirit never waned. In 2004 I sat with Green Berets of the 1st Special Forces Group at Ft. Lewis, Wash., who laughed and cheered when he joked about still being tough enough to take on any two men in the audience—not one raised his hand. After retiring from the VA, Col. Howard often visited with American servicemen to speak about his combat experiences, making five trips to Iraq and Afghanistan. In the fall of 2009, he visited troops in Germany, Bosnia and Kosovo.

Despite increasing pain and sickness, on Veterans Day 2009 he kept his word to attend a memorial ceremony, but finally he had to seek help. He was diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer and given a few weeks to live. In those final days old Special Forces and Ranger friends slipped past “No Visitors” signs to see him. When SOG vets Ben Lyons and Martin Bennett and a civilian friend, Chuck Hendricks, visited him, Howard climbed from his bed to model the uniform jacket he would be buried in, festooned with the Medal of Honor and rows upon rows of ribbons. A proud Master Parachutist and military skydiver, he showed them the polished jump boots he’d been working on, and asked Bennett to touch up the spit shine. Though his feet might not be visible in his coffin, he wanted that shine just right.

As they left, Col. Howard thanked Bennett, and then saluted him and held his hand crisply to his eyebrow until Bennett returned it. Bob Howard passed away two days before Christmas.

This great hero, a humble knight who was a paragon for all, belongs to history now. He is survived by his daughters Denicia, Melissa and Rosslyn; an Airborne-Ranger son, Robert Jr., and four grandchildren.

http://www.sofmag.com/humble-knight-colonel-robert-l-howard

Dusty
05-23-2011, 10:49
Richard, that says it all. So cool.

dennisw
05-23-2011, 17:57
https://www.pritzkermilitarylibrary.org/Home/Medal-of-Honor-with-Ed-Tracy-3.aspx

Here's a great interview with Col. Howard which has been posted before. It's from the Pritzker Military Library.

oda751
06-27-2011, 23:53
I saw a CBS news deal about Col. Bob Howard today....He was the Co. Commander at McCall when I went thru training (phase I prior to SFAS being around)...toughest guy I ever met.

I met howard in Viet Nam in 1967-68. When I first met him he was working in the arms room at FOB#2 at SOG Kontum. Later he went on missions. Also I taught phase one when Howard was in charge of Camp McCall. I was in the 7th at the time but was sent there to run the phase one for a couple of classes. Later linked up with him at Korea in 1989-1991 and we used to tell wars stories when we a had a few to many which was often. Still have an 8x10 picture of him in my china cabinet. He was harder than woodpeckers lips when he had to be but I really liked him. There was to many students in Phase class so he took them on a run with rucksacks and as they dropped out he got the class size down to the right size and sent the dropouts packing. Boy did that cause a big stink.

Dusty
06-28-2011, 07:59
There was to many students in Phase class so he took them on a run with rucksacks and as they dropped out he got the class size down to the right size and sent the dropouts packing. Boy did that cause a big stink.


I went on one of those. :D

x SF med
06-28-2011, 10:05
Yup... went on one too... "Grab your Rucks!! We're going for a walk, girls..." :eek: That was NOT what you wanted to hear from the Major in the pre dawn light .....

wet dog
06-28-2011, 11:25
Yup, me too.

Ambush Master
08-06-2011, 11:43
The Humble Knight: Colonel Robert L. Howard
John Plaster, SOFMag, 12 Jul 2010
Part 2 of 2

THIS HUMBLE KNIGHT BELONGS TO HISTORY

Despite increasing pain and sickness, on Veterans Day 2009 he kept his word to attend a memorial ceremony, but finally he had to seek help. He was diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer and given a few weeks to live. In those final days old Special Forces and Ranger friends slipped past “No Visitors” signs to see him. When SOG vets Ben Lyons and Martin Bennett and a civilian friend, Chuck Hendricks, visited him, Howard climbed from his bed to model the uniform jacket he would be buried in, festooned with the Medal of Honor and rows upon rows of ribbons. A proud Master Parachutist and military skydiver, he showed them the polished jump boots he’d been working on, and asked Bennett to touch up the spit shine. Though his feet might not be visible in his coffin, he wanted that shine just right.

As they left, Col. Howard thanked Bennett, and then saluted him and held his hand crisply to his eyebrow until Bennett returned it. Bob Howard passed away two days before Christmas.

This great hero, a humble knight who was a paragon for all, belongs to history now. He is survived by his daughters Denicia, Melissa and Rosslyn; an Airborne-Ranger son, Robert Jr., and four grandchildren.

http://www.sofmag.com/humble-knight-colonel-robert-l-howard

The rest of this story:

When we were leaving his room, we decided to do so one by one and not all at once. I was the last..............and as I shook his hand,...........I told him that I would be looking for him at the Rally Point, just off of that Final DZ!!

That was when............HE SALUTED ME!!!

Later
Martin

mojaveman
08-06-2011, 12:29
Colonel Howard definately had a presence about him. He was gone from Mackall by the time that I got there but I saw him many mornings at the mata mile doing PT by himself.

