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Penn
11-28-2010, 19:28
This is a housing alternative I've been following for some time now. Mi esposa is especially interested in the ease of construction and the many variables (Read Green) footprint.
Has anyone here considered this avenue for housing?

http://Weehouses.com

http://weehouses.com/images_old/Black%20Friday%20X%20House.pdf

SF-TX
11-28-2010, 19:51
From the title, I thought you might be referring to one of these:

Pete
11-28-2010, 19:54
At over $200 per SF the studio design is a little pricey - but at least it's green - and on sale. But look like a red neck trailer park.

But on a serious note - high construction costs up front for "proven" green technology can save money in the long run.

Check the features and then see if any local contractors offer similar techniques and materials for a lower cost per square foot.

We're just a little too far south to make an in ground heat pump cost effective.

SF-TX
11-28-2010, 19:55
Recently saw an article on this company:

http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/

Pete
11-28-2010, 19:56
From the title, I thought you might be referring to one of these:

If you have one of those you can just use the tree.

Requiem
11-28-2010, 20:02
Has anyone here considered this avenue for housing?

Often. :)

My husband and I own remote property on Kodiak Island and plan to build on it some day. We want something with a small footprint, easy to construct, relatively cheap to transport (by barge or fishing vessel), and suitable for its extremely isolated location (no electricity, etc.). These smaller homes and cabins seem to fit most of those requirements. (Although my husband, a DIY type, will probably draw up his own plans and build it himself.)

Here's two sites I've looked at frequently:

Tumbleweed Houses (http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/houses.htm#)

Ross Chapin (http://www.rosschapin.com/Plans/plans.html)

-Susan

Dusty
11-28-2010, 20:08
Recently saw an article on this company:

http://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/

Ted Kaczynski started that movement.

SF-TX
11-28-2010, 20:08
Another source for 'wee houses:'

http://katrinacottagehousing.org/index.html

JJ_BPK
11-28-2010, 20:15
I have not looked at "WEE", but there are several "manufactured" homes in the neighborhood, built to the 150 MPH wind load standards.

They are a bit cheaper and you are limited in design to what fits on a 40 ft trailer.

But with a little imagination, you can build a very nice home. Because they are so well built, they stack easily and can be off set to accommodate porches and balconies..

If I were to build the next home, I would look at the WEE homes as an alternate to on-site stick built..

My $00.0002

:munchin

Saoirse
11-28-2010, 21:48
Thanks for the links. We have actually been looking at the yurts, decking, and the pricing for it. I actually like the yurt idea better. The "wee" houses are cute but to tiny for us. They have a good reputation as well.

JJ_BPK
11-29-2010, 07:07
This is a housing alternative I've been following for some time now. Mi esposa is especially interested in the ease of construction and the many variables (Read Green) footprint.
Has anyone here considered this avenue for housing?


I would like to separate GREEN from SMALL,, Rant on..

GREEN:

If you are building a structure that you expect to last 100 yrs, you MAY be able to recoup the additional cost to be GREEN, but it's unlikely.. Your G-kid will get the place at probate for free, so they reap the bennies and could care less..

If you want to reduce your annual costs to make the structure affordable, GREEN is not the way. All those batteries and junk on the roof are outrageously expensive so Al Gore & crowd can make bazillions..

Geo-thermal heat and air-conditioning is the only affordable GREEN technology,, and it's been around for 1000 of years.

We have a rock called No Name Key about a mile from our house, No water, No power, phones & mail were added in the last 10 yrs. In the late 50t'y the CIA used it to train for the Bay of Pig debockle,, In the 60t's it turned into a hippie & drug dealer hang-out,, still is for some, but now there are Al Gore types spending 800K for a house with no air and the water comes off the roof when in rains.

