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Gold Eagle
10-10-2010, 07:51
Anyone with low recoil experience? My old shoulder might enjoy some of these! Does anyone know the difference in effect on the target (home defense) as opposed to full power 2 3/4 loads? Thanks.

The Reaper
10-10-2010, 11:32
Anyone with low recoil experience? My old shoulder might enjoy some of these! Does anyone know the difference in effect on the target (home defense) as opposed to full power 2 3/4 loads? Thanks.

It would appear to be pretty obvious that fewer pellets and lower velocity means less damage to the target.

Having said that, if you put 8 #00 Buck pellets into a guy's head from 20 feet instead of 12, I am not sure that he will be able to tell the difference.

There ain't no such thing as a free lunch.

TR

Blitzzz (RIP)
10-10-2010, 11:37
I loaded some 2.75" hulls with #6 shot and less powder than recommended ( I'll check the numbers later). The recoil was near pleasant and I got a pretty good grouping at 100 meters. I was just trying something a little different. Seemed to be ok.

Gold Eagle
10-11-2010, 16:18
Blitzzz, Are you sure that was 100 meters or 10 meters? Thanks guys.

Blitzzz (RIP)
10-11-2010, 16:34
I thought I was chronying my slugs and fired five through the Chrony at the 100 meter target. It wasn't until I walked down to the target (because I couldn't see any slug holes in the target.) and saw the pattern of shot in the chest area of the target. About 80% of the pellets were in about a 1ft circle with a few up in the throat and shoulders. I don't understand it, other than the possibility of the decreased velocity may not have spread the shot much.
I honestly don't know.
Over wad on top of Nickle plated shot. I still have some of that batch and may try it again. Truly unbelievable I Know. If it's consistent, I'll break some down and take accurate weight measures of shot and powder.

swpa19
10-12-2010, 10:50
Back in the day when I was an avid shotgun shooter (6 nights a week) We would shoot "games" for $$. It is not uncommon to break a clay target at 100+meters. This is using (in my personal case) Federal 2.75 paper hulls with Federal two piece wad, ounce and an eighth of shot and 19.5 gr. 700X or Remington plastic hulls with "Power Piston" wads, ounce and an eigth of shot and 21.5 to 23 gr. of Red Dot. These were with 71/2 shot in the Federals and 6s in the Remington Plastics. Keeping in mind, the choke was a deciding factor also.

Here is some additional info on "Low Recoil" Buck:http://www.shotgunworld.com/bbs/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=222033&start=0
As far as pattern and recoil goes, I believe them to be secondary. Its penetration that is the deciding factor.

frostfire
10-17-2010, 21:56
Anyone with low recoil experience? My old shoulder might enjoy some of these! Does anyone know the difference in effect on the target (home defense) as opposed to full power 2 3/4 loads? Thanks.

I recently did some grouping/pattern test with Hornady LE TAP 2 3/4 70mm 12 ga 00 buck/low recoil (at least that's what the shell/box say)s. All shots torso size at 45 yards. IIRC, at that distance they split to 6 top/center and 2 bottom. Weird. At 25 yards, all 8 about 1.5 palm size. My shoulder felt more recoil shooting skeet load than these.

Can't answer the effect on target question.

Ambush Master
10-17-2010, 22:19
Air.177 has one of these and he knocked down Pepper-Poppers with Bird-Shot loads that folks shooting Buck-Shot weren't taking down. True, well disciplined Shot Placement had a lot to do with it, but the Vang Barrel is THE HEAT!!!

Well worth the money!! https://vangcomp.com/Home.html

Later
Martin

craigepo
10-17-2010, 22:58
I have had some really bad experience with "low recoil" shotgun rounds. Keep in mind that "low recoil" also means "low velocity". This decrease in shotgun rounds is more pronounced in shotguns than rifles, as shotgun loads are very
heavy, not aerodynamic, and begin to spread and drop as soon as they leave the end of the muzzle.

If you are shooting paper or clay pigeons, this is not a big deal. However, living stuff that you might shoot with a shotgun sometimes needs to be hit hard, as it doesn't always know that it is supposed to die just because you pulled a trigger.

One other consideration: if you are shooting an autoloading shotgun, "low recoil" may give your gun a problem cycling. The result will be that you get one shot, then you get to work the action by hand. My Benelli will shoot light bird loads pretty well; my old Beretta really had problems with them.