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Pete
09-27-2010, 14:08
I searched and saw where CrossFit is mentioned in a number of threads on the board.

This week's Army Times

"The hidden danger of CrossFit"

"Military doctors sound the alarm over 'rhabdo' " pg 4 in the Off Duty section.

I think the concern in the story is over "Intense regimens" and rhabdomyolsis.

MILON
09-28-2010, 10:21
I haven't posted for a while, but this story intrigued me and there is more information out there regarding Crossfit and Rhabdo. Just google it. Crossfit has a couple articles in their journal as well, so even they have recognized it as a possibility. After reading their articles I didnt get the sense it was a significant problem, which I found odd, but not surprising. Frankly, when I read about this I was a little shocked. I have been strength coaching at the college level for around 5 years (volunteer, grad assistant, head) and I've NEVER heard of this being discussed in that area of work. Its simply never happened within the strength and conditioning circle I am involved in or outside of it that I know of. It made sense to me, however, in relation to crossfit. I think SF718 is right and crossfit's effectiveness cannot be disputed. Injuries do happen in the weight room and/or PT field, but there is a huge difference between strains, sprains, bumps and bruises and a conditioning that is potentially lethal! Personally, I believe proper oversight is the key here and we cannot completely blame crossfit OR its costumers. Its not hard to get a personal training certificate these days even though you dont really know what you are doing. How many guys/gals have you spoke to who read muscle magazine think they are qualified to give you training advice? I've also seen strength coaches out there who have high levels of education make some pretty stupid errors. We can also say that the client should be smarter (like driving to work in the morning), but the fact remains that the "smart" approach to training isnt always promoted. A puking clown comes to mind here... Crossfit is a highly intense and driven routine with questionable oversite that promotes a never quit attitude, from what I have seen. I believe there would likely be fewer cases of rhabdo from crossfit had proper coaching/supervision been present during their sessions.

Anevolution
09-28-2010, 12:25
As far as there certification goes, I think that they are attempting to tighten up there certification process by implementing written tests and certifications that expire after a certain period.
Maybe they can put a disclaimer explaining the risks higher on the webpage?

Correct sir. They are starting to do tests and have in the past few months failed a few people. :eek: I just did a Crossfit endurance cert and it was instructed a lot better than my level 1. I believe they are trending in a better direction then in the past. Everyone should just keep in mind people who do Crossfit type work outs, don’t DO Crossfit. Formal training in the Olympic lifts is a must.The bodyweight wods are fine, but when you start putting 175 over head the game changes.

V/r
Anevolution

Hammock
09-28-2010, 14:49
I began doing Crossfit about a month ago to help recover from a leg fracture. Alarmed by the article, I did a bit of research to try to find out what kind of horrible workout gave the sailor rhabdo.

Here is the workout that led to the lawsuit that is mentioned in the article:

“Makimba”
Three rounds, one each of 15-10-5 reps, for time, of:
Dumbbell Thrusters with 10 lbs
Air Squats
Burpees

http://media.crossfit.com/cf-video/MakimbaPkg.pdf

If that workout nearly killed a man, the circumstances are an aberration so far outside normal experience--like a freak accident--that it is nearly irrelevant to my training.

Hammock

kawaishi
09-28-2010, 18:52
I've been working out at a gym since January that does some CF and I've enjoyed it. The gym is run by a former 1st Force Recon Marine who left the Corps, became a pro triathlete, and had been coaching athletes for over a decade before opening the gym. I only mention that because his background in Recon and his own athletic/coaching experience gives him a good knowledge of applying athletic training to a military based goal. Alot of my opinions reflect knowledge that he (and my college judo coach) shared with me. He holds SF Soldiers in very high regard so he's got some grey matter, right?. :D

I've experienced some great benefits from CF but many of the CF'ers that I know don't do any other kind of resistance training. I think that's wrong.

First, there is no periodization to the training and, while CF produces results, periodization of training programs has been proven to be the best way to develop a solid, all-around athlete. The arguement I've heard by CF'ers is that jobs like firefighting, law enforcement, and military service have "general" and "random" requirements that don't stress max strength or max speed like athletes. What I'm missing is how CF is random. Everything is for time which means that your heart rate is elevated as you race through at your best pace. That's great conditioning but it produces a certain kind of adaptation even if the exercises are varied. Also, your body will adapt and respond to training so why waste that adaptation by doing random programs that don't build on your success with structure?