We have left leaning friends that built there 20 yrs ago, place has tonnes of batteries, solar panels, dc - ac converters,, their enclosure looks like Frankenstein's Cellar. The dam place hums like a bees nest when they want to run the microwave AND the Frigidaire.. They catch all their water off the roof,, the salt for their filtration system cost more than my monthly water bill of $25 USD.. Three yrs ago, when they retired and Kathy demanded AC, they purchased a 15KW diesel Gen Set (read $$$$$), now they have AC AND the Frigidaire,, and pay 250 a month for fuel..

They are currently very active in the NEW Greater No Name Key We Want Power Committee. Latest quote to get installation,, Bazillions..,,

http://www.npr.org/2010/11/23/131543151/tiny-fla-island-debates-joining-electric-grid

Please don't think I am against cost efficient systems,, I am very much against the AL Gore PR machine about being GREEN.. Frogs are green,, the rest are wannabes..


SMALL:

Never get small when you can have large. Out home is just short of 1200 sq ft 2BR/2BA, Plus we have a 450 sq ft lower enclosure. The day we moved in we were out of space,, still are..

If you are planing a small cottage retreat for you & momma small is good,, but after a couple months, you will be at each others throats... This is an exponential hazard if there is more than one season,, add fall and winter and you will find the storage for off season clothing becomes paramount.

Net Net, plan to build North of the 50 deg latitude and be an Inuit Fashion Plate,, or between the 24 latitudes. We picked the 24's,, closet is full of T-shirts and Shorts, & flip-flops.. Enclosure has COLD stuff so we can visit the g-kid after Labor Day or before Memorial Day...

I still need a man cave, work shop, storage for toys, and a garage.
My Lovely wife shops for fresh food daily, goes the the Library 3 times a week for TWO(@) books, and complaints about the lack of style of her flip-flops she buys at the flee market (nearest Wally-World,, 120 miles,, one-way)

We both need to drive 60 miles(round trip) to the nearest doctor of worth, several times a month.

Rocks can be as rural and remote as Wasilla..

Back to WEE and other like structures.. Given the foot print of a 40 ft semi, each unit is approximately 400 sq ft. I like modulars, you can stack or build a structure with three or four boxes and get a moderate abode.

Add a poured formed cellar for storage, shop, man-cave.. Ba Da Bing...

FOG Rant off..

:munchin

lksteve
11-29-2010, 09:34
I would like to separate GREEN from SMALL,, Rant on..

GREEN:

If you are building a structure that you expect to last 100 yrs, you MAY be able to recoup the additional cost to be GREEN, but it's unlikely.. Your G-kid will get the place at probate for free, so they reap the bennies and could care less..You neglected to mention that the definition of Green will change before you pay for the house...in the mid 70s, when I was in college after my first enlistment, the major environmental concern was global cooling...:rolleyes:

That said, I have looked at purchasing a smaller, more efficient home...with just me and the dog, it makes sense...the problem is I want a small house and a three car garage...that seems to be a sticking point...

The Reaper
11-29-2010, 09:46
Bigger house, better insulation and energy efficiency.

Done living in a crackerbox and making rental payments on a big storage space. $50 per month for storage is $6,000 every ten years.

TR

craigepo
11-29-2010, 11:28
$200 per square foot is really, really expensive, at least in comparison to the prices here in Missouri.

While our building practices here are generally at the other end of the spectrum from what might be considered "green", there are a few trends people are following that are helping out with building/operating a home.

1. Most people pour a basement, instead of building on a foundation or concrete pad. For a little extra money, you get 2X the amount of living space in the home.

2. Folks are now pouring their basement using foam insulating concrete forms. While a basement is naturally insulated, the foam forms are left in place, and greatly increase the R-value of the basement walls.

3. Passive solar heating: By facing the large windows south, the home is partially heated by the sun in the winter. In the summer, the sun is too far overhead to have the same effect in the rooms.

4. Tankless water heaters. An old idea, but heating water only when necessary saves a ton of energy/money. One caveat for this area: make sure the tankless water heater comes with a flush valve. Local water is very hard, and the heater needs to be flushed every six months-one year to get rid of lime buildup.

