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JihadJilson
03-13-2009, 17:46
The link didn't transfer correctly, so am attemtping to find it but heres the deal, was sent this link from CSM (ret) Zets, he's checking out SFA for background on this newest A$$ clown who is wearing his Class A uniform in the picture giving a speach to Jackson State University about the Army's Don't Ask Don't Tell Policy.

BG Repass already knows about this hero and is inquisitive to his legitimacy.

In the photo he is sporting the older Blue and Yellow wing backing, MSM, ARCOM, Kuwaiti Liberation Medal, and others, 82nd Combat Patch, SF TAB and Patch minus the Airborne Tab.

"retired SF Soldier, SSG (ret.) James Walker, talking in uniform to Jackson State University students about the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy."

IF ANYONE FINDS THE LINK PLEASE POST - THANKS

Pete
03-14-2009, 07:22
http://www.annistonstar.com/news/as-news.htm

It was in the Anniston Star on 03-13-2009. Click on the link and drag down to the 13th. It's one of those newspapers that you have to be registered to check out old stories. I ain't registered.

Edited to add a picture link and part of the story

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/1103/lambiephi/Misc/20090313walker1annn.jpg


"He was among the most elite Special Forces soldiers in the U.S. Army. Trained expertly in explosives, he was a motivated weapon of war and deployed twice to the Middle East during the first Gulf War. Commanding officers praised his professional performance and noted his distinction among his peers. But a gay Green Beret in a "don't ask, don't tell" Army walked a different kind of minefield.

Retired Staff Sgt. James Walker, of Lincoln, brought the story of his disrupted career in the Army to about 20 students, residents and members of JSU Students for Equality, a straight and Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) alliance group."

The story mentions explosives (18C ?) and "twice to the Middle East" during the first Gulf War. I think his highest award is an MSM (?) and on the right side just along the edge of his sleeve a bit of red. No CIB/CMB - even the 18s at Gp HQ got CIBs. Most of the 18 series I know that went, went and stayed put.

Tons of HQs were all over the place though. Lots of people put in time running a desk and came home when it was all over. No shame in that, everybody is a little cog on one of Big Army's wheels. Need all the wheels to keep the machine running.

His life story just reads a little more than what might be there.

Richard
03-14-2009, 09:55
Reservist? Retired SSG and lots of ribbons below the NDSM. Whether he is or isn't, at least he wears the uniform properly. ;)

Wonder if he's an anti- Proposition 8 type? :rolleyes:

Richard's $.02 :munchin

Stras
03-15-2009, 18:33
Jihad and I looked at this, and don't see an airborne tab between the SF Tab and patch. He's got the old SF Wing backing (yellow and blue), no nametag, missing the Southwest Asia Service Medal, and appears to have an 82nd combat patch. I can't tell what the ribbon is above his overseas service ribbon, but the rest of his fruit salad is all in order. No CIB or CMB???? Gulf war service awards were National Defense Service Medal, Southwest Asia Service Medal, Liberation of Kuwait Medal (Saudi Arabia), and Liberation of Kuwait Medal (Kuwait).

retired SSG.... I don't know of any SF Retired SSG between 1993 and present.. unless he was medically retired.

There are certain functions that are spelled out in AR 670-1 with regards to the wear of the uniform by retirees. I seriously doubt that this is one of the occasions authorized to wear a military uniform. (just my humble opinion)

Perhaps "adminstratively eliminated" is code for Medical Board for BROKE BACK....

Here's the full article:
Lincoln man brings his story of the Army's 'don't ask, don't tell' policy to Jax State
By Nick Cenegy
Staff Writer
03-13-2009

