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reliks
01-07-2009, 16:40
Im getting ready to go to MEPS, and I am in very good condition medically. My one concern is a pilonidal cyst that I have (aka "Jeep disease"). I've had it forever; a sort of birth defect my doctor said. However, it is removable with a 30% chance of it returning. I have gotten it cleared for a DODMERB before, but I was not sure if i would fail the SF medical because of it. I am planning on getting it removed anyway, but I was curious as to whether or not I need to get it done prior to MEPS. Any input is much appreciated. Thanks.

JJ_BPK
01-07-2009, 16:55
Im getting ready to go to MEPS, and I am in very good condition medically. My one concern is a pilonidal cyst that I have (aka "Jeep disease"). I've had it forever; a sort of birth defect my doctor said. However, it is removable with a 30% chance of it returning. I have gotten it cleared for a DODMERB before, but I was not sure if i would fail the SF medical because of it. I am planning on getting it removed anyway, but I was curious as to whether or not I need to get it done prior to MEPS. Any input is much appreciated. Thanks.


Ask your primary Doc,, If it has given you problems in the past and the option is to have it out/off/lanced/drained, why wait..

My brother had his operated on when he was about 16, never came back.

On the flip side,, if it is a prehensile tail,, it could come in handy??? :D:lifter:lifter:D

Good Luck...

olhamada
01-07-2009, 17:10
Look in AR 40-501, 2-28.d(2). You can Google it. Technically, it's disqualifying, but in reality it's a rather minor thing unless it's chronically and actively draining. If post-op, you need 6 months before you are eligible.

comment deleted because it was inappropriate, wrong and advocated dishonest behavior showing poor judgment - Eagle.

Red Flag 1
01-07-2009, 18:29
Im getting ready to go to MEPS, and I am in very good condition medically. My one concern is a pilonidal cyst that I have (aka "Jeep disease"). I've had it forever; a sort of birth defect my doctor said. However, it is removable with a 30% chance of it returning. I have gotten it cleared for a DODMERB before, but I was not sure if i would fail the SF medical because of it. I am planning on getting it removed anyway, but I was curious as to whether or not I need to get it done prior to MEPS. Any input is much appreciated. Thanks.

This was called "Jeep Rider's Disease" since WW II. I have seen this come to the OR with police officers, and State Troopers. I have also seen the same patients more than once in the OR for treament. IMHO, this suggests a chronic condition, as you history suggests. One patient was an "Academy Grad" that was denied a flying assignment for this reason.

IMHO, getting this "removed" can present a surgical difficulty in the end, no pun intended. olhamada has provided insight to the Reg. JJ BPK has a point as well. Your Doc is the one to talk with. Share with you Doc your plans.

I have come to agree with Dozer over time; as he says," this is you life". If SF is your goal, do what you need to to get there! Docs you consult will come down on the side of the best for you in terms of medical outcome.

IMHO, do what you need to to stay in the Pipeline.

My $.02.


RF 1

Eagle5US
01-07-2009, 19:36
Look in AR 40-501, 2-28.d(2). You can Google it. Technically, it's disqualifying, but in reality it's a rather minor thing unless it's chronically and actively draining. If post-op, you need 6 months before you are eligible.

comment deleted because it was inappropriate, wrong and advocated dishonest behavior showing poor judgment - Eagle.

Post one more thing like this and I GUARANTEE you will post here no longer.:mad:

I cannot believe you were a SFG(A) BN SGN and DMO and you are giving this advice.

You are actively advocating concealing a pre-existing medical condition for a potential soldier.

THAT is DISHONEST, shows a lack of character, and is one of my biggest pet peeves. If it's "no big deal" then disclose it and move forward, no worries.

"My recruiter said it was no big deal so I didn't say anything"

That is absolute CRAP and I will not stand for it to be advocated on these boards..ESPECIALLY not in the medical section.
You may not be a recruiter, but you are posting advice that is wrong.

A person must choose to violate their integrity - and once it is gone...it's gone.

To the OP - if it has been disclosed and cleared once already, it should not be a problem for your basic enlistment. I would not advocate attempting Special Operations with a pilonidal cyst, active or not...get it taken care of on Uncle Sam's dime THEN look to see if you are able to attempt SOF training.
If passing an SF physical is your pre-requisite for joining the Army, then you may consider another profession. Not everyone who tries makes it, and those who don't need to be able to accept other assignments within the service.