5. Geothermal heat pumps: my sister built a 3,000 square foot house, and heats/cools the entire home for about $1.00 per day. More expensive to start with, but the payoff period is relatively short.

Gypsy
11-29-2010, 18:38
That said, I have looked at purchasing a smaller, more efficient home...with just me and the dog, it makes sense...the problem is I want a small house and a three car garage...that seems to be a sticking point...

Buy a garage and build an apartment above it.

lksteve
11-29-2010, 18:39
Buy a garage and build an apartment above it.There are days when my right leg doesn't do stairs...

Gypsy
11-29-2010, 18:43
There are days when my right leg doesn't do stairs...


Ah, yes...my left knee is sometimes annoying that way.

mojaveman
11-29-2010, 21:19
They're kinda cute, something like the miniture houses that the Germans build in their gardens outside of the city.

Penn
11-30-2010, 06:06
Craigpo, Tx, everyone. I am considering 6 - 40/50'x10'x10' containers stacked and off set, to create roof decks and porches below.
Site selection Pa/Bucks county. rural, but accessible. Southern exposure near the Delaware river.
Fit out: modern industrial-A/C,electric conduit, exposed, but all piping is tight with 90^ turns etc.
Bathroom and water source fixtures centralized, as in down stairs bathroom built behind kitchen on first floor, would stack bathrooms above on second.

Container cost: $2100.00 @

Like the idea of a cellar.
Garage is another container or two.

What appeals to me is the Box as a modular system.

In that sense all pieces for the puzzle are prefabbed, windows, doors, even whole molded bathrooms.

Basically, it's the conex's most of you have use down range, just not with Pella windows, and some grads school wannbe architects resourcing the finishes for portfolio credits.

I think I can put this together for under $40per sq/ft after set up cost-land, boxes.

Any suggestions -wood burning stoves, water salvage, etc would be great.

One other thought: I am not thinking spartan existence. I'm thinking no clutter, little to maintained, (painting, pointless yard work) open living space - studio/work/live space 3000-sq/ft

Sourcing- I am a devout, but discriminating auction attendee-recently witnessed a 6mo old 10 ton ac unit sold of the roof a closed restaurant for $800.00!!!!!

JJ_BPK
11-30-2010, 06:27
If you can do that for 40 usd @ sq ft,, I want your play book..

Suggestions:

1)I am not a fan of IKEA and WEE seems to reply heavily on them. We do like Scandinavian design for it's simple lines and we have a bunch of teak..

2)Sooo much glass,, I fear in a Northern climate that it will not hold the heat,, and in the summer it will cook you. Placement on site will be paramount. We have learned that facing a home to catch the fading sunset is a no-no.. The sun at low angles acts like a solar furnace. Face you glass to the East or ESE to limit cooking the inhabitance.. They will be happy with your decision..

3)Heating/Cooling,, oversize is better. From the AC unit to the ducting. Larger volume is quieter and has less flow restrictions. If you go for the loft effect with exposed ducting, be sure the HVAC guy does a very thorough job of balancing the air flow over the different units. We have a couple friends that have tried to use the wall mounted AC/heat units and failed. They do not move the volume of air to effectively do the job.

4)Containers.. The IBM site in Austin Tx is clad in raw steel.. It is not painted, but was left to rust, Works well, Been there for 40 some yrs..

Good Luck..

:munchin

TOMAHAWK9521
11-30-2010, 11:47
I tried looking at smaller, earth-friendly homes but I just couldn't seem to get comfortable in there. Not to mention it was a real fixer-upper. It's in a cozy neighborhood, though. :D

mojaveman
11-30-2010, 11:52
I tried looking at smaller, earth-friendly homes but I just couldn't seem to get comfortable in there. Not to mention it was a real fixer-upper. It's in a cozy neighborhood, though. :D

The Maginot line?