Retired Staff Sgt. James Walker of Lincoln shares the story of his disrupted career in the Army. Walker says he was 'administratively eliminated' after a fellow soldier competing with him for one slot in a special program reported him to commanders.
He was among the most elite Special Forces soldiers in the U.S. Army. Trained expertly in explosives, he was a motivated weapon of war and deployed twice to the Middle East during the first Gulf War. Commanding officers praised his professional performance and noted his distinction among his peers. But a gay Green Beret in a "don't ask, don't tell" Army walked a different kind of minefield.
Retired Staff Sgt. James Walker, of Lincoln, brought the story of his disrupted career in the Army to about 20 students, residents and members of JSU Students for Equality, a straight and Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) alliance group.
The alliance, only a semester old, aims to provide a safe and supportive environment for LGBT students and their allies, said the Rev. Patrick Clines, the group's coordinator.
In his uniform decorated during his Army years Walker told the group, gathered on the 11th floor of Jacksonville State University's Houston Cole Library, that the military policy of willful ignorance ruins people's lives.
"It forces people into lives of dishonesty, mocking military traditions," Walker said.
The Pentagon's "don't ask, don't tell" policy was instituted after President Bill Clinton tried to lift the ban on gay service members in 1993. It refers to the military practice of not asking recruits their sexual orientation. In turn, service members are banned from saying they are gay or bisexual, engaging in homosexual activity or trying to marry a member of the same sex. What constitutes engaging in that type of behavior or what the military refers to as a "propensity or intent" for that behavior is left to military court martial boards to decide.
"This is the only job in the U.S. where you can be fired for being gay," Walker said.
By 2007 the military discharged 12,000 service members under the policy, he said.
According to the Pentagon, the number fired each year dropped sharply after the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan, when forces were stretched thin. Whereas more than 1,200 were dismissed in 2000 and again in 2001 for violating the policy, about half as many — 627 — were fired in 2007.
The Pentagon has not released its 2008 figures.
Commanders are different but many are not inclined to give up a good soldier. All are required, however, to investigate alleged homosexual activity.
Walker said he was "administratively eliminated" after a fellow soldier competing with him for one slot in a special program reported him to commanders.
While he was under investigation by the Army for homosexual activity he broke his back on a nighttime parachute jump.
Walker said the other soldiers in his unit went so far as to go to his apartment to bring his partner back to the hospital.
"A lot of guys in the unit knew I was gay, thought I was gay, had some suspicions, but we were all professionals. I dedicated myself to being a professional soldier and sexual orientation was not a big part of that," he said.
The White House has said in recent weeks President Barack Obama has begun consulting with Defense Secretary Robert Gates and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Michael Mullen on how to lift the ban. But the administration won't say how soon that might happen or whether a group of experts will be commissioned to study the issue in-depth, as some Democrats have suggested.
Likewise, Democratic leaders on Capitol Hill support repealing the ban but have not promised to press the issue immediately.
The Army fired 11 soldiers in January for violating the military's policy that gay service members must keep their sexuality hidden, according to a Virginia congressman.
Democratic Rep. Jim Moran said he has requested monthly updates from the Pentagon on the impact of the policy until it is repealed.
Walker, unlike many, managed to retire from the service. Army prosecutors opted to drop the charges against him. If he had been court martialled he would have lost his veterans benefits, he said.
Walker said he believes that it was because he was a Green Beret in a time when the media was abuzz with the topic.
An outed serviceman in such a high-profile special forces group would have garnered a lot of media attention, he said.
Though soldiers are still being fired for their sexuality, Walker said trends in the public and political realms are leading in a positive direction.
"We have always maintained ourselves as a country of equality and freedom. Society is not crumbling because gays and lesbians are serving in the military," Walker said.
At the same time, he said, some moves from the Pentagon have been baffling.
Recently the Army lowered its recruiting standards to include those with some criminal histories.
"They will take a felon over a gay or lesbian," Walker said.
The Associated Press contributed to this story.

Mitch
03-15-2009, 19:04
After a bit more snooping, got this from the School's Paper - it provides links to his educational background:



Retired Special Forces Engineer to Present Review of
Don't Ask Don't Tell: One Soldier's Story

As the face and composition of the US Army has changed and evolved over the years to reflect the diversity of our culture and society, the meeting on Thursday, March 12, at 7 p.m. on the 11th floor of the Houston Cole Library (Room 1103) will be another opportunity for students to learn, to listen, to think, and to put a face and a story with an issue.

A Review of Don't Ask Don't Tell: One Soldier's Story will be presented by retired US Army Special Forces 18c (Engineer) James Walker. Mr. Walker holds a Masters Degree from Fuller Seminary in Theology, and is currently working on his second master's degree. He will relate his experience of being one of the first investigated under Don't Ask, Don't Tell, including how his fellow soldiers helped him and his partner when he was injured, and will give some information from Servicemen's Legal Defense Network, American Veterans For Equal Rights - AVER, Human Rights Campaign (HRC) and Lambda Legal Defense Network.

The climate of this event will be presentation and a question and answer session afterwards. This is not a protest, a rally, or a politically hostile environment.

For more information, contact Patrick Clines.


http://www.jsu.edu/news/Jan-June2009/03092009e.html


Submit items for news releases by using the request form at www.jsu.edu/newswire/request

Alterflow
03-15-2009, 19:35
Perhaps "adminstratively eliminated" is code for Medical Board for BROKE BACK....




No rush on this or anything, but you owe me a coke. I just spit my last one out of my nose.:eek:

alright4u
03-16-2009, 07:30
https://sovo.com/2008/8-1/news/national/8944.cfm

He seems to relish pushing his gay preference. He is damn lucky he was injured before AR-635-200 hit him with a Suitability Board finding. Unless Regs have changed as to wearing a unifrom by retired military, I find him a disgrace for wearing it to this college to push his agenda.

greenberetTFS
03-20-2009, 15:20
https://sovo.com/2008/8-1/news/national/8944.cfm

He seems to relish pushing his gay preference. He is damn lucky he was injured before AR-635-200 hit him with a Suitability Board finding. Unless Regs have changed as to wearing a unifrom by retired military, I find him a disgrace for wearing it to this college to push his agenda.

I too wonder why he's permitted to wear his uniform since he's retired. I only wear my (fatigues) on the Veterans day parade here at home. Maybe I'm just as guilty, I don't know........................:confused:

GB TFS :munchin

Dozer523
03-20-2009, 16:32
A Review of Don't Ask Don't Tell: One Soldier's Story will be presented by retired US Army Special Forces 18c (Engineer) James Walker. Mr. Walker holds a Masters Degree from Fuller Seminary in Theology, and is currently working on his second master's degree. He will relate his experience of being one of the first investigated under Don't Ask, Don't Tell, including how his fellow soldiers helped him and his partner when he was injured, and will give some information from Servicemen's Legal Defense Network, American Veterans For Equal Rights - AVER, Human Rights Campaign (HRC) and Lambda Legal Defense Network.
] Lying is a sin, right?