Second, the circuit training format doesn't allow for true strength training that is so beneficial to athletic performance. While CF will make you somewhat stronger there is no substitute for lifting near max weight. I use CF but in my endurance-conditioning phase after I've focused on Strength and Power. Guess what? Now I'm using heavier weights for the same CF routines....oh, and I'm running alot faster after all those heavy squats! :lifter

Some of the best info that I've seen about periodization is by Tudor Bompa. I recommend his books to everyone.

CF is a great conditioning tool and but its one tool in the toolbox. I will continue to use a CF style workout but as a compliment to a progressive and balanced routine.

BigJimCalhoun
09-28-2010, 21:54
I was doing crossfit but did not fit with "the culture of the local training facility". Aside from being cliquey, which I could deal with, they repeatedly played loud rap music with lyrics about raping women. I know other facilities most likely do not play that sort of music but given I was spending $150/month for myself and my son, I thought I could spend my money more wisely.

Though I like crossfit exercises, I like mtnathlete.com and militaryathlete.com better and used to visit them when Rob posted the workouts for free.

kawaishi
09-29-2010, 00:33
Broadsword2004, yes it was Cross Fit and there is one other Cross Fit place in town. The one that I'm at actually ended up disassociating with CrossFit. The owner was concerned with alot of pop-up "Cross Fit" gyms around the country and what he may end up being associated with. He's a serious athletic trainer who know's his business very well and, personally, I think that he did not want people to believe he was legit because they saw Cross Fit on his door. He's an accomplished guy who wants to have clients see the value in his knowledge and experience instead of someone else's brand name.

I didn't mean to step on your toes if you like Cross Fit; however, I'm sticking with traditional periodization because it's better for me.

SF718 said something that really made sense to me as to why I believe what I do....knowing where your body is, your limitations, and your individual goals. Cross Fit, while being useful, doesn't address what I need and what I'm going to do. I can make my own training plan better based on sound training principles because I know my goals. I'm working on raw strength so I'm doing big, compound lifts and if I can lift something for 6 reps I add weight. I've been getting stronger because I'm building on the progress. It's all one coordinated effort that focuses on 1 rep-max strength. Shortly I'll be transitioning to Power and after that to a Sport Specific phase that combines all of the built upon training into practical application.

Hey, if you love Cross Fit and it gets you fired up then more power to you! Get out there and train!

kawaishi
09-29-2010, 10:55
I would suggest reading about periodization. Louie Simmons and Tudor Bompa are phenomenal.

MILON
09-29-2010, 11:47
If I may again, I think Kawaishi hit the nail on the head, "read about periodization", but I would generalize further. READ about training and educate yourself. Really, the issue here is knowing what you are doing or gettin guidance from reliable sources. Tudor Bompa's books are great! Also, books by Yessis, Siff, Verkhoshansky and Zatsiorsky are great, in my opinion. All of these authors are reputable people in the field. Some blogs and websites are great for training, including Crossfit! Some rip on t-nation, but most of the writers there are experienced strength coaches that refer to training as a whole and not just body building. And if you arent willing to educate yourself, get the guidance from an open-minded and properly educated (through experience and formal training) source.

The point I am trying to make is, again what Kawaishi said, crossfit should just be another tool in your performance enhancement tool box. There are so many proven ways of training out there and limiting yourself to just one isnt necessarily the best idea. Of course, if it works, then keep with it, but dont limit yourself and be close minded. It would appear none of the contributers to this particular thread are at all and I think thats spot on! I have met crossfitters and others who only subscribe to one method or mindset and I feel sorry for them. Close-mindedness is not a recipe for success in any area of life, IMO.

SF718, no need for apology, what so ever! I dont think anyone can down play the seriousness of rhabdo and I never thought you did.

kawika
10-31-2010, 10:28
Someone from the company over got rhabdo about 3 months ago. He started feeling ill and went to Clark clinic the day after a relatively mild workout(50 power snatches @135) and was found to have rhabdo. In his case however this was the second workout attempted of the day. He was dehydrated and drank copious amounts of coffee the morning off and polished off the workout session with a 6 pack of beer. He's my buddy so I won't say anything to major, but yea pretty ingenious right?

My point is crossfit doesn't have anything to do with it, in fact I would argue the opposite as most of their workouts are less than the 30 minute mark, albeit at a very high intensity. It was much more common when I was running track in that circle than what i've seen in crossfit/military athelete.