Sigaba
11-30-2010, 12:02
Entire postChef Penn--

If you do proceed, and if you're so inclined, please do take and post photos of the WEE's installation.:lifter

mojaveman
11-30-2010, 12:05
Craigpo, Tx, everyone. I am considering 6 - 40/50'x10'x10' containers stacked and off set, to create roof decks and porches below.
Site selection Pa/Bucks county. rural, but accessible. Southern exposure near the Delaware river.
Fit out: modern industrial-A/C,electric conduit, exposed, but all piping is tight with 90^ turns etc.
Bathroom and water source fixtures centralized, as in down stairs bathroom built behind kitchen on first floor, would stack bathrooms above on second.

Container cost: $2100.00 @

Like the idea of a cellar.
Garage is another container or two.

What appeals to me is the Box as a modular system.

In that sense all pieces for the puzzle are prefabbed, windows, doors, even whole molded bathrooms.

Basically, it's the conex's most of you have use down range, just not with Pella windows, and some grads school wannbe architects resourcing the finishes for portfolio credits.

I think I can put this together for under $40per sq/ft after set up cost-land, boxes.

Any suggestions -wood burning stoves, water salvage, etc would be great.

One other thought: I am not thinking spartan existence. I'm thinking no clutter, little to maintained, (painting, pointless yard work) open living space - studio/work/live space 3000-sq/ft

Sourcing- I am a devout, but discriminating auction attendee-recently witnessed a 6mo old 10 ton ac unit sold of the roof a closed restaurant for $800.00!!!!!

As I live not far from the Port of Long Beach where sea containers are available and affordable I've seen some pretty creative things done with them. One client of ours poured a slab, placed four containers on it, built a roof with conventional trusses and plywood, installed windows, plastered the outside, and then cut the inside walls out. From the outside it looked like a regular house. Did the whole thing for less than 40K. Positioned at the back of the property they make nice workshops too.

wet dog
11-30-2010, 12:22
My husband and I own remote property on Kodiak Island and plan to build on it some day. We want something with a small footprint, easy to construct, relatively cheap to transport (by barge or fishing vessel), and suitable for its extremely isolated location (no electricity, etc.). These smaller homes and cabins seem to fit most of those requirements. (Although my husband, a DIY type, will probably draw up his own plans and build it himself.)
-Susan

Susan, why not build an entire village.

1stindoor
11-30-2010, 13:33
For the wood burning stove idea...I had a friend whose mother had one in North Texas. She cooked on it most of the time through the winter. Worked really great for heating the home, but the biggest downside to it is it takes a while to cool down and can actually make the interior of a well insulated house a bit too warm for comfort.

Requiem
11-30-2010, 17:25
Wet Dog, sir,

Er... what the heck is that? :D

No offense, but I'd rather not have your village here:

(Although hunters are welcome. :) )

-Susan

Dusty
11-30-2010, 17:52
I tried looking at smaller, earth-friendly homes but I just couldn't seem to get comfortable in there. Not to mention it was a real fixer-upper. It's in a cozy neighborhood, though. :D

lol:D

TOMAHAWK9521
11-30-2010, 19:44
lol:D

Ah! You recognized Bag End! :D

I visited the quaint little spot while traveling around NZ back '05. Yeah, I'm a geek at heart.

DJ Urbanovsky
12-03-2010, 14:53
I am in the planning and $ estimate stage of building a container home myself, Penn.

Approximate worst case estimate to finish out the interior of a single 40" high cube is $2128.99 (not counting tax).

That's if you DIY and you've already got all the necessary tools.

That figure doesn't include the price of the container, or any doors, windows, plumbing, paint, HVAC, your electrical service or lighting fixtures, or any reinforcement you'd have to do to structure if you're cutting holes in the walls (the walls on containers provide structural integrity).

Figure does include all the wiring runs for eight GFI outlets, four wall switches, fire resistant drywall, all studs 18" on center, full R38 insulation, poplar baseboards, tongue and groove wood floors, and six 6'x1' reinforced concrete pilings, and all the consumables like screws, nails, joint compound, and construction adhesive.

