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View Full Version : Review: Tactical Tailor Trauma Pack


Maple Flag
06-19-2004, 20:39
Tactical Tailor’s $225 Trauma Pack is at the large end of dedicated medical packs, and focuses it’s design on simplicity and adaptability.

http://www.tacticaltailor.com/products/packs/trauma_pack/

Purpose

Tactical Tailor bills their Trauma Pack as being designed to meet the needs of the tactical medic or EMT. Their website does not post dimensions, but a little work with my wife’s tape measure shows a conservative volume of about 2938 cubic inches, which easily expands to about 3260 cubic inches. Included in that volume is a main compartment of between 2,254 and 2,576 cubic inches and two 342 cubic inch padded external zipper panels with elastic loops and a flat mesh pouch. PALS webbing on both sides of the pack allow for adding additional pouches, increasing volume even further, as well as providing a convenient spot to stash a pair of trauma shears if you’re not worried about snagging hazards or dynamic movement.

Construction

The pack is all Cordura, with the exception of the sewn on pack straps which are 500d nylon. The bag sports very neat stitching lines, with double stitching at key stress points. While not “over built” as some other manufacturers products are, the bag is very solid, and shows no signs of wear despite my being the second owner (original owner was a Canadian Forces medic). Notably, the Trauma Pack is surprisingly light for it’s size. Finished off with heavy-duty coil zippers, compression straps, a removable waist belt, adjustments at the top and bottom of the pack straps, and carry and drag handles, it is nice to see a product that is well built, feature rich, and still pretty light to pick up.

Design Features

I particularly like the Trauma Pack for it’s remarkable versatility. Another example of focusing on multi-purpose mesh pockets for compartmenting, the Trauma Pack consists of 5 medium sized bellow pouches in the main compartment, a large bellow mesh pouch on the inside of the main panel, and a Cordura 342 c.i. zipper pouch with a internal flat mesh pocket also on the inside of the main panel. The outside of the pack has the two aforementioned 342 c.i. padded zipper panel pouches with elastic loops and internal mesh pocket.

In total, this design offers a total of 9 mesh pockets of various sizes, and 3 large zippered panel pockets with a total of 12 elastic loops inside 2 of those. Despite this considerable amount of storage potential, there is still more space above and below the 5 mesh pockets for larger, bulkier items, and the pack is even tall enough (23”) to accept a flattened cervical collar in the hydration slot without any bending or stretching! Also, if you prefer pull out pouches, the mesh pockets can be used as sleeves for these, or can be easily pushed flat out of the way for large piece of equipment. The Trauma Pack really leaves the all the choices to you in ways that other medical packs I’ve worked with don’t approach.

Recommended Improvements

This gets tough, given that this pack rings my bell so well. Still, if I had to throw out a want list, it would be as follows:

-The sides of the pack could be enhanced with a flat SAM splint sized pocket with PALS over the face of the pocket. A slot and retention strap for shears would also be nice, given that the PALS webbing invites shears to be put here anyway.

-The middle lower mesh pocket has the potential to be used as a sleeve for the bottom of an O2 tank. The addition of a retention strap between the upper mesh pockets would help to secure the tank in place and improve the versatility of the main compartment.

-Given the size of the main panel on this panel loader, there is an opportunity to have a full length and width interior sleeve for blankets, MAST/PASG, or other large and reasonably flat items.

-Removable web straps on the top of the pack would allow a coiled climbing rope to be carried, but really, I’m probably getting greedy here.

It should also be noted though that each of these additions will bring with it a trade off in pack weight.

Summary

The Trauma Pack provides a great amount of versatility as a fully featured dedicated medical pack, yet it’s design is not overly specialized, allowing it to easily fit the bill as a rescue pack or general assault sized pack without modification. At $225, this pack offers great versatility with large volume for a middle ground price tag. In my opinion, it’s one of the best values in medical packs out there.

Pictures

http://www.picrack.com/002/other/DSCF0028.JPG

http://www.picrack.com/002/other/DSCF0030.JPG

http://www.picrack.com/002/other/DSCF0031.JPG

http://www.picrack.com/002/other/DSCF0032.JPG

http://www.picrack.com/002/other/DSCF0033.JPG

http://www.picrack.com/002/other/DSCF0034.JPG

The Reaper
06-19-2004, 20:44
Excellent work AGAIN, Maple Leaf.

We may have to put you on the payroll for this.

How do you rate it against the others?

When you are done with the descriptive reviews, I would love to see a comparison of the various systems.

Thanks!

TR

NousDefionsDoc
06-19-2004, 21:00
Well done Maple. Keep it up and I'm going to have to edit my review of the TT FRB and Egg Med Leg. You're making me look bad.:D

The Reaper
06-19-2004, 22:21
Originally posted by NousDefionsDoc
Well done Maple. Keep it up and I'm going to have to edit my review of the TT FRB and Egg Med Leg. You're making me look bad.:D

Well, I think he is a college boy.