CDG
10-31-2010, 11:38
Someone from the company over got rhabdo about 3 months ago. He started feeling ill and went to Clark clinic the day after a relatively mild workout(50 power snatches @135) and was found to have rhabdo. In his case however this was the second workout attempted of the day. He was dehydrated and drank copious amounts of coffee the morning off and polished off the workout session with a 6 pack of beer. He's my buddy so I won't say anything to major, but yea pretty ingenious right?

My point is crossfit doesn't have anything to do with it, in fact I would argue the opposite as most of their workouts are less than the 30 minute mark, albeit at a very high intensity. It was much more common when I was running track in that circle than what i've seen in crossfit/military athelete.

While his dehydration and post-workout alcohol consumption were very unwise choices, 50 power snatches @ 135# is hardly a mild workout. One of the biggest problems with cases like this is the individual not being able to check their ego and scale things when starting the program. Just because you have the physical ability to perform a workout, doesn't mean you should do it. Example, I recently came off 4 months of following a program that focused on lifting heavy nearly every single day. Even the conditioning workouts were done with heavy weight. Bodyweight stuff rarely came up, and when it did it was nowhere near the amount of reps that some CF workouts prescribe. After finishing that program, my first "regular" CF workout had 100 pull-ups in it. I did it, and I even had the fastest time at the gym that day. However, it was 3 days before I could fully straighten my arms, and it was a week before I could straighten them without pain. I had the ability to do the workout, but it wasn't very smart of me to do so.

PRB
10-31-2010, 11:52
:confused: Are you sure that is Crossfit? From the basic fitness article they offer at their website for free, they talk about how for total fitness, an athlete should learn the basics of gymnastics (pushups, dips, pullups, rope climb), then muscle-up, for abdominal work, the L-sit and situps, and handstands, walking on the hands, and handstand pushups.

They also recommend exercises on the gymnastic rings if you have access to them.

In addition to gymnastics, they recommend learning the Olympic lifts (snatch and clean and jerk) and powerlifting (benchpress, barbell squat, and deadlift). These exercises build real strength and power.

They also emphasize that learning the Olympic lifts in particular takes time because of the techniques and strength required. For example, a good clean and jerk requires first a good barbell squat, a good deadlift, a good jerk, then you learn the clean, then you combine the clean with the jerk.

They talk about flexibility as well and stretching.

They say to "regularly learn and play new sports," as sport is the application of fitness. Playing sports develops all the physical qualities at the same time, but only in small amounts. Whereas training will develop specific qualities, but with repetition.

Just a note about handstands...have ayounger cousin, extremely physically fit that can walk on his hands like Payton. After doing this he had, basically, a stroke. The surgeon that worked with him stated that when hand standing the neck hyper extends fwd and that can restrict your arteries severely (did in his case)similar to a blockage.
He recovered after some serious complications but still has issues. Had the classic stroke signs too, blurring vision, face slackness, disoreintation etc.

Quixote
11-14-2010, 11:42
I've been doing Crossfit at a local affiliate for about 8 months now. There have been good times, bad times, vomit and syncope. I have to say that I feel much more fit. With that said, I'm not sure if I feel stronger. It seems like the more Crossfit I do, the better I get at Crossfit. There hasn't been a great transition over into run times or 1RM increases.

My eventual goal is to transition to Military Athlete operator sessions, but I'm not strong enough to get over the minimum 100 point score on their fitness test. The biggest hurdle seems to be the lifts, I'm just not strong enough to knock out enough reps.

This led me on a search for a solution, and I would greatly appreciate any advice you guys could pass on. I've been reading about Olympic weightlifting, Rippetoe, and a bunch of other fitness resources, and it got me wondering:

Would I be better served switching to a Starting Strength/Stronglifts 5x5 workout with bodyweight calisthenics (push ups, pull ups, sit ups, and such), running, and rucking mixed in on the off days? The randomization inherent in Crossfit programming seems to be stopping me from building up a solid base of strength.

wet dog
11-14-2010, 12:54
I was doing crossfit but did not fit with "the culture of the local training facility". Aside from being cliquey, which I could deal with, they repeatedly played loud rap music with lyrics about raping women. I know other facilities most likely do not play that sort of music but given I was spending $150/month for myself and my son, I thought I could spend my money more wisely.