Add another $2K (again worst case) for the actual container and you're at $4128.99. That's less than $13/SQ FT. Of course, you've gotta buy the land to put it on, your price is going to go up for plumbing and HVAC, and there's all the sweat equity... But still.

They're designed to be stacked eight on one... Great for structure!







Craigpo, Tx, everyone. I am considering 6 - 40/50'x10'x10' containers stacked and off set, to create roof decks and porches below.
Site selection Pa/Bucks county. rural, but accessible. Southern exposure near the Delaware river.
Fit out: modern industrial-A/C,electric conduit, exposed, but all piping is tight with 90^ turns etc.
Bathroom and water source fixtures centralized, as in down stairs bathroom built behind kitchen on first floor, would stack bathrooms above on second.

Container cost: $2100.00 @

Like the idea of a cellar.
Garage is another container or two.

What appeals to me is the Box as a modular system.

In that sense all pieces for the puzzle are prefabbed, windows, doors, even whole molded bathrooms.

Basically, it's the conex's most of you have use down range, just not with Pella windows, and some grads school wannbe architects resourcing the finishes for portfolio credits.

I think I can put this together for under $40per sq/ft after set up cost-land, boxes.

Any suggestions -wood burning stoves, water salvage, etc would be great.

One other thought: I am not thinking spartan existence. I'm thinking no clutter, little to maintained, (painting, pointless yard work) open living space - studio/work/live space 3000-sq/ft

Sourcing- I am a devout, but discriminating auction attendee-recently witnessed a 6mo old 10 ton ac unit sold of the roof a closed restaurant for $800.00!!!!!

Penn
12-03-2010, 15:41
DJ, tx for the info. Are you building yours for commercial use, or live work?

Another thought is to bury the units; resolving the HVAC issue.

DJ Urbanovsky
12-03-2010, 16:58
To live in. :D

There are a lot of details that need to be sorted out before I actually move forward. Location, building codes, building inspectors, and I'm sure I'll need to have an engineer or architect to sign off on the plans. Right now I'm still figuring out my design and floor plan and crunching numbers for construction materials. Hell, for that matter, I'm still trying to decide how much house we want!

Because the containers are wind and water tight, you don't want to go punching a bunch of holes in them attaching studs for the interior framing. One option is 2x4 studs and liquid nails. Another is welding in steel studs for the framing. Steel studs will be a bit more expensive - about a buck more per stud.

Buried installations are an interesting idea, but then you've gotta contend with corrosion. For this reason, you really don't want to set your container directly on the ground - it should be at least slightly elevated on a foundation or on pilings. These containers are rated at (IIRC) 65,000lbs, and are designed to carry the load on all four corners, so you really only need four pilings per container. I guess if you wanted to bury it, you could coat the whole thing in tar, though.

Like I said, I've still got a lot of research to do on this. I'd be happy to share anything I've got so far.


DJ, tx for the info. Are you building yours for commercial use, or live work?

Another thought is to bury the units; resolving the HVAC issue.

JJ_BPK
12-21-2010, 07:12
This is an interesting twist.

Not so much that someone can weld some plates into a shelter..

But that they found a source for hi-quality plate steel,, at the salvage ship yards..

If you live near a salvage operation, you may be able to get some nice plate material to make a safe room,, or ???

Interesting possibilities... :munchin


http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/12/indestructible-mobile-home-keeps-out-mad-max-zombies

Indestructible Mobile Home Keeps Out Mad Max, Zombies, Charlie Sorrel,
December 20, 2010

sinjefe
12-21-2010, 07:37
JJ,

Where did you get the picture of Dusty's house?:)

JJ_BPK
02-23-2011, 06:48
JJ,

Where did you get the picture of Dusty's house?:)

eBay,, of course... :D

Penn if your still in the debating phase??