IF you get into the service and have problems with this cyst, your enlistment physical and declaration will be reviewed. If it is determined that you failed to disclose this, or any other medical condition, it may be listed as EPTS (Existed Prior to Service) which can then end up as a "line of duty NO", you being responsible for part or all of your medical care associated with this problem, AND (if you get a TRUE stickler for the regs and you miss significant amounts of training / duty because of this), a discharge and criminal charge of falsifying your entry medical documents punishable by both jail and a fine (extreme case, yes). I have been that asshole stickler on certain cases in the past when I felt it was necessary and warranted. Not to mention potentially being denied ANY and ALL compensation if there are complications and you are in the military long enough to retire.

Olhamada - you may think I am overly sensitive about this, it is because I am. As a credentialed provider you should know better.

Eagle

Spartan359
01-07-2009, 21:19
Reliks,

I had one before I went in the Navy and thought it was taken care of with the surgery. I had it operated on two more times IN the Navy. I ended up having to have a Z-plasty (sp?) done to it to finally get rid of the damn thing. I got a little scar but I have no problems now and I'm glad to have that damn thing gone.

My advice to you is to get it taken care of. Get the surgery and DO NOT DO ANYTHING for atleast a month. Just rest. I was a knucklehead and never let it heal the first few times and thats why I had to have the Z-plasty done. After the first month then I would suggest doing light work for two months (thats what I had to do). After that you should be clear to getting on with normal life. Thats my experience with it and .02.

olhamada
01-07-2009, 23:09
You are actively advocating concealing a pre-existing medical condition for a potential soldier.

THAT is DISHONEST, shows a lack of character, and is one of my biggest pet peeves. If it's "no big deal" then disclose it and move forward, no worries.

...you are posting advice that is wrong.

A person must choose to violate their integrity - and once it is gone...it's gone.

As a credentialed provider you should know better.

Eagle


Eagle, when I first read your response and saw your edit, I was a bit steamed - well, actually more than a bit. But you are right, and I stand corrected. Please accept my apology. Character and integrity are very important, and you are correct, they are too precious to squander. In fact, that's something I preach all the time. Thanks for keeping me accountable.

Eagle5US
01-08-2009, 02:04
Eagle, when I first read your response and saw your edit, I was a bit steamed - well, actually more than a bit. But you are right, and I stand corrected. Please accept my apology. Character and integrity are very important, and you are correct, they are too precious to squander. In fact, that's something I preach all the time. Thanks for keeping me accountable.
Thank you, Sir, for being open and understanding / receptive to my constructive criticism. This is a true test of character - for which you have shown brightly.

We stand as one.

v/r
Eagle

Soft Target
01-08-2009, 08:03
I had mine opened up in '76 but wound up having it drained for a while with no recurrences. It didn't hinder me when, less than two years later, I went through SFOC; but things were different back then, I guess. (OK, no FOG comments).

reliks
01-08-2009, 15:15
Thanks so much for all of your input. To clarify myself on a few points, i am going to sign a REP-63 contract, thats why I am worried about the SF medical already. Also, I already have medical insurance that will cover the removal, so its more a matter of timing than money. As it stands now, I would RSP until August (after my semester of school ends) then start the pipeline, but I want to make sure I have enough time to recover and still be in peek physical shape. So I would prefer to sign ASAP to begin drill with the RSP, but (and correct me if I am wrong) its sounding like I MUST get it taken care of prior to signing. Once again, I appreciate all of your help and .02 cents. Thanks!

Dozer523
01-08-2009, 23:46
I have come to agree with Dozer over time; as he says," this is you life". If SF is your goal, do what you need to to get there! Docs you consult will come down on the side of the best for you in terms of medical outcome.

IMHO, do what you need to to stay in the Pipeline.

My $.02.
RF 1
thanks, The gyros were starting to spin!:)

Beach Bum
01-09-2009, 08:47
I work with people every day who think that something that is "no big deal" does not need to be disclosed to their healthcare providers. Your medical history is important to those who are providing you care, related to a current ailment or not! Besides, it is worth the reprocussions of lying on your paperwork.

