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View Full Version : The Colin Powell Poll


Roguish Lawyer
06-13-2004, 19:12
Would he be best as a military commander, diplomat or politician (VP or President)? Why?

Sigi
06-13-2004, 19:35
Powell has fours years to decide.

IMO, Rice and Powell is the ticket in 2008.

Rice vs. Clinton. Hmm, it has a certain ring.

But lets make Bush/Cheney II happen first.

The Reaper
06-13-2004, 19:45
IMHO, GEN Powell was not a particularly gifted general officer. He was promoted to GEN over many other general officers after serving in politically connected positions. He was, however, a "team builder" who worked to resolve the political aspects of military decisions. Unfortunately, he was one of the (if not the primary) advisors who sold Bush 41 on ending Desert Storm with Sadaam still in power. Bad call. We should have overtly supported the Shias and Kurds in their revolts.

His tenure as Secretary of State has been marked by controversy as a member of an administration he has significant disagreements with. While he appears to be a team player, leaks have emerged, to include inappropriate comments in front of the media. He has consistently failed to unite our allies and gain their support for our policies. He would have fit much better in a Democratic administration than in a Republican one, but is not a bad Sec State, nevertheless.

As a potential President or VP, Powell appears to me to be a Democrat essentially everywhere except for the line where he states his political party. While he could be a powerful VP candidate, what would happen in four years when he would be a likely Presidential candidate? I do not think that Powell's positions on a number of key issues would resonate with the conservative Republican base, and the fact that he is an avowed Republican could keep many blacks from voting for him. His candidacy would be a short term fix but a long term nightmare. He would still be better on the ticket than Cheney, who should be the White House Chief of Staff.

Now Rice, I could support!

Just a few thoughts.

TR

Sdiver
06-13-2004, 20:02
TR : Those are some interesting thoughts. In a way, it sounds like you described IKE.

The Reaper
06-13-2004, 20:06
Originally posted by Sdiver
TR : Those are some interesting thoughts. In a way, it sounds like you described IKE.

I always thought Ike was pretty conservative, domestically and in his foreign policy.

TR

Sdiver
06-13-2004, 20:20
Originally posted by The Reaper
I always thought Ike was pretty conservative, domestically and in his foreign policy.

TR

More so than Powell ?

Granted times are MUCH different now, than when IKE was in office.

Jack Moroney (RIP)
06-13-2004, 20:55
Never had much respect for Powell. He was too political to be a good leader but just political enough to be a General Officer. Of course I have never had much use for most generals and can think of only a handful that I thought were worth a damn.

Don't have a lot of use for the DOS either based on my dealings with them over the course of my career, but I really have no way to evaluate the effectiveness of Powell as the head of what I consider to be a whole lot like that feckless peace corps.

As far as president, the lad is a closet democrat.

Jack Moroney

Sigi
06-13-2004, 21:20
Originally posted by Jack Moroney


As far as president, the lad is a closet democrat.

Jack Moroney
From what I hear from conservatives, the Bush administration is closer to Democrats than most past conservative Administrations.

Most Democrats say the current Administration is taking the country further Right than it has ever been.

Not to ignore JM's reference to Powell, I simply wanted to point out the discrepency between both camps.

Republicans do not think he is right enough, and Democrats think he is right of Ganghis Kahn. LOL.

Sorry for the hijack. Is this what we are experiencing politically today?

tache18x
06-14-2004, 00:30
I love Powell, although he's more liberal than I am, he is my inspiration. I've read his autobiography twice. His career has been stellar, he's brilliant, polished, and most of all he loves this country to no end. He's measured in his decisions, he's a very effective uniter, and I believe he has a record just as good or better than any former president. I love W, but let's face it, his prior record can't hold a candle to Powell's. A Rice/Powell ticket would never work, America's not ready for that yet. But, I think he'd make a great president or vp.

brownapple
06-14-2004, 01:35
I met Colin Powell a long-time ago, when I was just a 2d Lieutenant. From that brief meeting and conversation, I will say this:

Colin Powell is an extremely smart man, and he is a leader.

I feel is a better diplomat than military man, and I also feel he is a better diplomat than most diplomats... and that may very well be directly linked to his military experience. He knows when to cut the BS and just say how it is.

Although I don't agree with him politically in many areas, I do think he is a man of character, and I respect him. Yes, he has made mistakes. So have we all.

D9
06-14-2004, 10:32
I voted none of the above.

His orientation towards multilateralism and consensus at all costs disinclines me to believe he would be desirable in any of the above roles.

I agree with The Reaper's assessment of him on all counts.

