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frostfire
01-13-2009, 11:47
Gentlemen,

- Does anyone has catchy-succinct presentation material on the topic of dehydration and nutrition, that I can use as a template?
- Please offer me your critique/ideas for my program idea below. Do I miss anything?

Background:
I've been tasked to give a presentation over dehydration in all season and nutrition to a group of ROTC students. Target audience probably ranges from early to late teenagers. I've perused previous topics here and took some material. I've also gathered materials from FM's and health literature. I got those urine color chart for visual aid.

Instead of delivering a complete/elaborate presentation, I am more concerned of delivering an effective one. That is their retaining useful information even if they only pay attention 50% of the time. I am expecting/anticipating ADD. I figure showing them charts and graphs of body surface area to water loss at certain temperature is less effective than telling them "if your urine looks like coca cola, present yourself to the ER." I'm looking for a mantra like "sight alignment, trigger control" that's repeated a few times at the range during coaching so that even if the participants forget the rest of the instruction, they remember that key point. The presentation will be super successful if they remember/understand enough that they can even educate their peers about the topic.

Program idea (rough cut):
- Start with a funny youtube clip related to the topic as icebreaker, attention-grabber etc.
- Win their hearts and minds by telling that regardless of how they see themselves or how others see them, I'll treat them like mature adult. Instead of giving a bunch of do's and dont's, I'll give actions and consequences. So they'd know if they play, they pay. Their choice.
- Questions on what they already know (ie. anybody ever get dehydrated? how do you know?.....if you're thirsty, you already are etc. etc.)
- Definitions
- Symptoms
- Worst case scenario (fear as motivating factor like those pics of severe STD cases in health class)
- Treatment
- Prevention
I'll be sure to address (protein)supplement, multivitamin, creatine, caffeine drinks, high-fructose carbonated drinks, danger of over-hydration etc. For nutrition, I plan to just show different nutrients, their functions in a practical manner, the food groups containing them, empty calories, and the mantra "everything in moderation (and balance)." I'd probably like to throw in some hooaa one-liner throughout the presentation. Also even if this is a military setting, I would have to be politically correct and avoid upsetting anyone who may be obese, overweight, bulemic, etc. To minimize attention deficit and boredom, I figure the presentation should not last more than 45min to an hour

perdurabo
01-13-2009, 14:26
The following info may or may not be of help to you.

For related anecdotal information, check out http://ultrunr.com. While the site caters to an "extreme sport, the site is a wealth of info for hydration and caloric intake in wilderness conditions (many/most ultramarathons take place in the woods).

Stress the importance of checking urine color to gauge hydration. Dark bad, clear good.

Always sip fluids, never chug (chugging floods the body with fluids more quickly than it can be absorbed, which leads to waste)

Constantly sip fluids, the symptoms of dehydration become apparent after its too late.

You want to include the connection between fluid loss and activity, via sweating. If you're dehydrated or calorically-deprived, you don't want to be dancing to Kenny Loggins out in the woods (not that you want to if you're hydrated and calorically-okay either)

I learn best via short catch phrases ala "left loosey, righty tighty". If you don't mind, post your presentation once it's complete, it'd be a great addition to the existing knowledge base here.

x SF med
01-13-2009, 14:39
The best place for water is in your body not your canteen.
a balanced diet is essential to optimum performance. - balance is dependent upon activity and temperature.
Common sense should rule in all situations, if people are not used to working in the field, train them in keeping water in their bodies as they get used to the environment - the worstcase of dehydration I saw was in a Winter Warfare environment... "But, Doc, I didn't feel like I was sweating..." with 2 full 2 qt canteens the guy needed an IV to get the fluids back in him.

cornelyj
01-14-2009, 12:26
Hydration begins days (at least 24 hours) before the event, FTX or movement.

If you just drink allot of water an hour before you go out you'll just have to pee and have to take an unhappy buddy to a tree with you; always right when they finally pick up the pace in the formation run.

play= don't drink till an hour before run.
pay = pushups for being a fallout... but sarge I I I waa wasnt a fall out... :munchin

Additionally as stated "Balance" is key.

perdurabo
01-14-2009, 14:34
The best place for water is in your body not your canteen.

But care must be taken to not drink at a rate more quickly than the body can absorb it, but this is a skill that come from (often harsh) experience.


a balanced diet is essential to optimum performance. - balance is dependent upon activity and temperature.
Common sense should rule in all situations, if people are not used to working in the field, train them in keeping water in their bodies as they get used to the environment - the worstcase of dehydration I saw was in a Winter Warfare environment... "But, Doc, I didn't feel like I was sweating..." with 2 full 2 qt canteens the guy needed an IV to get the fluids back in him.

This is a great note and similar things happen in very dry desert environments where the sweat is being evaporated almost immediately and your clothes are dry.

Me personally, my sweet spot seems to be 32-40 ounces every hour while hiking or running. I'm 6'4 and roughly 230lbs.

Gavin
04-10-2009, 22:21
Anyone every hear of Cera Sport? Seems to be balanced better than Gaytorade.