GrumpyMedic
08-06-2011, 17:53
With a history stemming from men like Col. Howard, MSG Benividez(sp?), CPT Roger Donlon and MAJ Plaster how is it possible that we have so many whiny men in SF, or society for that matter? I realize that this is a different era and a different generation but I have men who complain about the most inconsiquential stuff, incessently. I had a few guys that got "shot at" by 2 INS from 500 meters away (with AKs, max effective range of what? 400m?) and these kids are walking around with their chests poked out! When I think about the guys I respect the most, some I've met and some I've only read about, two of the words used most often are quiet and humble. What a shame that more of our young men don't have a better understanding of true courage and spirit.
Please don't misunderstand me, I certainly fall into this category more often than I like to admit. But what's happened to us?
Sorry for venting...

Dusty
08-06-2011, 18:08
With a history stemming from men like Col. Howard, MSG Benividez(sp?), CPT Roger Donlon and MAJ Plaster how is it possible that we have so many whiny men in SF, or society for that matter? I realize that this is a different era and a different generation but I have men who complain about the most inconsiquential stuff, incessently. I had a few guys that got "shot at" by 2 INS from 500 meters away (with AKs, max effective range of what? 400m?) and these kids are walking around with their chests poked out! When I think about the guys I respect the most, some I've met and some I've only read about, two of the words used most often are quiet and humble. What a shame that more of our young men don't have a better understanding of true courage and spirit.
Please don't misunderstand me, I certainly fall into this category more often than I like to admit. But what's happened to us?
Sorry for venting...

Quit snivelling. :D

GrumpyMedic
08-07-2011, 00:06
Touchet Dusty. Message received.

Buffalobob
08-10-2011, 11:47
how is it possible that we have so many whiny men in SF, or society for that matter? I realize that this is a different era and a different generation but I have men who complain about the most inconsiquential stuff, incessently

Things haven't changed. You just weren't there to know the whiners first hand. We honor and remember those who rose above, not those who stood in the back and bitched.

THE_Onus
10-20-2011, 11:01
I'm at the USMA prep school in Alabama right now and we have the Alabama Military Hall of Honor located here on campus. COL Howard has a plaque in there and it turns out that he was my CO's great uncle. My jaw dropped when I figured both of those things out. Just something a little something I felt like sharing.

Team Sergeant
10-20-2011, 15:40
I'm at the USMA prep school in Alabama right now and we have the Alabama Military Hall of Honor located here on campus. COL Howard has a plaque in there and it turns out that he was my CO's great uncle. My jaw dropped when I figured both of those things out. Just something a little something I felt like sharing.

I can tell you that COL Howard "shared" with many of us on this website! And most of what the Colonel Howard shared with us was "pain"........;)

Richard
10-20-2011, 15:45
I can tell you that COL Howard "shared" with many of us on this website! And most of what the Colonel Howard shared with us was "pain"...

...and aggressiveness of spirit... ;)

Dusty
10-20-2011, 16:12
The man could thin a herd most ricky-tick.

greenberetTFS
10-24-2011, 07:18
For anyone who wants to know a bit about Bob Howard, leadership, and to watch and hear him tell his own story, here's a link to a program worth viewing.

Recon: Courage under Fire

http://player.theplatform.com/ps/player/pds/PVZ32iOKjb?pid=aZVtjLpzcoHawrU5ha4yLZspt4Z5mpgc

Richard :munchin

Outstanding post.........:lifter

Big Teddy :munchin

frostfire
10-30-2011, 00:43
Howard did not know the word, “hopeless.” Many years later he explained his mindset during the Medal of Honor operation: “I had one choice: to lay and wait, or keep fighting for my men. If I waited, I gambled that things would get better while I did nothing. If I kept fighting, no matter how painful, I could stack the odds that recovery for my men and a safe exodus were achievable.”

If CPL Desmond T. Doss is the embodiment of undying faith, COL Howard is one for indomitable spirit. From time to time, I'd walk to the All American Medal of Honor hall, look at the profile of these legends and reflect. Always came out with renewed resolve...

Thanks for the inspirational posts, Richard

stg
10-31-2011, 22:54
I'd like to echo those thanks.

COL Howard was my mentor's mentor. My gratitude to my mentor (and, indirectly, COL Howard) can never be fully expressed.

hharke
12-22-2011, 22:58
but he was the chief of either tower or ground branch when i went through jump school....

dayum, that was a long time ago...seems like yesterday...,.

lksteve

If that was in late 72", He was Chief of the Tower committee.