Though I like crossfit exercises, I like mtnathlete.com and militaryathlete.com better and used to visit them when Rob posted the workouts for free.

That's just too funny.

Last winter, I entered a local gym for some weight training.

To my surprise, a young man was walking on a treadmill, army shorts, army t-shirt, large ruck sack. When I approached, he smiled and removed his MP3 wire from his ear. It appears that smart soldiers will find a way to continue with training requirements dispite the level of snow outside.

The smile was the near indicator we had recruited the correct candidate.

Good on him.

FYI - the MP3 was playing Russian, second year.

furry
11-15-2010, 12:39
I visited the MountainAthlete affiliate in Boulder a few times last summer at the urging of a few friends who are professional climbers in the area. (I climb at a relatively high level, though not getting paid for it.) It was their first experience with a more wholistic conditioning program so they were excited about it.

I, however, was less-than-impressed. I've been oly lifting since high school and incorporated Crossfit style training about 4 years ago. The lady running the place seemed to have little knowledge of biomechanics, training philosophy, and the movements. She has since separated from MA and calls her place "The Alpine Training Center," so perhaps her lack of personal knowledge is not reflective on HQ, although they did 'sanction' her.

The programming did come straight from HQ, and I was also unimpressed. Workouts were typically an hour-long slog session at around %80 intensity. I think the value of CF/CFE is the high intensity, shorter duration met-con training combined with those all-important strength days as noted above. Slugging it out for an hour felt far less productive than a strength session and/or an anerobic metcon at full tilt.

Oh, and I don't care how fit you are, you can't sprint for an hour, so don't tell me you just need to "build up to handle that much volume."

Leozinho
11-15-2010, 13:54
I've been doing Crossfit at a local affiliate for about 8 months now. There have been good times, bad times, vomit and syncope. I have to say that I feel much more fit. With that said, I'm not sure if I feel stronger. It seems like the more Crossfit I do, the better I get at Crossfit. There hasn't been a great transition over into run times or 1RM increases.

This was my experience with XFit as well. I didn't get stronger. I did get better at throwing a medicine ball against the wall, thrusting low weights, etc.



Would I be better served switching to a Starting Strength/Stronglifts 5x5 workout with bodyweight calisthenics (push ups, pull ups, sit ups, and such), running, and rucking mixed in on the off days? The randomization inherent in Crossfit programming seems to be stopping me from building up a solid base of strength.

What are your 1RMs in the big lifts now and what sort of goal and timeline do you have? (Someone headed to Basic in two months might need a different program than someone looking for general fitness, or someone shipping out in a year, etc.)

I've always felt Xfit was better for the already strong, and not so good for skinny guys trying to get bigger and stronger. Doing a few months of a 5x5 program is a pretty common recommendation. After you stop making the easy gains on a linear progression program, you could transition to a strength biased hybrid program. CF Football, Grant Hybrid, and Black Box all have more strength focus than the main page.

Surgicalcric
11-15-2010, 16:30
I've been doing Crossfit at a local affiliate for about 8 months now. ...I have to say that I feel much more fit. With that said, I'm not sure if I feel stronger...

My eventual goal is to transition to Military Athlete operator sessions...

...Would I be better served switching to a Starting Strength/Stronglifts 5x5 workout with bodyweight calisthenics (push ups, pull ups, sit ups, and such), running, and rucking mixed in on the off days? The randomization inherent in Crossfit programming seems to be stopping me from building up a solid base of strength.

Like others have stated here and elsewhere x-fit isn't going to make you strong (relative) but it will make you more fit, if general fitness is your goal. If your goal is combat fitness you need to look elsewhere or use x-fit for met-con and use a strength program to get/stay strong.

As for MA, I know guys who have started the Op Sessions who didn't score 100 on Op Ugly who progressed just fine and have also known guys who couldn't take it. What does your 1RM's look like? How is your conditioning with X-fit?

My advice to you is print off the free sessions and give them a shot. If you can complete the workouts as designed to the time standard then have at it...if not or if your 1RM's are weak (relative to your size/weight) you may be better served starting a 5x5 cycle until such a time that you can...

Crip

BigJimCalhoun
11-15-2010, 20:09
I visited the MountainAthlete affiliate in Boulder a few times last summer at the urging of a few friends who are professional climbers in the area. (I climb at a relatively high level, though not getting paid for it.) It was their first experience with a more wholistic conditioning program so they were excited about it.

