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lrd
07-19-2004, 17:28
Next month I am restarting graduate school (different major). Last time, I had to take all of my courses in the classroom. This time I have the option of Distance Learning or In-Class for many of my courses.

I've never taken a Distance Learning course, so need some advice.

Which do you prefer and why? (Pros and Cons?)

magician
07-19-2004, 18:35
Definitely the classroom.

It is the only way to check out the hotties.

:)

lrd
07-19-2004, 18:49
Originally posted by magician
Definitely the classroom.

It is the only way to check out the hotties.

:) Taken care of: I work in an office full of men in uniform.

The Reaper
07-19-2004, 18:53
Originally posted by lrd
Taken care of: I work in an office full of men in uniform.

Dooohh!!

Two letters. S.A.

TR

AngelsSix
07-19-2004, 18:57
Posted by Ird:
Taken care of: I work in an office full of men in uniform.

You go, girl!!

I have done both. Depends on the course. For math, I need two teachers and a tutor, so that is definitely in the classroom. English can easily be done via DL. I took English Comp II in Jacksonville, FL via distance learning and it was a breeze.
It all depends on how comfortable you are with the subject, etc. Some people do better with DL because they do not have the distractions of classes, it saves gas money and can be done at a more leisurely pace.

lrd
07-19-2004, 19:18
TR: :D

Angel: Thanks. I'm pre-registered for Economics via DL, and Financial Accounting in the classroom. Math is not my strong suit, so if you never hear from me after this semester you'll know why.

magician
07-20-2004, 01:46
I suck at math, and not because I was always checking out the hotties. I think that I am dyslexic. Or maybe just stupid.

Macro and Micro economics kicked my ass. I was fortunate to sit next to a .....hottie....in those courses. A smart one.

There is some situational awareness for you.

:)

myclearcreek
07-20-2004, 02:20
I prefer DL in most cases. However, for Math, I would want face-to-face. While I love the interaction normally, the DL classes I have been part of had discussion posting requirements. Most of the time, the discussion was fairly free and open. In one class, posting was like pulling teeth, but post I did.

Grad students, which make up the majority of participants in my classes, seem to interact more freely, but also more carefully, online than in the classroom. The discussion also seems more balanced online. No discussion hogs, lol.

Have fun, L! :lifter

lrd
07-20-2004, 05:41
Originally posted by myclearcreek
Have fun, L! :lifter I intend to. I decided to take NDD's advice and do the hard stuff first. :)

I may come looking for some of you nice gentlemen in the shiny suits (or was that: with the shiny teeth?) when I get to Contract Law.

FILO
07-20-2004, 08:29
You indicate that you have never taken a DL class. As a result, I would proceed with caution in regards to what classes you take DL versus class. I have taken and taught classes in both settings. A student's success or lack thereof is usually attributed to various individual factors: personal learning style, motivation, preference, initiative, life style, work, family situation ...etc. I recommend running through that checklist and then come up with your profile. IMHO, the most important factors on that list are your personal learning style and motivation.

Keep in mind there is a third option. Some classes offer a combination of both class and DL. This is an excellent manner of introducing yourself to DL. Good luck!

myclearcreek
07-20-2004, 10:11
Originally posted by FILO
Keep in mind there is a third option. Some classes offer a combination of both class and DL. This is an excellent manner of introducing yourself to DL. Good luck!


All but my phys ed classes have the combination. Students are expected, but not required to have online access from home, preferably a high-speed connection. If you do not currently have DSL or cable access, it is time to upgrade for DL. Otherwise, you will be frustrated to no end. I could click a link, dust the room, sit down and watch the page finish loading. Eeewwww, the memories. :boohoo Thank goodness that was only one semester.

lrd
07-20-2004, 12:16
Originally posted by FILO
You indicate that you have never taken a DL class. As a result, I would proceed with caution in regards to what classes you take DL versus class. I have taken and taught classes in both settings. A student's success or lack thereof is usually attributed to various individual factors: personal learning style, motivation, preference, initiative, life style, work, family situation ...etc. I recommend running through that checklist and then come up with your profile. IMHO, the most important factors on that list are your personal learning style and motivation.

Keep in mind there is a third option. Some classes offer a combination of both class and DL. This is an excellent manner of introducing yourself to DL. Good luck! Great advice.

The reason I went ahead and pre-registered for Economics (DL) is because of the professor. In addition to Econ, she teaches Distance Learning Education courses. Apparantly, people around here will wait a long time to get in one of her DL courses -- whatever the subject.

AngelsSix
07-20-2004, 16:25
Good deal, enjoy and good luck!!

FILO
07-21-2004, 09:40
Originally posted by lrd
Great advice.


My advice was based on over 11 years of teaching at the undergraduate level. A significant number of students that signed up for DL did so because they liked the idea of not attending class and without giving it much further thought. Well a significant percentage didn't do very well because they failed to properly under the concept of DL and the requirements. The hard part for them or in most cases their parents; the college charged the same tuition for DL and class. When attending a private university with national ranking----it means writing a BIG check.:eek: