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Dan
09-16-2009, 14:59
http://news.soc.mil/releases/News%20Archive/2009/September/090916-02.html

RELEASE NUMBER: 090916-02
DATE POSTED: SEPTEMBER 16, 2009

Green Beret Saves Neighbor’s Life
FORT LEWIS, Wash. (USASOC News Service, Sept. 16, 2009) – Medics in the U.S. Army prepare for a number of situations while training for combat. Preparing for the unexpected is part of the training, but saving a neighbor suffering from cardiopulmonary failure is not a situation discussed in training manuals.

This was the situation 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne) Green Beret Sergeant First Class Chad Harreld found himself in Oct. 17, 2008 when his neighbor, retired Army Chief Warrant Officer 3 Chuck Moore, called requesting medical assistance. His actions that Friday night earned him an Army Commendation Medal.

Harreld had just finished a phone conversation with Moore and was thinking about what he would do during the coming weekend.

“Everything seemed normal,” said Harreld. “About 15 minutes later I received another call from (Moore). I figure he had another joke or thought that he wanted to share with me about our previous conversation minutes earlier.”

Instead of hearing the retired Chinook pilot jovially tell a joke as he expected, Harreld struggled to hear a labored voice that was hard to distinguish.

“I could barely make out his voice over the phone,” explained the Special Forces medic. “I confirmed with my caller ID that it was actually him. I could hear him make out the words ‘Doc, I can’t breathe.’"

Harreld promptly hung up the phone and instructed his children to stay put and told them that he would “be right back.” He grabbed his first aid bag and bolted to his neighbor’s house.

Harreld found Moore in bed, peaked and gasping for air. As Harreld began his assessment, Moore stopped breathing. Harreld directed Moore’s wife, Kum-cha, to call local emergency medical services for assistance. Harreld then began rescue breathing to keep Moore alive.

“After about 10-15 minutes on assisted ventilation, (Moore) began to regain consciousness,” said Harreld.

Shortly thereafter, EMS arrived with all the tools necessary to finish what Harreld had started.

After providing information and assistance to the ambulance crew, Harreld watched helplessly as his patient was driven to the hospital.

“I was honestly quite scared for him, it's not a normal daily occurrence to stop breathing for an extended period of time,” said Harreld.

Harreld added that he called the hospital where Moore had been transported to and checked on him about an hour later.

“I was very relieved to hear he was going to be admitted,” said Harreld. “I knew that there wasn't anything else I could have possibly done, but the thought is always in the back of your head.”

As a result of Harreld’s leadership and skill, the ambulance crew saved time by not having to problem solve much on their patient.

“They reacted from his judgment,” said Moore. “He saved my [explicit] life that night.”

Moore added that he is extremely grateful to have an intelligent and competent neighbor such as Harreld as a friend and neighbor.

Harreld said that he glad that his neighbor is well and at home now.

“He would have done the same thing for me,” said Harreld.

--usasoc--

bluebb
09-16-2009, 20:35
Great Job SFC Harreld!

Blue

BryanK
09-17-2009, 05:51
Outstanding work SFC Harreld! :lifter Hope his neighbor recovered well.

The Reaper
09-17-2009, 08:30
Well done, Sergeant.

TR

SF_BHT
09-17-2009, 10:09
Good Job.......

greenberetTFS
09-17-2009, 10:23
Outstanding ................:D

Big Teddy

Divemaster
10-25-2009, 17:58
Chad was my senior medic in Iraq. Outstanding job by an outstanding soldier!

Decoy_Octopus
08-15-2010, 20:13
how does he have a CMB if he is a medic?

SF_BHT
08-15-2010, 20:40
how does he have a CMB if he is a medic?

Why?
He is not wearing a combat medical badge did you mean CIB?

Decoy_Octopus
08-15-2010, 22:09
Why?
He is not wearing a combat medical badge did you mean CIB?

Yea CIB

BRAVO-SMASH
08-16-2010, 01:18
Why don't you research CIB regulations?

LongWire
08-16-2010, 03:13
Yea CIB

Why don't you research CIB regulations?

And then go back and read the Forum rules while you are at it!! Your days here are numbered if you cant follow simple rules and continue to piss Members off!!!!

JJ_BPK
08-16-2010, 05:45
Yea CIB

Here is a hint:

Why: AR 600–8–22, Military Awards

When & Where: AR 670–1 Uniforms and Insignia


Tell us the page number(s) where you found the pertinent reference(s)..


:munchin

Decoy_Octopus
08-16-2010, 16:02
Sorry again guys. I will search and research everything from now. Sorry again

LongWire
08-17-2010, 01:40
Here is a hint:

Why: AR 600–8–22, Military Awards

When & Where: AR 670–1 Uniforms and Insignia


Tell us the page number(s) where you found the pertinent reference(s)..


:munchin

Sorry again guys. I will search and research everything from now. Sorry again


I'm not seeing an answer...........

You do realize that there are a number of reasons why he has the awards that are on his uniform, even for the un-informed. The easiest in my mind is that he could have been prior Infantry before coming to SF.

Someone who proposes to be in pursuit of an SF career, and a soldier, should at least know a little something about Army awards and the process.

I suggest that the next time you want to call someone's (especially one of my Brothers) records into question, that you should at least have your Facts straight, and at a minimum know which awards you are talking about.

You've been asked for an answer........we expect one. Thanks................

Decoy_Octopus
08-17-2010, 20:02
(c) Soldiers possessing MOS of 18D (Special Forces Medical Sergeant) who satisfactorily perform Special Forces duties while assigned or attached to a Special Forces unit of brigade, regimental, or smaller size during any period such unit is engaged in active ground combat may be awarded the CIB. These Soldiers must have been personally present and engaged in active ground combat, to close with and destroy the enemy with direct fires. Retroactive awards under these criteria are not authorized for service prior to 18 September 2001.

(d) Those Soldiers possessing MOS of 18D who qualify for award of the Combat Medical Badge (CMB) from 18 September 2001 to the 3 June 2005, will remain qualified for the badge. Upon request any such soldier may be awarded the CIB instead of the CMB. In such instances, the Soldier must submit a request through the chain of command to the CG, U.S. Army Human Resources Command, ATTN: AHRC-PDO-PA, 200 Stovall Street, Alexandria, VA 22332-0471 for conversion of the CMB to the CIB.

docholiday161
08-29-2010, 00:00
I think the term "Spotlight Ranger" comes to mind. I'm pretty sure that my fellow brother is well aware of the awards that he is authorized to wear and definately sure that he has not received half of the awards he deserves.

An awesome job done by an awesome soldier and "Quiet Professional". Hope all turned out well for the neighbor.