I, however, was less-than-impressed. I've been oly lifting since high school and incorporated Crossfit style training about 4 years ago. The lady running the place seemed to have little knowledge of biomechanics, training philosophy, and the movements. She has since separated from MA and calls her place "The Alpine Training Center," so perhaps her lack of personal knowledge is not reflective on HQ, although they did 'sanction' her.

The programming did come straight from HQ, and I was also unimpressed. Workouts were typically an hour-long slog session at around %80 intensity. I think the value of CF/CFE is the high intensity, shorter duration met-con training combined with those all-important strength days as noted above. Slugging it out for an hour felt far less productive than a strength session and/or an anerobic metcon at full tilt.

Oh, and I don't care how fit you are, you can't sprint for an hour, so don't tell me you just need to "build up to handle that much volume."
Thank you for providing that input. Boulder is too far North for me and I avoid that area for a number of reasons. I considered doing a one day workout there but then saw it was not on the M.A. site anymore.

Quixote
11-15-2010, 20:36
I just got back from the gym, testing out my major lifts. I was a little shocked, and not in a good way. Up until now I've been out of balance, with my lower body significantly stronger than my upper body. No longer, it seems. I didn't do 1rm, but did a few warmup sets then went for a 5RM and plugged the numbers into a calculator. Here's what it said.

Back Squat - 210 1RM
Bench Press - 210 1RM
Dead lift - 315 1RM
Power Clean - 165 1RM

This is at a bodyweight of 205. It's a little disturbing. It might be that I'm out of practice with the Back Squat (my Front Squat's currently equal to it).

As far as conditioning, I've got a fair base of metcon now. Last serious metcon WOD we did was Kelly, which I finished in a bit under 25 minutes, if I'm remembering right.

I've got 4 1/2 months before I ship out to basic. Here are the fitness benchmarks I would like to be at before I go, if you guys could let me know if this is feasible or if I should specialize into a different area, I would really appreciate it.

1.3x BP
1.5x BS
2x DL
10 mile run (currently at 4 miles)
<13:00 2 mile run (currently at just under 15:00)
80+ Pushups in 2 minutes (currently at ~60)
80+ Situps in 2 minutes (currently at ~70)
16 mile ruck w/55lb in under 3h40m (currently at 5 miles in 64:30 w/45lb)

It seems like I can't fit everything into a week, and it makes me really worry about compromising progress by not giving my body time to recover. Especially since I'm currently still in a calorie deficit (at ~17% bodyfat, trying to get under 14% to help with run times and bodyweight movements).

Thanks again everybody for taking the time to help with your advice.

BrianH
11-15-2010, 21:30
I just got back from the gym, testing out my major lifts. I was a little shocked, and not in a good way. Up until now I've been out of balance, with my lower body significantly stronger than my upper body. No longer, it seems. I didn't do 1rm, but did a few warmup sets then went for a 5RM and plugged the numbers into a calculator. Here's what it said.

Back Squat - 210 1RM
Bench Press - 210 1RM
Dead lift - 315 1RM
Power Clean - 165 1RM

This is at a bodyweight of 205. It's a little disturbing. It might be that I'm out of practice with the Back Squat (my Front Squat's currently equal to it).
That's pretty weak. 210 1RM back squat? It's been a LONG time since my 1RM back squat was under 335, and I am your weight.

You've got a ways to go. At your weight you should be squatting at LEAST 315 as a starting point and dead lifting in the 405 area. That's not "strong", but it is a base at least.

99meters
11-15-2010, 22:24
If your goal is combat fitness you need to look elsewhere...

Specificity is The single most important concept in training.
What is specificity for the soldier?

furry
11-15-2010, 23:35
Thank you for providing that input. Boulder is too far North for me and I avoid that area for a number of reasons. I considered doing a one day workout there but then saw it was not on the M.A. site anymore.

Well, for me there are a number of reasons I love this area, such as Eldorado Canyon, Boulder Canyon, RMNP, etc...

As for gyms, if you're interested, I've been training with Triyoga Endurance in south Golden the last few months. They seem to have a good idea of what's up: the owner and his other trainer are former 75th guys, and while they appreciate the effectiveness of Crossfit's certain methodologies, they aren't Kool-Aid drinkers either.

