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NousDefionsDoc
08-30-2009, 12:03
Have any of you guys ever heard of the iodine water purification tabs causing menstruation to start?

I got that question Friday and in 25 years I've never heard of it, but I haven't worked around females a lot.

A point in the direction of a study or some other evidence would be great.

Many thanks,

Bill

armymom1228
08-30-2009, 12:25
I have tried

Google
www.pdrhealth.com (click drugs and supplements at the time of the page)
www.medlineplus.gov
www.nih.gov

used the search terms

OTC PDR --> to get to the otc drug book, nothing
NIH to see if there are any ongoing studies for "iodine water purification tabs"
medline plus that has all the links to most medicne websites for the public..
tried my nursing sites too.. so far nothing..
will talk to the CRNP at work tomorrow and see if she has heard anything.

perhaps I am using the wrong search phrase?

HowardCohodas
08-30-2009, 14:51
I believe that this concern was sparked by reports of menstruation disorders observed after treatment with I-131, a radioactive isotope used in treating thyroid cancer. Menstrual cycle disorders after therapy with iodine-131 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16782093)

The Reaper
08-30-2009, 17:37
Not a medical professional, but IIRC, stress can cause irregular menstruation.

Not that SERE has any of that going on.

TR

NousDefionsDoc
08-31-2009, 11:42
I believe that this concern was sparked by reports of menstruation disorders observed after treatment with I-131, a radioactive isotope used in treating thyroid cancer. Menstrual cycle disorders after therapy with iodine-131 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16782093)

No, it was sparked by a question from a student. Are you a medic?

armymom1228
08-31-2009, 12:29
No, it was sparked by a question from a student. Are you a medic?

NDD, I am nurse, 30 yrs experience.... (my resume, etc)

I admit to no experience with iodine water purification tabs in the questions sense.

I think, personal opinion here, that there are many many factors that I would, as a woman, look at first before I would blame any tabs for my missed or scanty periods.

The situation that would, in theory, be using such things can bring on missed periods... I can go on and on for the reasons. I did some more research last night and still came up empty. My usual sources, most of which I posted, don't address that odd question.

I have to ask, though, what prompted that question? Did your student give a reason she might be curious?

Mmm, do you have a manufacturer's name for the tabs? Give it to me and I will try to get a reply from them. I know that they are required, by law, to have on hand any and all side effects from thier product available to the public.
Anne

Sacamuelas
08-31-2009, 14:38
Excess intake can cause either hyper or hypo-thyroidism symptoms. Hypothyroidism seems to be much more likely in most of the literature. Here are a few articles that cover the process. One of the sites I read did mention menstration changes as a side effect, but the likelyhood was extremely low for short duration exposure. Good luck... damn students and their questions.


http://www.ehponline.org/members/2000/108p679-684backer/backer-full.html

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/patient-iodine.html

armymom1228
08-31-2009, 14:59
Excess intake can cause either hyper or hypo-thyroidism symptoms. Hypothyroidism seems to be much more likely in most of the literature. Here are a few articles that cover the process. One of the sites I read did mention menstration changes as a side effect, but the likelyhood was extremely low for short duration exposure. Good luck... damn students and their questions.




well duh! I missed the thryroid option there completely. :o

NDD? The Army using the iodine tabs? All the searching I did for "water purification tabs" came up with Chlorine Dioxide in the tabs rather than iodine.

HowardCohodas
08-31-2009, 15:26
No, it was sparked by a question from a student. Are you a medic?

I'm not a medic. Just in a family with lots of doctors and nurses. I came across this concern when I had a suspected thyroid problem and was listening in on a conversation in the waiting room.

Cynic
09-01-2009, 19:19
I'm not a medic and have never worked with water purification. I am an RN with a BSN and considerable clinical curiosity.

I'm wondering if the questioner was intending to source iodine as a causative agent in precipitating menstruation, or if the questioner was trying to determine if iodine was an effective agent in removing EDC's from water.

The EPA did a study http://www.epa.gov/ppcp/projects/evaluation.html on water purification methods and their efficacy at removing EDCs (endocrine disruptive chemicals). EDC's could have an effect on menarche in females. There are steroids from agricultural use that find their way into the water as well as medication waste but this is generally in urban areas.