While looking for STUFF, I stumbled across these containers that may be a partial solution to your quest??

http://cgi.ebay.com/10-8-Guard-Booth-Office-Container-Great-Condition-/110425974307?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19b5e6a623

http://cgi.ebay.com/8-40-OFFICE-CONTAINER-EXCELLENT-CONDITION-/110586178461?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19bf732b9d

http://cgi.ebay.com/8-40-STEEL-STORAGE-CONTAINER-ROLL-UP-DOOR-/110586178475?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19bf732bab

SF-TX
02-23-2011, 07:50
Another option is a pre-fab or custom metal building. I know some ranchers that have built barns/shops and finished out a section for living using metal buildings.

http://www.muellerinc.com/gallery/building/thechoiceseries18/choice18_h.jpg.php

http://www.muellerinc.com/building/prefab_kits.php

http://www.muellerinc.com/index.php

Dusty
02-23-2011, 07:57
JJ,

Where did you get the picture of Dusty's house?:)

I wish! We ain't got no inside plumbin' yet...

JJ_BPK
02-23-2011, 08:23
Interesting thread, why are so many of you folk interested in living in such a tiny space? I don't personally particularly care for the "Wee" houses because they just look too cold (and I don't mean temperature-wise), there is nothing homely about them.

There are as many reasons as... :D

Penn
02-23-2011, 08:49
TX-JJ & SF, they are good options, especially the barn configurations; and Broad that is your answer; its anything, but confined space. If you do the math $+per/sqft
a 10X10X40 sq/ft base is 2k which works out to $5 per/sqft for basic shelter. Options are endless, but for a modern approach to: think of Mies Van der Glass house, or the "Farnsworth House", its an amazing opportunity. Combined with passive solar and its a no brainer.

Edit to add:http://www.solar.arch.vt.edu/
http://www.lumenhaus.com/index2.html
http://www.farnsworthhouse.org/lumenhaus.htm

JJ_BPK
03-29-2012, 05:28
Penn,,

Any updates??

I was reading this article and it got me thinking..

Boulder Couple Builds 125 Square-Foot House

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/30765076/detail.html

And it's on wheels..

:munchin

Richard
03-29-2012, 05:55
I am a fan of Gaudi's architectural concepts and I've actually been thinking about trying something like this.

Richard :munchin

Low Impact Woodland Home

http://loveforlife.com.au/node/5917

Penn
03-29-2012, 06:34
JJ, we are currently looking for a small farm 20 ac+/- in Upper Bucks County, Pa. I want to find a secluded hill/home sight and entrench the containers in the side of the hill with a southern exposure. Three 40 X 10 containers for 1200Sq/ft live work space and farm above, invisible below. This is what we settled on as an idea to develop, until the following occurred.

Due to the nature of my business, I have had the opportunity to correspond with a world renown Architect in the Princeton. He was schedule to meet with his staff, and I could not be there that day to take care of the group, so I wrote him a note extending my apologies and ask for him to autograph his book, a first edition, which has been in my possession since it was published. It was well thumbed through with page notations and comments as they surfaced in my mind, they were short, quick +/- on the buildings, or designs.

At any rate, he drew a site plan based on the contents of my note, which included my obsession with shipping containers, covering the two blank inside pages. He included his signature objects in the field as well as a studio/living environment, and he signed the drawing. It's actually, quite incredible.

The problem now is we love the drawing, but its not an efficient use of capital, nor does it conform to the the environment in the way the inverse bank barn of shipping containers do.

Whats the phrase, and so it goes?

PSM
03-29-2012, 14:04
Given the foot print of a 40 ft semi, each unit is approximately 400 sq ft. I like modulars, you can stack or build a structure with three or four boxes and get a moderate abode.

Add a poured formed cellar for storage, shop, man-cave.. Ba Da Bing...

FOG Rant off..

:munchin

JJ,

This is what we did/are doing. We down-sized 50% to 1200 sq ft. (But, the garage is also 1200 sq ft :D) We went modular and took a 3 bedroom floor plan, shrunk one into an office (my wife telecommutes) and found room for a large walk-in pantry. We're on a 3' block foundation. At the moment, we are building a 10' redwood covered deck on three sides and 12' on the back. To give us more room we added a "mud-room" between the house and garage. This is where the washer, dryer, HWH, and freezer are. The house was built with 2x6s and is very well insulated. It was built in about 2 month. OTOH, the site-built garage took 8 months and the deck 4 months.

