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Shock
04-17-2010, 23:56
I too am a firm believer of checking your feet, but how important is it actually? While with the IDF I completed a 60k ruck march in just over 11 hours, while we had several short breaks no one was allowed to even sit. There was, however, one break in the middle of the event where nearly everyone changed socks, powdered their feet and had some fruit. In all the marches we had leading to the event, starting with a 2k, this was the first and only march where we were allowed to change socks yet everyone's feet were fine. Including mine.

When dealing with short navigation at 12 miles and under I don't understand why anyone would need to stop and change anything UNLESS they feel something serious developing. Normally a quick 2-3 minute break each hour should be ok, right?

Impart me with your wisdom, I just got my ALICE and looking forward to start rucking again.

head
04-18-2010, 00:06
http://www.professionalsoldiers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=106&highlight=feet

Good advice in this thread and several other previous threads. Take it easy.

The Reaper
04-18-2010, 09:15
The Search button is only your friend if you actually use it.

TR

Shock
04-18-2010, 10:58
I was waiting for that, maybe you can accuse me of placing this question in the wrong place, but that's about it. I have read the other threads and believe that this is slightly different. None deal with the reasons behind checking your feet when you don't feel a reason to. If I'm only going on an 8 mile/ 2 hour ruck I might stop for two minutes to get a feel of things but if I don't feel anything I just continue. Can you explain why this is wrong?

TR, you yourself have mentioned here that you believe in checking your feet every 60 minutes or so. My question is why would you need to check your feet if they are already hardened by exhaustive rucking and broken in boots? If there is going to be a problem, in my experience you will probably feel it just as much as you see it.

Green Light
04-18-2010, 11:12
That may be the reason that his feet are in such great shape. Foot maintenance is important and right up there with hydration.

Priest
04-18-2010, 11:12
Because by the time you feel something is wrong, its too late to perform preventative maintenance on it.

The Reaper
04-18-2010, 11:18
I was waiting for that, maybe you can accuse me of placing this question in the wrong place, but that's about it. I have read the other threads and believe that this is slightly different. None deal with the reasons behind checking your feet when you don't feel a reason to. If I'm only going on an 8 mile/ 2 hour ruck I might stop for two minutes to get a feel of things but if I don't feel anything I just continue. Can you explain why this is wrong?

TR, you yourself have mentioned here that you believe in checking your feet every 60 minutes or so. My question is why would you need to check your feet if they are already hardened by exhaustive rucking and broken in boots? If there is going to be a problem, in my experience you will probably feel it just as much as you see it.

There are several good boot/feet threads here which you do not seem to have taken the time to read before starting a new thread.

Drying and airing your feet enables them to perform at higher levels for longer periods. Foot powder helps. Emerging problems are identified and treated before becoming major. Damp/wet feet and socks lead to problems, even with the toughest feet.

Do you have a lot of extended experience under a heavy ruck in a variety of environments, to include arctic or jungle, over several weeks?

TR

Shock
04-18-2010, 11:42
I was going on the optimal condition theory. Dry socks, decent pace, optimal weather.

I have spent no more than 10 days moving under a ruck at any given time, deep woodland and desert, no arctic. Though Heavy rains/ extreme heat and cold were factors, not saying it compares, just putting in my experience.

of course I would switch out wet socks immediately. My experience has been that my bones have given out far before my feet have, and again I was only referring to a time when you will be navigating under 12 miles. Not weeks.

The Reaper
04-18-2010, 11:56
The team only moves as fast as its slowest member.

One guy decides to gut it out through some hot spots and next thing you know, he has blistered his feet, cannot ruck any longer, and has to be helped to walk (or be carried), his load redistributed among the other team members, or evacced and the team left undermanned.

The periodic rest break allows the medic or leader to evaluate the condition of the unit's feet while requiring foot maintenance to prevent and address potential problems.

Yet another case of "mission first, men always" paying off.

TR

Shock
04-18-2010, 12:10
noted. I think there are some huge differences, militarily, that I need to get over.

SF_BHT
04-18-2010, 22:56
noted. I think there are some huge differences, militarily, that I need to get over.

You have to understand that some of us have been on opns that covered more land than Israel has. :eek: If you mess up the feet you are in deep shit...........

head
04-18-2010, 23:11
Shock, the problem with your assumption is that it's based on "feeling something is wrong." I, for one, need to remind myself to check my feet... I don't even notice hotspots until blood starts oozing out the side vents. :lifter

You were waiting for someone to tell you that you were messed up? Haha. For future reference, it's generally preferred to add your thoughts to an existing thread than starting a new one, if your question is only "slightly different" from existing topics.

Boomer-61
04-19-2010, 13:00
Shock,
You probably have more info than you need when it comes to this topic by now. The info The Reaper put out on his thread is about as good as it gets. If you're still looking for more data there is an excellent section in the book, Get Selected For SF by, Maj. Martin and Msgt. Dodson, check it out.