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1stindoor
08-10-2010, 14:33
So there I was...knee deep in handgrenade pins and MRE spoons...


Second Lt. Douglas Sofranko has spent the last year impressing his fellow soldiers in the Florida Army National Guard with stories of his days as a Navy SEAL, while proudly wearing the distinctive Trident insignia on his Army uniform. He even had the SEAL Creed hung on the wall of his office.

The problem is, it was all a lie.

The 33-year-old Army officer and former enlisted sailor, who works at the Ballard Armory in Miami as rear support for the Guard’s 1st Battalion, 124th Infantry, did attend Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL training in Coronado, Calif., in 1996. But according to Naval Special Warfare Command, he washed out of training. His class graduated without him in February 1997.

http://www.armytimes.com/news/2010/08/navy_seal_faker_080910w/

1stindoor
08-10-2010, 14:41
More fun "facts" on the young'n...

After washing out of BUD/S, according to his Navy records, Sofranko — then a radioman — spent three years at a radio station in Hawaii and was discharged in Oct. 24, 1999, as an RM3.

In June 2000, he enlisted in the Pennsylvania National Guard and was assigned to Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 111th Infantry. Two years later, Sofranko received a general discharge under honorable conditions for unsatisfactory participation, meaning he missed too many drills and other training periods.

“He was basically AWOL from the time he joined,” said Sgt. Matt Jones, a spokesman for the Pennsylvania National Guard. “He never made an annual training period that we can see, and he was discharged as an E-3.”

But Sofranko was given another chance.

In April 2007, he got a waiver from the Florida National Guard despite his poor Pennsylvania service and was allowed to join in Florida as an E-4. Artley said waivers like this are common in the Guard and are based on a review of the member’s service record and personal interviews.

A year later, Sofranko entered the Florida National Guard Officer Candidate Program, graduating one year ago.

http://www.armytimes.com/news/2010/0...faker_080910w/

rdret1
08-10-2010, 22:08
Things catch up to you eventually.

JJ_BPK
08-11-2010, 05:58
I'll bet this Asshat gets off with little more than a letter of reprimand..


What price could he pay?

According to the Florida National Guard, Sofranko could face disciplinary action if found guilty of wearing the Trident.

Sofranko’s battalion, and the rest of the Florida-based 53rd Brigade Combat Team, is deployed with units in Kuwait and Iraq. Sofranko, who is working for the Guard on a yearlong recall, is part of the rear detachment handling pay, personnel and logistics issues.

Though Guardsmen on state duty aren’t subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice, they do fall under their state’s military codes, according to A.J. Artley, spokesman for the Florida National Guard, in a written response to questions.

Under Florida code, “Wearing an unauthorized award or insignia is a prohibited act,” he wrote.

“We are currently in the beginning stages of investigating what, if any, misconduct has been committed by this soldier,” Artley wrote. “If he is found guilty of misconduct, the unit commander would be the one to determine punishment.

“Punishment could range from making sure ... Sofranko doesn’t wear the award again and a written reprimand, to fines or any number of punishments.”

SouthernDZ
08-11-2010, 06:19
Though Guardsmen on state duty aren’t subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice, they do fall under their state’s military codes, according to A.J. Artley, spokesman for the Florida National Guard, in a written response to questions.

Is this true? The Army NG are not subject to UCMJ? Is this something recent?

JJ_BPK
08-11-2010, 06:40
Is this true? The Army NG are not subject to UCMJ? Is this something recent?

It's new to me,, Maybe abc_123 can verify??

Update, I received this from JAGO


The authority to punish under the UCMJ is per Title 10 US Code. Persons must have "status" to be subject to the UCMJ. Lots of people have "status", including cadets, active duty, reservists, retirees, civilians w/ the force during time of war, etc.

National Guards have their roots in the militias and are tied to State government. Authority for the Guard is per Title 32 US Code.

While in Title 32 status, Guardsmen may be punished by their respective states (and many states do have a version of the UCMJ) for these sorts of violations, however, they may are not subject to the "federal" Title 10 UCMJ.

Punishments under a "state" version of the UCMJ are generally considerable milder than that of the UCMJ we all know and love......

Still, the Stolen Valor Act would be available to an interested US Attorney.

Dozer523
08-11-2010, 11:56
Is this true? The Army NG are not subject to UCMJ? Is this something recent?This from a PM from one of the few lawyers we won't kill. Dozer 523/TS,
There is a thread in Hall of Shame about a nat'l guard Lt type not being subject to UCMJ. There is a reason for that because of Title 32 US Code vs Title 10.
I tried to jump in with the reason for this but I get a pop up that I don't have permissions to that thread..
Glad to pitch in and help if wanted.


v/r
phil
JAGO

Surgicalcric
08-11-2010, 12:15
NG soldiers are subject to UCMJ action. Depending on whether or not the soldier is on Title 32 (state) or 10 (federal) orders will determine who pursues the action.