We are totally off-grid by necessity, not choice. You're right about the cost of being "green". While the well was only $7,000, the solar was $42,500. There are tax credits, but we haven't found out how much they will help yet. I didn't count on them, though.

It's been frustrating at times, but I'm enjoying our new back yard. ;)

Pat

JJ_BPK
03-29-2012, 14:37
I am Sooo jealous of you guys that can even think about building INTO the ground, or even ON the ground. We are 10 ft up OFF the ground.

Hopefully by the end of the yr we will be heading to North Florida. Hoping to find some high ground inland. We are not doing Preppers, but quiet and country,, and near the big city stuff, like Disney, airports, & medical...

I would love to see some of these plans you guys are cooking??

Penn
03-29-2012, 18:07
This is a current project, I will upload it and then attach the budget as an example of build out for any project.
This is a current project, I will upload it and then attach the budget as an example of build out for any Restaurant project. I am usually the GC for the project. These are pictures before the demo.

Total sq/ft including outside dinning and basement storage 1000sq/ft.
Budget with all work outsourced. I supply all material needed.
Painting contractor is responsible for power washing and then painting the building both inside and out for $650.00
License Electric contractor is responsible for installing low voltage track lighting, hang fixtures and hookup all equipment. He also will run what ever lines are needed. $ 500. 00 per day; to date he has work ed one day and estimates he needs one, possibly 2 to complete the job.
Plumbing contractor is responsible for refitting the design, estimate $4700.00. Has one day of work remaining.
Mechanical engineer drawings for hood duct work, stainless steel panels, and fire suppression system: $5600.00
Architect fees: $750.00
Demo cost: $0
Total to date:12.5K

Golf1echo
03-30-2012, 06:16
The Japanese have been doing good work with smaller foot prints and have some innovative ideas such as developing very small foot prints for business and housing. They even lease air rights where they will build you an office space above a parking area for a time frame, when you are done they disassemble it and re market the space to the next user.

I have built a few smaller buildings and find they can be very efficient, using passive solar heat effectively as well as being easier to cool.

Hope this link to images works...http://www.google.com/search?q=japanese+micro+architecture&hl=en&client=firefox-a&hs=t6G&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&prmd=imvns&source=lnms&tbm=isch&ei=YKJ1T7mZEYym8QT6_uySBA&sa=X&oi=mode_link&ct=mode&cd=2&ved=0CA4Q_AUoAQ&biw=1366&bih=622


Just returned from Fairbanks Alaska where small cabins historically were in common use.

TF Kilo
03-30-2012, 20:47
This is an interesting twist.

Not so much that someone can weld some plates into a shelter..

But that they found a source for hi-quality plate steel,, at the salvage ship yards..

If you live near a salvage operation, you may be able to get some nice plate material to make a safe room,, or ???

Interesting possibilities... :munchin

Yeah, until someone hooks a hose from their car exhaust to the smokestack.

JJ_BPK
04-21-2012, 10:58
Just read an interesting article about using containers for a BSA camp.
Looks like it would be a great back yard project with multiple uses.

http://www.jetsongreen.com/2010/02/eco-cabin-shipping-container-camp-emerald-bay.html

:lifter

Penn
04-21-2012, 14:04
How cool is that!!!

DIYPatriot
09-21-2012, 12:07
Check it out, Penn...

Hari and Karl Berzins decided to build a tiny home for their family in Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains to free themselves of the financial burden of owning a large home. They knew that moving two children, a dog and a cat into a 168-square foot space would be a challenge, though it would also eliminate the need for a mortgage and cut their utility costs....