CPTAUSRET
01-14-2005, 14:47
Just found this thread.

I had a good friend Dennis P H., Dennis served in SF in Oki before he graduated flight school with me in 65. He worked for Powell, I think in Berlin when Powell was a 2Lt, he wasn't too impressed with him at that stage of his military career.

One instance he related; Dennis was a squad leader acting PSG, and he had a real douchebag in his platoon, the kid was always messing up thus getting everyone else in trouble. He was tired of his platoon being restricted to barracks on the weekends because of this kid, he tried everything possible to square the kid away, to no avail. So he conducted a "blanket party", this was many years ago and that probably wouldn't work today...Well it really incensed 2Lt Powell, he wanted Dennis's stripes, he didn't get them but he never forgave Dennis, either.

Terry

Huey14
01-14-2005, 19:10
But on the flip side, he was a brand new LT, I'm sure there must have been many 2LT's who haven't learned at first but got their act together later on?

CPTAUSRET
01-15-2005, 00:24
Sure, just giving a little insight.

NousDefionsDoc
01-15-2005, 01:22
Don't have a lot of use for the DOS either :lifter

Can I be your medic?

Huey14
01-15-2005, 08:53
Sure, just giving a little insight.


Didn't mean to make it sound like I was having a go at you.

CPTAUSRET
01-15-2005, 11:24
Didn't mean to make it sound like I was having a go at you.


Didn't take it that way, just clarifying my post.

Trip_Wire (RIP)
01-15-2005, 15:58
Never had much respect for Powell. He was too political to be a good leader but just political enough to be a General Officer. Of course I have never had much use for most generals and can think of only a handful that I thought were worth a damn.

Don't have a lot of use for the DOS either based on my dealings with them over the course of my career, but I really have no way to evaluate the effectiveness of Powell as the head of what I consider to be a whole lot like that feckless peace corps.

As far as president, the lad is a closet democrat.

Jack Moroney

I agree with what you have said for the most part. (I did sort of like Gen. Patton though! :D) I voted for none of the above, mostly because as you say he is a "closet democrat." Perhaps his best role now, is to enjoy his family & retirement.

My experience working with the DOS on a few occassions, on LE dignitary protection activities left me with a very bad feeling on the operations of this Department and especially some of its bosses. :rolleyes:

uboat509
01-15-2005, 16:43
I voted "none of the above" because I just don't see him in any of those roles any more. He won't be president because the conservitives think that he is a closet democrat and the democrats think that he is either far too conservitive or he is a closet democrat who lacked the courage of his convictions, depending on who you talk to. Either way he is out. He probably won't be a diplomat again because the democrats have made sure to undermine his credibility by pointing out every small ideological disagreement with the president and implying that he does not have the full backing of the White House.
No, what I see him doing is going out on the lecture circuit and doing a lot of time on various news shows as an expert. Quite frankly, I think he is done with the whole thing.

SSG W

Sweetbriar
01-15-2005, 18:59
I voted none of the above. I'm sensing (not the best word, but whatever...) that Powell himself is not at all satisfied with how his term as Sec of State has turned out, yet he is aware of all the apparent conflicts between serving in this Republican administration yet having some fundamental ideological conflicts with neo-conservatism, having risen to power thru his military service yet the next logical step is political power in a country that is popularly considered to be afraid of the military being in power, and of wanting the decision making power of high office yet being disinclined to run for the presidency.

He's too young for true retirement and the lecture circuit, although he'd make a fortune at it. In a way, he is better qualified than either Jimmy Carter or Jesse Jackson for the role of roving, politically unencumbered diplomat. To my mind, Carter has slowly and very unfortunately devolved into a kind of liberal Democratic flake, although he is certainly very intelligent, and his rank as former US president gives him more clout overseas than his wisdom deserves. Jackson... well, no comment required, but he does know how to bring attention to a cause on the worldwide stage.

As to what Powell intends to do or might have marked down on his dream sheet, I have no idea. But I don't think its the barn and the back 40 for long. I give him 18 months maximum before he has a major television interview to announce a new objective. If the Republicans want to keep him sympathetic they need to keep him in the loop and maintain the respect and doors open. I think he's sufficiently frustrated at the moment to consider all sorts of options.

Hmmmmm, what about Colin Powell as the new Sec Gen of the UN? :munchin

Sigi
01-18-2005, 20:52
::hijack::

The more I hear and read about Dr. Rice the more I like her. She sounds like the most qualified and electable American since - well I dont know when. I like her as an American. She stands for everything that is right in America.

And.....well, she received her MBA from Notre Dame. She must be brilliant.

::over::