If the soldier was on federal orders at time the crime was committed the Army can order him back to AD for punishment; if he was simply a drilling (M-day) soldier at the time of the offense it will fall on the Florida NG's shoulders to prosecute the guy.

Title 10 vs 32 stuff gets quite confusing even for those who deal with it day-in and day-out...

Hope this makes things clear as mud.

ETA: seems I said little more than JAGO...

Crip

1stindoor
08-11-2010, 12:16
Thanks JAGO and Dozer for clearing that up. I'm sure there's lots of folks that didn't know that.

rdret1
08-11-2010, 12:33
It would appear this guy has a lengthy pattern of deceitfullness. It seems odd that the board which considered him for OCS did not take that ihto consideration, and if they did, did not give it much value. I would think some of them are reconsidering their decisions.

greenberetTFS
08-11-2010, 12:55
This from a PM from one of the few lawyers we won't kill.

It's really "sad" that guys like him can get away with s**t like this!.....:mad::mad::mad:

Big Teddy :munchin

The Reaper
08-11-2010, 15:13
From our favorite Jag, JAGO.

TR

I tried to answer your question but I don't have rights to the thread.

The authority to punish under the UCMJ is per Title 10 US Code. Persons must have "status" to be subject to the UCMJ. Lots of people have "status", including cadets, active duty, reservists, retirees, civilians w/ the force during time of war, etc.

National Guards have their roots in the militias and are tied to State government. Authority for the Guard is per Title 32 US Code. While in Title 32 status, Guardsmen may be punished by their respective states (and many states do have a version of the UCMJ) for these sorts of violations, however, they may are not subject to the "federal" Title 10 UCMJ. Punishments under a "state" version of the UCMJ are generally considerable milder than that of the UCMJ we all know and love......

Still, the Stolen Valor Act would be available to an interested US Attorney.

v/r
phil

Dozer523
08-12-2010, 21:45
Having served on active duty with West Point Grads, ROTC and OCS the one thing they all had in common was an extensive military education that included numerous (even though, very different) vetting points.

Serving in the Guard for the last five or six years (including a deployment to Afghanistan with a NG company) I have found that the training for the officers is far less rigorous and certainly much less time consuming. I'd be interested to see the actual numbers regarding officers relieved in theater but from what I saw the NG had a bunch of them. If there is statistical evidence that the NG OCS -- the primary means of assession -- Grad is proving to be less prepared and effective then the system of a few weeks of training to top off a college degree might need to be re-worked.
For example: Get rid of the state OCS programs and require all Enlisted and NCO's to attend the regular Army OCS program.
Require all NG officers to complete an approved ROTC program and allow them to opt for the Guard rather then Active Duty following attendance at OBC (or whatever they call it now).

Mon' back.

alright4u
08-13-2010, 00:05
The NG slots are politics. Hell, try a MSG with 28 plus years who just did his first 6 month combat tour of his entire career in Afghan early this Spring. I kid you not. He is a state HQ Signal NCO. He served with the Poles, I think.

ZonieDiver
08-13-2010, 11:01
Having served on active duty with West Point Grads, ROTC and OCS the one thing they all had in common was an extensive military education that included numerous (even though, very different) vetting points.

Serving in the Guard for the last five or six years (including a deployment to Afghanistan with a NG company) I have found that the training for the officers is far less rigorous and certainly much less time consuming. I'd be interested to see the actual numbers regarding officers relieved in theater but from what I saw the NG had a bunch of them. If there is statistical evidence that the NG OCS -- the primary means of assession -- Grad is proving to be less prepared and effective then the system of a few weeks of training to top off a college degree might need to be re-worked.
For example: Get rid of the state OCS programs and require all Enlisted and NCO's to attend the regular Army OCS program.
Require all NG officers to complete an approved ROTC program and allow them to opt for the Guard rather then Active Duty following attendance at OBC (or whatever they call it now).

Mon' back.

Even with my limited and outdated experience with NG OCS types, I'd agree with this. We had a detachment commander who had gotten his commission through the NG OCS before coming to USAR. He was a 1Lt when I first met him, and a Maj when he was relieved of command for sexual harrassment. (And there was NO doubt about what he did...) He couldn't find the coffee in the morning with lots of help.

Several others cross my mind as well, but when I met them they had just finished and were 2Lt's... hardly fair to judge 'em all by a bunch of second looies.

JJ_BPK
08-13-2010, 11:40
Even with my limited and outdated experience with NG OCS types, I'd agree with this.

Limited experience,, so limited input..

Of the 20ty or so NG O's I have known, 85% were hard working and dedicated to their part-time job,, but did lack somewhat for not having spent time on both ends of a gun's barrel.

When I was with FLNG, the CO & 3 of the O's were prior AD, one was AD SF, out of 16(?) slots.