Ran across him again in 74 at B Co 75th at Ft Lewis, Ranger School in 76 and worked for him in PH1 and 3 in 81-83,

He was truely amazing and harder than chicken lips.

thesushi1413
02-07-2012, 11:36
I was assigned to CCC a few months after this action took place. (May, 1969) When I arrived, Col. (then SFC) Bob Howard was the Recon Company First Sergeant. My first impression of this man was that he was someone you always paid attention to whenever he spoke. He had a presence that made him stand out in any room, no matter how large. I was an inexperienced new guy in an organization of exceptionally professional, and ,sometimes, legendary soldiers. The SOA/SOG mission demanded a constant and elevated attention to detail and a willingness to expose oneself to additional dangers when it came to planning and execution of missions, a fact that made my head spin and my heart beat ferociously in my chest as First Sergeant Howard explained the scope of the unit's mission and my role in it at my initial in-briefing. He pulled no punches when he described what I'd be doing and where I'd be doing it. He definitely made an impression me, one that I've never forgotten. He expected much of us and I think we delivered as a unit. He was Bob Howard - how could you ever think of disappointing him?! If anyone has read this, please know that I couldn't resist commenting when I saw the post containing his MOH Citation. I'm proud to say that I served with the man, no matter how briefly, and that I will never forget him

Jay Holland
RT South Caroline
RT Ohio
B Co, Hatchet Force

Sarski
02-09-2012, 23:20
Right on, thesushi (I have huge a sushi addiction/habbit by the way).

Thank you for your service. I am certain that the high standards and demands held by Robert L. Howard continue through men like yourself, and thus his expectations and life continue through men like you. This is the path of warriors; and following in the footsteps of or serving along side warriors who lead the way.

Thus the path never ends and insures a continious life.

Thanks for sharing part of yours.

EDIT: Excuse me: Colonel Robert L. Howard.

mariley85
12-03-2013, 15:20
My uncle was a friend of the late Col. Howard, and approved of this piece I showed him.

Rest in peace, Colonel.

http://www.dmagazine.com/Home/D_Magazine/2010/July/Colonel_Robert_Howard_of_Waco_Greatest_American_He ro.aspx

Dusty
12-03-2013, 16:25
"The name Robert Lewis Howard belongs beside George Washington, John Paul Jones, Chesty Puller, Alvin York, and Audie Murphy, to name a few of the greatest."

Shoulda read "The name Robert Lewis Howard belongs at the top of a list which includes George Washington, John Paul Jones, Chesty Puller, Alvin York, and Audie Murphy, to name a few of the greatest."

It's always amazed me that no authorized bio's been written for Bad Bob.

Number one greatest Warrior in history...

Team Sergeant
12-03-2013, 18:22
Number one greatest Warrior in history...

I dunno, Audie Murphy and Alvin York and a few others are right up there too. ;)

Ambush Master
12-03-2013, 18:23
Audie Murphy and Bob were VERY close Friends!!

Dusty
12-03-2013, 18:29
I dunno, Audie Murphy and Alvin York and a few others are right up there too. ;)

I'd put Ashley, Donlon, Zab, Caviani, Benavidez, Mawhinney and Hathcock before those guys.

Also anybody who served in CCN, CCS, Project Delta or a Hatchet Co. ;)

chance
12-03-2013, 19:02
I had the Honor of meeting Col Howard, words can not describe what it was like just to be able to hear him talk. I am truly in awe of you guys that had the opportunity to work for him or with him.

Ambush Master
12-03-2013, 20:29
Also anybody who served in CCN, CCS, Project Delta or a Hatchet Co. ;)

You seem to have forgotten CCC..............Where Howard, Miller, Walker, and a few others held their own!!

Later
Martin

Dusty
12-04-2013, 05:42
You seem to have forgotten CCC..............Where Howard, Miller, Walker, and a few others held their own!!

Later
Martin

Well, it was inferred, but-you're right-I should have put that first on my list. :cool:

An entire book could be written about Doug or Joe alone...

SPEC4
11-04-2015, 10:51
:lifter

Team Sergeant
11-04-2015, 13:29
:lifter

Ha! Great picture! He almost looks........... human! ;)

nousdefions
11-04-2015, 15:53
So that's what he looks like from the front side. All I remember is the ruck..... :D

Dusty
12-22-2015, 05:10
Tomorrow's the anniversary.

RIP, Warrior.

Toaster
02-19-2016, 19:09
Today at Arlington there was a funeral and I watched the honor guard with their Caisson leaving from the funeral. Once they got to section where COL Howard is buried he rendered his salute and held it until they passed it.

He's resting in a sacred place in very good company.

There's a very helpful Arlington National Cemetery app to pinpoint the graves that you are looking for.

Dusty
02-20-2016, 06:07
Today at Arlington there was a funeral and I watched the honor guard with their Caisson leaving from the funeral. Once they got to section where COL Howard is buried he rendered his salute and held it until they passed it.

He's resting in a sacred place in very good company.

There's a very helpful Arlington National Cemetery app to pinpoint the graves that you are looking for.

One day, Bad Bob will be given proper credit.
I'm utterly disgusted at the lack of respect shown this Warrior to date.

PRB
02-20-2016, 10:57
Today at Arlington there was a funeral and I watched the honor guard with their Caisson leaving from the funeral. Once they got to section where COL Howard is buried he rendered his salute and held it until they passed it.

He's resting in a sacred place in very good company.

There's a very helpful Arlington National Cemetery app to pinpoint the graves that you are looking for.

I was unaware of that protocol.....good to know about, right and proper.
RIP Bad Bob