TR

NousDefionsDoc
06-19-2004, 22:26
Originally posted by The Reaper
Well, I think he is a college boy.

TR

Aaaah!

Solid
06-20-2004, 04:19
That's gotta be this place's longest running joke...

Jack Moroney (RIP)
06-20-2004, 08:08
Now I am way over my head here and am not a medic ("although I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night"). This looks like a neat pack and I am sure for its designed purpose fits the bill for what you would like to have. But, yeah I know here it comes, once you start rummaging thru this and have to move to multiple casualties doesn't this just become another M5 bag with compartments where all this good stuff starts to get scattered from where it was originally designed to be to where ever it might wind up as you move from casualty to casualty?

I know, a stupid question, but my medics used to go nuts trying to find the right configuration of a kit. You all just went thru this with TR and the survival kit and all came up with great kits, all tailored to what you thought you would need. We did sort of the same thing knowing that what we were likely to face were GSW and shrapnel from breaching explosives and burns. What they came up with were several kits. Unlike the bags, these kits opened completely and laid flat so you did not have to rummage thru anything to find whatever you were looking for. The smaller kits opened as a rectangle and carried the initial life saving stuff to stop the bleeding and stabilize the casualty and was left with the casualty for follow on treatment by the follow on medical support. The follow on folks carried a larger kit which opened flat and carried additional medical stuff and paraphenailia to complete the task so the casualty could be evacuated. Both kits could lie open or be hung vertically and all the items were visible thru mesh or lodged in elastic loops without having to open anything. We also selected nomex because of the fire hazards involved with this particular line of work. Of course this was for a very limited type operation but worked well. I guess my point here is that we are always looking for the right bag (ruck, aid bag, ammo pouch, etc) but with such a variety of environments and missions I don't ever see the ideal "one size fits all" ever being developed. We tailor our teams and equipment for missions, why not have the latitude to do the same for all the stuff we need to carry and get away from the cookie cutter approach. Still remember the endless search for a bigger rucksack that eventually will allow everyone to carry an additional amount of "light weight s***".

Jack Moroney

NousDefionsDoc
06-20-2004, 08:41
I guess my point here is that we are always looking for the right bag (ruck, aid bag, ammo pouch, etc) but with such a variety of environments and missions I don't ever see the ideal "one size fits all" ever being developed.

Roger that Sir, it is a quest. In addition, IMO, medicine changes probably more rapidly than any other discipline due to the strong civilian input and lessons learned from the field. Mog changed in a very drastic way my thinking about several things, not the least in the weight category IV fluids. When I went to school it was 2 large bores and squeeze the bag. IV bags weigh a considerable amount when you start adding them up. I have changed my thinking about IVs and now don't need as big a bag. I am currently working out of the TT FRB and leg panel and since I have access to resupply (sort of) I don't carry an aid bag per se as much. Just throw a couple of refill items in my RAID with my snivel gear.

One of my worst fears was always not having the one item I would end up needing and not being able to treat a teammate. So I carried everything I could get my hands on.

52bravo
06-20-2004, 08:56
very good review, nice pic.

what c-collar dit you fit, i use stifneck ho are big/long can it fit one?

Maple Flag
06-21-2004, 18:24
TR: Comparing can be done. Rating is more difficult, depending on one’s criteria for “good” and “bad”. Let me give it some thought.

As for the College Boy – Nope. Virtually all post secondary schooling is technical, tactical, or soft skill development. In other words, I’ve got plenty of certificates, but no diplomas (not necessarily a good thing in my view, but that’s how I’ve played the game of life so far).

NDD: “You're making me look bad” - Nope, and anyone feeling otherwise just isn’t looking at the important stuff…

Jack Moroney: “Both kits could lie open or be hung vertically and all the items were visible thru mesh or lodged in elastic loops without having to open anything.”

Good point Sir, and while I spoke to this feature in my M-4 review, it was an oversight on my part in my recommended improvements for the Trauma Pack. The ability to hang in the open position is a desirable design feature that would benefit this pack. As it is, the interior pouches on the panel side would be upside down if hung.

“I guess my point here is that we are always looking for the right bag (ruck, aid bag, ammo pouch, etc) but with such a variety of environments and missions I don't ever see the ideal "one size fits all" ever being developed. We tailor our teams and equipment for missions, why not have the latitude to do the same for all the stuff we need to carry and get away from the cookie cutter approach.”

I agree that we are unlikely to see a medical pack that fits every person's needs. That said, one of the main things I like in this pack’s design is the fact that this bag is very flexible in terms of whether your want to fill it with removable pouches, or use the included mesh pockets. I've included a photo to support this argument.

52Bravo: Photos of C-collar now included.

All: Yes, I know my pulse Ox case is decidedly non-tactical...

Cheers.

http://www.picrack.com/002/other/Collar 2.JPG

http://www.picrack.com/002/other/Collar 3.JPG

http://www.picrack.com/002/other/POP 1.JPG