Most of the 2nd Lt's were short timers and quickly faded back into civilian life. Unfortunately, One particular 2nd Lt, who was a Darwin award Candidate, 1st Class, stayed. Last I heard he is a Lt Col in a leg transportation unit..

Politics played a very large roll in all things FLNG, and I suspect it still does.

After politics,, availability was the leading factor. To many were dragged off the teams because of peer pressure (it was the 70t's), family responsibilities, and career demands.

I had at least 2 in my civilian management column that were big time peace-nik's and did not like the fact that I wasn't.. I was very lucky to have 110% at my 3rd & 4th management level.

When I ask for a couple more week off after summer camp, for jump master school, I received a lot of very cold shoulders.. Never did get to go as I broke my back a week before we were to go to Benning and spent 3 weeks in bed.. Which pissed my boss off,, almost as much..

Given the sum of the total,, NG staffing has inherent quality problems, and will continue to do so..

This is not a dig,, just a reality check. I think the current 20th & 19th SF(A) are fielding troops that far exceed what the NG units had 35 yrs ago..


My $00.0002...

Surgicalcric
08-21-2010, 16:22
Getting his...

http://www.armytimes.com/news/...al-insignia-082110w/


By Mark D. Faram - Staff writer
Posted : Saturday Aug 21, 2010 9:24:01 EDT

Second Lt. Douglas Sofranko, a Florida National Guard officer photographed wearing a Navy SEAL Trident insignia he didn’t rate, has been relieved of his full-time duties with the Guard, and his future in the military is uncertain.

Sources told Army Times that Sofranko had been fired from his full-time job under state orders after Army Times informed Guard officials that Sofranko was wearing unauthorized insignia. But a spokesman would confirm only that he was no longer on temporary Guard orders.

Sofranko was a sailor from 1996 to 1999, during which time he attended Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL training in Coronado, Calif., but did not graduate. He received his commission in the Florida National Guard in August 2009 and, when confronted by Army Times on Aug. 4, admitted occasionally wearing the SEAL Trident on his Army combat uniform. Sources in his unit — 1st Battalion, 124th Infantry — said he also posted a copy of the SEAL Creed on his office wall.

When asked why he did it, he said “No excuse, really. Just poor, poor judgment.”

Sofranko, until recently, was on active-duty operational support orders for the Guard.

“ADOS is a temporary active-duty status for a specific project,” said A.J. Artley, spokesman for the Florida National Guard. “As far as we know … he is no longer on ADOS orders — we are not aware of him being fired nor were we made aware of the reason why he is no longer on temporary orders.”

Artley earlier told Army Times that Sofranko’s unit is investigating the matter. Most of his unit is deployed to Iraq and Kuwait, and Sofranko was serving as part of the rear detachment in Miami.

Army Times was unable to reach Sofranko for comment.

“We spoke with his commander, who told us he anticipates to have a decision on this matter completed by the end of this month, and this was all he was able to say at this time,” Artley said.

In a deeper review of Sofranko’s training records, it’s clear he didn’t make it very far in SEAL training.

According to those records, Sofranko reported in June 14, 1996, and started training with BUD/S Class 209 on Aug. 19, but was no longer in the class when they started “Hell Week,” one of the toughest weeks of SEAL training.

“Sofranko is not on the Hell Week roster for Class 209, therefore he dropped somewhere in the first three weeks,” said Cmdr. Greg Geisen, spokesman for Navy Special Warfare Command.

Geisen said the command also checked the records for the next class, 210, which began Hell Week on Nov. 10, as SEAL candidates often get rolled back for medical or other reasons, but his name doesn’t show up there either.

JJ_BPK
08-21-2010, 16:26
Getting his...

2nd lt. who wore SEAL insignia loses job


Good Job.. :lifter:lifter:lifter:lifter

18C4V
08-21-2010, 16:46
That author who broke that story should run with the story of the SF Poser from N.C.!!!

PRB
08-22-2010, 11:49
in O7 in Astan I was working with the Afghan 205th Corps in Kandahar and surrounding provinces.
There is a NG unit assigned on rotation to the Corps as mentors and trainers etc that we worked with.
Lots of great Americans doing a diff job.
However, I did note that the Officer Corps is basically politics.
The units Commanding Col....Kentucky NG Inf unit was relieved in theatre for being totally inept. Totally.
He should have been a MG ammo bearer (no offense to hard charging AB's).
To get relieved in the NG, under any circumstances, is unusual so that gives you an idea of his inabilities.
He was a local HS Football coach and teacher and a good 'ol boy.
Having said that, Col. Miller, from the Indiana Natl. guard, previous Cmdr, was truley excellent.
There is no 'band of excellence' on the NG O graph, it is all over the place.

The Reaper
08-22-2010, 13:35
He should have stopped with an unearned SF Tab.

Clearly, no one would have done shit about that.

The SEALs take this seriously, and defend their honor.

TR