I've seen several small/wee houses popping up along the gulf coast over the past couple of years. I intended to take some pics of the ones near our hotel last week, but S&R really isn't my thing, especially while the occupants were there 24/7...not too sure how welcomed I would've been had I shown up snapping random photos uninvited. Knowing my luck, it would've been TS on vacation and the only flash he would've returned would've been from his .45 :D

Story w/photos here (http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/21/living/small-homes-irpt/index.html?hpt=hp_c1)

Penn
04-21-2015, 17:22
We think this will work for us. We will add a third container for two more BR and a shared bath. Click on Insta House

http://www.mbarchitecture.com/container-studio/13cly87gcbev4d4dksamkysveo68bo

SF_BHT
04-21-2015, 17:37
We think this will work for us. We will add a third container for two more BR and a shared bath. Click on Insta House

http://www.mbarchitecture.com/container-studio/13cly87gcbev4d4dksamkysveo68bo

The big thing with using a container is you have to have a good covering for a roof or they rust out over time. They are good building blocks. Peru, Ecuador and Chile has been doing this for years.

I think Tiny Homes needs a office near Bragg and call them Divorce Homes. Pull up put your shit in them and drive off and find a new place to park. Those would have been a god send many years ago.;)

Penn
01-04-2018, 18:06
Way out there and accessible.

https://www.tenfoldengineering.com/#section-applications

Make sure you scroll down.

sfshooter
01-04-2018, 19:08
I must say, that is pretty damn nifty!

cbtengr
01-16-2018, 06:27
These look like a good option for a tiny home, the price certainly seems reasonable. If you are the least bit handy you should be able to build one yourself.


http://www.wideopencountry.com/prefab-arched-cabins-provide-cozy-homes-for-under-10k/?utm

34644

tonyz
01-16-2018, 08:34
These look like a good option for a tiny home, the price certainly seems reasonable. If you are the least bit handy you should be able to build one yourself.


http://www.wideopencountry.com/prefab-arched-cabins-provide-cozy-homes-for-under-10k/?utm

34644

Those look interesting. Add a ductless mini-spilt in a warm climate and in many instances you'd be GTG for a little get away.

Team Sergeant
01-16-2018, 15:41
These look like a good option for a tiny home, the price certainly seems reasonable. If you are the least bit handy you should be able to build one yourself.


http://www.wideopencountry.com/prefab-arched-cabins-provide-cozy-homes-for-under-10k/?utm

34644


Even been in a tin/medal roof house when the hail was falling? Or even rain?

:rolleyes:

cbtengr
01-16-2018, 16:08
Even been in a tin/medal roof house when the hail was falling? Or even rain?

:rolleyes:

Ft Leonard Wood, MO AIT 1975, open bay quonset. No Snowflakes and no women. But lots of pot smokin and Earth Wind and Fire. My first dose of reality.

tonyz
01-16-2018, 16:15
You're a shining star
No matter who you are
Shining bright to see
What you could truly be (what you could truly be)

Rain on metal roofs can be soothing...now hail is another story.

SF_BHT
01-16-2018, 17:00
Even been in a tin/medal roof house when the hail was falling? Or even rain?

:rolleyes:

hail will drive you bat shit but the rain puts me to sleep like a baby

PSM
01-16-2018, 18:04
Even been in a tin/medal roof house when the hail was falling? Or even rain?

:rolleyes:

I wondered about that as we are considering putting a metal roof on our place. We don't get much hail and the rain would just drown out my tinnitus. ;)

Pat

sfshooter
01-16-2018, 19:18
I wondered about that as we are considering putting a metal roof on our place. We don't get much hail and the rain would just drown out my tinnitus. ;)

Pat

I have a metal roof and with decent insulation it's not bothersome in the rain. You can definitely tell when it is hailing though!

PSM
01-16-2018, 19:31
I have a metal roof and with decent insulation it's not bothersome in the rain. You can definitely tell when it is hailing though!

Thanks. We're well insulated, too, because of the heat. Come to think about it we don't get much rain either. :D

doctom54
01-16-2018, 20:43
hail will drive you bat shit but the rain puts me to sleep like a baby

I concur. I like rain on a tin roof.