Bottom line, I don't believe iodine is an effective filter for EDCs if that is the questioner's "question". A healthy body is basically very good at maintaining a steady level of iodine despite excessive or limited intake. I don't see it as a trigger for hormonal imbalance unless the subject already has a problem.

Just my observations, YMMV. :)

Pete
09-01-2009, 19:52
My bottle of Civilian "Iodine" tabs reads

"Tetraglycine Hydroperiodide....16.7%
.Other ingredients.....................83.7%

Each Tablet contains 6.68% Titratable Iodine..."

Only cautions on the inner lable are not to eat it and wash hands before handling anything you put in your mouth. If swallowed sip water and call the local poison control number.

Standard instructions - two tabs per quart, a loose cap, shake and wait 30 minutes.

The second bottle that removes the iodine taste is listed as "Active Ingredient - Asorbic Acid 45 mg per tablet.

Richard
09-01-2009, 20:03
The effects of either too much iodine or too little idoine on the human body are well documented and must always be considered. ;)

Richard's $.02 :munchin

NousDefionsDoc
09-01-2009, 21:03
The effects of either too much iodine or too little idoine on the human body are well documented and must always be considered. ;)

Richard's $.02 :munchin

What the hell? You're a Bravo aren't you?;)

NousDefionsDoc
09-01-2009, 21:05
I'm not a medic. Just in a family with lots of doctors and nurses. I came across this concern when I had a suspected thyroid problem and was listening in on a conversation in the waiting room.

Ok, I forgive you. You need to read the special rules for this forum. Also just for future reference, there is no need to assume with me. I post exactly what I mean.

Have a nice day.

NousDefionsDoc
09-01-2009, 21:06
Thanks Jawbreaker.

Don't we have a endocryn...endocrino...thyroid doctor on here?

Richard
09-01-2009, 21:09
What the hell? You're a Bravo aren't you?;)

Yep - 91B4S. :p

Richard

trunkmonkey
09-08-2009, 14:01
NDD,
I do have some limited experience with females and water purification tablets. My wife and I were both in the Army, stationed in Iraq and Alaska together. My wife has used the civilian water purification tablets to purify Iraqi house water for extended periods of time (2 weeks), and Alaskan river water (3 months) and neither has caused her any problems. We also both use the tablets when we go hunting and still no issue using them for her.


And to calrify the married deployment thing. I met her in Baghdad while she was pumping rounds through a car windshield on a patrol. You know what they say, a family that fights together stays together.

shr7
10-16-2009, 01:43
The effects of either too much iodine or too little idoine on the human body are well documented and must always be considered. ;)

Richard's $.02 :munchin

First, I apologize for coming late to the party, been away for a short while.

Both hypo and hyperthyroidism can result in early menstruation.

So then remains the question, can iodine water purification tablets result in altered thyroid function? I looked for studies to link, but now that I'm out of school, they cut me off for the full length articles. I will link to the abstracts and I am sure you have better access to journals than myself.

Early study (1993) in Military Medicine noting abnormal lab values:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8108021?ordinalpos=15&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

There is also an article, 'Travelers' thyrotoxicosis'. Transitory thyrotoxicosis induced by iodinated preparations for water purification. But I cannot link full article and I see "Erratum in" and "Comment in" cited on PubMed, but again cannot read said errors or comments, so I did not link this article.

Cross-Sectional survey of Peace Corps workers in Africa noting abnormal lab values and goiter, resolving upon removal of excess iodine (This was due to excess iodine from a water filter):
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12466344?ordinalpos=7&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

A study conducted looked at short term and long-term effects of iodinated water in the US Space Program. Conclusions were that therapeutic doses of iodine were consumed, enough for a transient change in thyroid function, but no long term effects were found:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11086666?ordinalpos=8&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

I could not find any direct evidence to answer this student's question, but enough evidence exists to extrapolate findings to:
Has it ever happened? "Maybe"
Could it happen? "I don't see why not"

Maybe that is a lesson in itself.

SR