Dozer523
01-09-2009, 11:12
I work with people every day who think that something that is "no big deal" does not need to be disclosed to their healthcare providers. Your medical history is important to those who are providing you care, related to a current ailment or not! Besides, it is worth the reprocussions of lying on your paperwork.
If only, Beachbum. If only medical providers didn't have the power to "GO/NOGO a guys career / life because of what is written in a book or manual or regulation.
Awwwww Crap! Here I go again. Beachbum, here is the thing that I'm not sure you get, the thing that "they" don't get. . . I don't need or want you or "they" to protect me from myself. If I wanted to live a life that involved no risk to me now, next week or next year I would not have chosen to be a soldier. And certainly not a Special Forces Soldier. Everytime I train or deploy I am well aware of the risk that I might get hurt or cause some damage that will haunt me sometime in the future. Generally my training protects me -- someone had been in the exact same situation once before and figured it out -- then shared that knowledge. (Oh, like maybe we could have a really cool website that QP's could go to and post and share stuff? Hey! and we could let young guys getting ready to go through the training read it too. Yeah! Why didn't I think of that? Well . . . hell. Since we're gonna do that, let's just let everyone read it . . . ) Generally, my experience helps too. When I didn't do what the Team Sargeant told me to (or did what the Team Sargeant told me might not be a good idea . . . "DON'T DO THAT, DUMBASS!") I usually thought "OHHHH That's why he said that" as the 18D said "That's gonna leave a mark." My teammates cover me, too. As we get older, we get wiser. We also learn to compensate for ourselves and our brothers. At 35-45 we don't all run or ruck like we did at 25 but we get the job done faster, easier and get away better. (The young guys like to think about actions on the objective the old guys like to think about extraction.) OLD teams get the hard job; young teams get the jobs "for the experience" of it.
I am offended when "they" tell me "they" don't think I can do what "they" have never done, or will ever do, or even want to do. Please, don't tell me "no". You may advise me that "because of this condition you might want to . . . " But don't dare tell me that because of one thing none of my million other things can't keep me in the fight. When I suspect I might endanger the mission or the team then I'll talk it over with the team. Maybe weakness in one area doesn't negate strengths in other areas. Maybe the Team will decide to compensate. Trust me. When a Teammatee knows he can't anymore he won't.
These are the lives we are given (blessed with) what we do with them is our responsibility (gift). We are what we are (that is the challenge). If we expect / demand / require perfection in ourselves and our brothers we will never achieve excellence. 30 years from now, no one will remember that you didn't get to do what you always wanted to.
Except you, every day.
Don't lie, but don't help get get something you don't want. .02

The Reaper
01-09-2009, 11:26
I think integrity is important in a soldier, and even more so in a team mate.

At one point, the Marines were so desperate for enlistees that recruiters were telling kids with diabetes to lie about it. They told them that the food in the Corps would treat their disease. Obviously, that was discovered when the kids went into diabetic disorders at Basic Training.

It is not your place to be selectively revealing, or not revealing aspects of your medical history to the recruiter or MEPS Physician. Lay it all out, be familiar with AR 40-501, and let them tell you what they think.

Maybe I am the minority, but I could not live with myself if some medical issue I concealed cause my team to fail to accomplish their mission, a buddy to be hurt, or someone else, like the aircrew who has to come haul your ass off of a mountain when you break down.

Tell the truth and let the consequences follow. Anyone who tells you otherwise is not acting in your, or your potential teammates' best interest.

Just my .02, YMMV.

TR

Peregrino
01-09-2009, 17:54
D- Passionately argued, but you're overlooking a critical component. It's a "double standards" world. You're telling someone on the outside trying to get in what we've all told teammates who have proven their mettle (and know how the calculus works). It's not about fair, it's all about risk assessment and return on investment. If Reliks gets his stuff fixed and heals properly (so that he meets the medical standards) he gets his chance. Otherwise, as we've already pointed out - it's an integrity issue, not to mention selfish. My .02.

Red Flag 1
01-09-2009, 19:24
This thread has grown a bit. That having been said, it must have been necessary. Eagle5 has really outlined the bottom line for medical providers on this board. His point is well understood without question for medical providers, and may be restating the obvious.

From my point of view, this site is by and for the 18's, medical or otherwise. From my narrow prespective, medical views from providers have generally been spot on. As a group, medics will come down with the best advice and guidance from medical viewpoint. That impact can be lost on providers with no active military experience. I learned this when seeing sick-call in the mid '70s. Declaring someone too ill to work was not an edict from on high, it was a reccommendation to a commander in the field. The field commander was not bound by my opinion, quite a wakeup for me! This has given me some prespective, and helps me understand Dozer a bit better. Having had some brief time with the 20 th, also has given me some insight. Beach Bum may have blundered in with good intentions and meaning no harm. BB's advice seems sound and well intended.

IMHO, a key here may be in how to frame a care plan with the wishes and needs of the soldier and his commander/military carrer in mind. Folks in the pipeline may have a problem that kicks them out of the pipeline without question. Others may be looking for a "way out". Others will have issues that can be worked with, and still remain in the pipeline. If SF is your goal, make that known to your Doc. Work to the common goal to resolve issues and remain in the pipeline. If what you have is a DQ, so be it; move on to plan B. Non disclosure of medical issues will bite you in the end, as well as hamper medical care.

The value of honesty can not be stated better than Eagle5, and others have pointed out. From the providers here.....well it should never be an issue at all.

My $.02.


RF 1