And yes, Quixote, at that BW your numbers are very low. IMO check out doing a cycle of CF Football or Performance Menu to get your basic strength to a point where it needs to be.

CDG
11-16-2010, 11:17
I just got back from the gym, testing out my major lifts. I was a little shocked, and not in a good way. Up until now I've been out of balance, with my lower body significantly stronger than my upper body. No longer, it seems. I didn't do 1rm, but did a few warmup sets then went for a 5RM and plugged the numbers into a calculator. Here's what it said.

Back Squat - 210 1RM
Bench Press - 210 1RM
Dead lift - 315 1RM
Power Clean - 165 1RM

This is at a bodyweight of 205. It's a little disturbing. It might be that I'm out of practice with the Back Squat (my Front Squat's currently equal to it).

As far as conditioning, I've got a fair base of metcon now. Last serious metcon WOD we did was Kelly, which I finished in a bit under 25 minutes, if I'm remembering right.

I've got 4 1/2 months before I ship out to basic. Here are the fitness benchmarks I would like to be at before I go, if you guys could let me know if this is feasible or if I should specialize into a different area, I would really appreciate it.

1.3x BP
1.5x BS
2x DL
10 mile run (currently at 4 miles)
<13:00 2 mile run (currently at just under 15:00)
80+ Pushups in 2 minutes (currently at ~60)
80+ Situps in 2 minutes (currently at ~70)
16 mile ruck w/55lb in under 3h40m (currently at 5 miles in 64:30 w/45lb)

It seems like I can't fit everything into a week, and it makes me really worry about compromising progress by not giving my body time to recover. Especially since I'm currently still in a calorie deficit (at ~17% bodyfat, trying to get under 14% to help with run times and bodyweight movements).

Thanks again everybody for taking the time to help with your advice.

You are going to have to figure out what you really want to improve and go from there. It will be way too much volume for you to try and significantly increase your strength while also trying to hit run/ruck goals. Don't try to do both or you will just end up frustrated and likely overtrained/injured. Being stronger will benefit everything else you want to do, so I would focus on that. Start following the CrossFit Football Amateur level strength programming, along with their met-cons. It's a fantastic program and I saw huge gains in my strength from it. Once you have surpassed your strength goals by 20-30#, stop and start focusing on your running/rucking more. Your lifts will lose some poundage, which is the reason for exceeding your current goals by a bit. But you will still settle in at a much higher strength level than you are at now.

bk4242
11-16-2010, 11:59
Although I visit this site to do more reading rather than writing, I can add something that has worked for me in the past to get through weight lifting plateus in between fb seasons. When I got stuck at something like 350 benchpress or 405 squat, I would switch to a pyramid rep program. Usually I would do something like 10,8,5,3,3,2,5,10. This allowed me to gain strength on my 1rm's and keep a bit of muscle endurance. It also allowed the body to warm up some more before loading up the bar. But like everything else, what may work for one person may not work for another.

BK

KiloNovember
11-16-2010, 15:08
I've been fiddling with Crossfit for awhile, and got serious about it over the summer. I am in much better shape now because of it, but following the programming on the mainsite doesn't provide enough running or, in my opinion, strength in areas like chest or shoulders. I've had to supplement, and throw in a lot of the bodyweight metcons along with strength programming and running.

That being said, I just came across www.sealfit.com, which seems to incorporate crossfit-type metcons with programmed strength, more running and endurance work. Anyone else have any experience with it? I just ran the workout for today this morning, and it was a kick in the teeth (in a good way, of course).

conrad30
05-02-2011, 12:33
I have been doing crossfit for about 4 months now and my experience has been phenominal. The gym that I attend is run by a USMC Scout/ Sniper who picked up a lot of his training ingenuity while trying to stay in shape in Fallujah.
When I started out I was definitely overweight and have dropped about 25 pounds over the course of 4 months without major diet alterations AND my stength, stamina and explosiveness have gone through the roof. Since the workouts are designed to be short and intense, we do not do a lot of running >1000 meter intervals but are encouraged to run on our own time in what are called the "Endurance WODs." I am a former D1 football player so I had a decent strength background to begin with. Several years of focussing more on strength than conditioning (because it comes easier to me) left me strong but in poor condition.
The best aspect of crossfit (other than the conditioning) is that you are forced to learn exercises that are extremely difficult like overhead squats, snatches, cleans, handstand pushups etc that have great carryover to practical force application and your body's ability to do work.