Team Sergeant
03-20-2009, 17:08
I too wonder why he's permitted to wear his uniform since he's retired. I only wear my (fatigues) on the Veterans day parade here at home. Maybe I'm just as guilty, I don't know........................:confused:

GB TFS :munchin

The butt pirate is not authorized to wear a left shoulder patch, period.


30–3. Wear of the uniform by retired personnel
a. Personnel who will be advanced to a higher grade upon retirement have the option of wearing the insignia of that grade thereafter.
b. Retired personnel on active duty will wear their uniform and insignia in the same manner as prescribed for
personnel in the Active Army of corresponding grade and branch.
c. Retired personnel not on active duty may wear either the uniform reflecting their grade and branch on the date of their retirement, or the uniform for personnel in the Active Army of corresponding grade and branch, when appropriate, but may not intermix the two uniforms. Personnel will wear the grade as shown on the retired grade of rank line on the retirement order.
d. Retired personnel not on active duty are not authorized to wear shoulder sleeve insignia, except as follows:
(1) Personnel performing instructor duties at an educational institution conducting courses of instruction approved 314 AR 670–1 • 3 February 2005
by the Armed Forces will wear the shoulder sleeve insignia of the command that is responsible for the course of instruction. Senior and junior ROTC instructors will wear the Cadet Command shoulder sleeve insignia on their left shoulder (see AR 145–1 and 145–2 for wear of the uniform by senior and junior ROTC instructors, respectively).
(2) Retired personnel are authorized to wear the shoulder sleeve insignia for U.S. Army Retirees on the left
shoulder. The insignia consists of a white cloth disc with a blue border, and an inner white disc with a red border, which bears a blue and white adaptation of the coat of arms of the United States. The outer disk that surrounds the coat of arms contains the inscription “UNITED STATES ARMY” in red letters at the top, and the word “RETIRED” in blue letters at the bottom (see fig 30–1).
(3) Retired personnel may wear the shoulder sleeve insignia for former wartime service (SSI–FWTS) on the right
shoulder if they were authorized wear of the SSI–FWTS while on active duty.
e. Retired personnel not on active duty are not authorized to wear the Army uniform when they are instructors or responsible for military discipline at an educational institution, unless the educational institution is conducting courses of instruction approved by the Armed Forces.
f. In addition to the occasions for wear listed above, retired personnel are authorized to wear the uniform only on the following occasions. Uniforms for these occasions are restricted to service and dress uniforms; the BDU and physical fitness uniforms will not be worn.
(1) While attending military funerals, memorial services, weddings, inaugurals, and other occasions of ceremony.
(2) Attending parades on national or state holidays, or other patriotic parades or ceremonies in which any active or reserve United States military unit is taking part. Wear of the Army uniform at any other time, or for any other purpose than stated above is prohibited.
g. Retirees are authorized to wear the physical fitness uniform (PFU) or the improved physical fitness uniform
(IPFU) under the following provisions:
(1) May wear the PFU or the IPFU with civilian attire off the installation.
(2) When wearing the PFU or the IPFU as a complete uniform, retirees will—
(a) Wear only authorized accessories corresponding to those worn by personnel of the Active Army.
(b) Keep the sleeves down on the sweatshirt or jacket, the legs down on the pants, and the t-shirt tucked inside the trunks.
(c) Not roll or push up the sleeves of the IPFU sweatshirt or the PFU/IPFU jacket.
(d) Wear the sleeves of the IPFU sweatshirt cuffed or uncuffed; may not cuff the IPFU jacket sleeves.
(e) Wear the black knit cap pulled down snugly on the head, with the bottom edge of the cap folded up; will not roll the edge of the cap. A similar, commercially designed black knit cap is authorized for wear.
h. Pregnant retirees are authorized to wear the t-shirt/sweatshirt outside the trunks/sweatpants.
30–4. Wear of the uniform by former members of the Army
a. Unless qualified under another provision of this regulation, or under the provisions of section 772, title 10, United States Code (10 USC 772), former members of the Army may wear the uniform if they served honorably during a declared or undeclared war, and if their most recent service was terminated under honorable conditions. Personnel who qualify under these conditions will wear the Army uniform in the highest grade they held during such war service, in accordance with 10 USC 772.
b. The uniform is authorized for wear only for the following ceremonial occasions, and when traveling to and from the ceremony or function. Uniforms for these occasions are restricted to service and dress uniforms; the BDU and physical fitness uniforms will not be worn.
(1) When attending military funerals, memorial services, weddings, inaugurals, and other occasions of ceremony.
(2) When attending parades on national or state holidays, or other patriotic parades or ceremonies in which any active or reserve United States military unit is taking part. Wear of the Army uniform at any other time, or for any other purpose than stated above, is prohibited.