Clay
05-08-2011, 19:10
I've been looking into xfit for about 2 weeks now, and my only question is that, in a combat and/or military setting, are you more likely to use the overall fitness of xfit and workouts of its nature, or would being a major league lifter be more useful. I know for me, at 6'2" 168ish combined with what would be genetics I guess, (all males in my family are tall and rail thin), I have a better chance of using xfit and maximizing my fitness than being "optimus prime" and benching 538 lbs. There's nothing wrong with that, but I just don't see it for my body type.

hotshot
05-08-2011, 19:47
I've been looking into xfit for about 2 weeks now, and my only question is that, in a combat and/or military setting, are you more likely to use the overall fitness of xfit and workouts of its nature, or would being a major league lifter be more useful. I know for me, at 6'2" 168ish combined with what would be genetics I guess, (all males in my family are tall and rail thin), I have a better chance of using xfit and maximizing my fitness than being "optimus prime" and benching 538 lbs. There's nothing wrong with that, but I just don't see it for my body type.

What do you think? How will being able to bench press 538lbs help you carry 100+lbs of equipment through the mountains of Afghanistan? What makes you think that you can't become powerful doing crossfit? You need to learn how to apply the common sense test.

Read more. When your eyes get tired, go do the WOD, and come back and read.

CH

Calvengeance
05-10-2011, 22:14
I've been fiddling with Crossfit for awhile, and got serious about it over the summer. I am in much better shape now because of it, but following the programming on the mainsite doesn't provide enough running or, in my opinion, strength in areas like chest or shoulders. I've had to supplement, and throw in a lot of the bodyweight metcons along with strength programming and running.

That being said, I just came across www.sealfit.com, which seems to incorporate crossfit-type metcons with programmed strength, more running and endurance work. Anyone else have any experience with it? I just ran the workout for today this morning, and it was a kick in the teeth (in a good way, of course).

KiloNovember, any more thoughts on SealFit? I've just started to do it. How has it affected you?

Thanks.

Triângulo
05-14-2011, 15:49
There's also Crossfit Strength Bias, if you're looking to improve your overall strength, especially with the "slow lifts".... Basically heavy lifts (squat/press,dead/front squat), then followed by a metcon using that same lift but at a lighter weight for higher reps.

The "time" scheme is 2 days on, 1 off, 3 on, 1 off. Day 3 is supposed to be a "Long Metcon" I usually hit a long run, row, or ruck.

The article on it provides a simple template for you and "build" your own metcons throughout.... If anyones interested I can post or email the article to them

Blitzzz (RIP)
05-18-2011, 16:56
Just passing this along. Read up on the "Blitz Only Thread".

KiloNovember
05-20-2011, 15:05
KiloNovember, any more thoughts on SealFit? I've just started to do it. How has it affected you?


In general:
Most fun I've ever had with workouts. If I wasn't 18x, I would still be utilizing SEALFit as my main workout program. It's wonderful having suckfests programmed for you by someone with experience. I also like the SEALFit community better than the CrossFit (CF) community. Compared to CF, I believe SEALFit is definitely a step up in terms of mental and physical conditioning. After adapting to CF, SEALFit was the next logical step for me in improving general physical preparedness (GPP).

In regards to SFAS:
I do not believe religiously following the main programming alone will prepare someone for selection. Based on the knowledge available on this forum, SEALFit main programming does not include enough rucking (posted 1 or 2 times per month), running or calisthenics to be a good selection preparation program. And, to be honest, the candidate WODs likewise do not include enough rucking for a ruck-based selection like SFAS.


To conclude, I feel that SEALFit is outstanding (better than CF) for both GPP and mental conditioning, which can help those aspects of training involved in selection prep programs, but doesn't focus on the specifics that the QPs (and the Army, for that matter) have declared necessary for selection preparation. If GPP is what you want, I would recommend SEALFit over CF.


DISCLAIMER: I've made some assumptions here concerning SFAS, which I've yet to attend. I believe the assumptions to be reasonable based upon the knowledge provided on this forum by those who have attended the course. Please correct me if I am incorrect or stepping too far outside of my lane.

Calvengeance
05-24-2011, 23:58
I appreciate your help, KiloNovember.

I think I'm going to look at SealFit mixed with rucking and some time on my road bike this summer.