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Sdiver
10-31-2008, 01:01
With the Holidays fast approaching, many of us will be getting together with family and friends. Many of whom are "getting up in years". Here are some helpful ways we can help determine if someone we know, or don't know, is possibly suffering from a Stroke or Heart Attack.

STROKE

A stroke is the rapidly developing loss of brain functions due to a disturbance in the blood vessels supplying blood to the brain. This can be due to ischemia (lack of blood supply) caused by thrombosis or embolism or due to a hemorrhage. As a result, the affected area of the brain is unable to function, leading to inability to move one or more limbs on one side of the body, inability to understand or formulate speech or inability to see one side of the visual field. In the past, stroke was referred to as cerebrovascular accident or CVA, but the term "stroke" is now preferred.

A stroke is a medical emergency and can cause permanent neurological damage, complications and death. It is the leading cause of adult disability in the United States and Europe. It is the number two cause of death worldwide and may soon become the leading cause of death worldwide. Risk factors for stroke include advanced age, hypertension (high blood pressure), previous stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), diabetes, high cholesterol, cigarette smoking and atrial fibrillation. High blood pressure is the most important modifiable risk factor of stroke.

TIA

A transient ischemic attack (TIA, often colloquially referred to as “mini stroke”) is caused by the changes in the blood supply to a particular area of the brain, resulting in brief neurologic dysfunction that persists, by definition, for less than 24 hours; if symptoms persist then it is categorized as a stroke.


Symptoms vary widely from person to person, depending on the area of the brain involved. The most frequent symptoms include temporary loss of vision (typically amaurosis fugax); difficulty speaking (aphasia); weakness on one side of the body (hemiparesis); and numbness or tingling (paresthesia), usually on one side of the body. Impairment of consciousness is very uncommon.

How to Recognize a Stroke

Think F.A.S.T. or the Cincinnati Stroke Scale.

F....or Facial droop
Have the person smile. Is one side of their face "drooping", or not moving?

A....or Arm Drift.
Have the person close their eyes. Hold their Arms straight out, palms up for about 10 seconds. Does one arm drift downwards?

S....Speech
Have the person repeat a simple sentence, like......"You can't teach an old dog new tricks."
Is there any slurring in their speech.

T....Time
If you can recognize these signs early enough, call 911 immediatly.

For an example, click this link....

http://www.strokecenter.org/trials/scales/cincinnati.html


Heart Attacks

Heart Attack Warning Signs
Some heart attacks are sudden and intense — also called, the "movie heart attack," where no one doubts what's happening. But most heart attacks start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort. Often people affected aren't sure what's wrong and wait too long before getting help. Here are signs that can mean a heart attack is happening:

Chest discomfort.
Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain.

Discomfort in other areas of the upper body. Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach.

Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort.

Other signs may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness

As with men, women's most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort. But women are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting, and back or jaw pain.

Learn the signs, but remember this: Even if you're not sure it's a heart attack, have it checked out (tell a doctor about your symptoms). Minutes matter! Fast action can save lives — maybe your own. Don’t wait more than five minutes to call 9-1-1.

Calling 9-1-1 is almost always the fastest way to get lifesaving treatment. Emergency medical services (EMS) staff can begin treatment when they arrive — up to an hour sooner than if someone gets to the hospital by car. EMS staff are also trained to revive someone whose heart has stopped. Patients with chest pain who arrive by ambulance usually receive faster treatment at the hospital, too. It is best to call EMS for rapid transport to the emergency room.

If you can't access the emergency medical services (EMS), have someone drive you to the hospital right away. If you're the one having symptoms, don't drive yourself, unless you have absolutely no other option.


Remember, when it comes to ANY dealing with cardiac issues.....TIME IS MUSCLE !!!!

JJ_BPK
10-31-2008, 05:37
Thanks,,

This will make a good shot-gun note to all my FOG in-laws & out-laws,, and their kids..

greenberetTFS
10-31-2008, 06:24
Thanks,Sdiver........I printed it out and have it pinned to the kitchen cork board. :)

GB TFS :munchin

Dan
10-31-2008, 06:36
Lesson Learned the hard way last year; not all hospitals carry the time-sensitive stroke medication. If you have someone that is a stroke candidate and you have more than one local hospital, find out which hospital stocks the medication.

82ndtrooper
10-31-2008, 11:09
Lesson Learned the hard way last year; not all hospitals carry the time-sensitive stroke medication. If you have someone that is a stroke candidate and you have more than one local hospital, find out which hospital stocks the medication.


Are you referring to this drug ?

Tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA)


If your doctors determine that you have had an ischemic stroke (non-hemorrhagic), you may be a good candidate to receive a clot-busting medication known as tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). This drug must be given within 3 hours of the onset of your symptoms. People who receive tPA are 50% more likely to recover from their stroke than people who do not receive tPA. The drug is given as an intravenous (IV) infusion over 1 hour and if you receive the drug, you will need to be watched closely in an intensive care unit setting for at least 24 hours.

Important facts about tPA:

tPA must be given within 3 hours of symptom onset; you may not receive tPA if you awaken with your symptoms since it is impossible to tell when your symptoms started.
You must have a CT scan before you receive tPA; it must be clear that you have not had bleeding in or around your brain before receiving tPA.
You may not receive tPA if you have bleeding problems or are on blood thinners such as warfarin (Coumadin®).
The sooner you receive tPA, the better your chance of recovery.

f50lrrp
10-31-2008, 11:54
tPA is a God Send! In May I had a Stroke and my 25 YO daughter called 911, immediately. Within an hour I was at the E.R. being treated. I spent 8 weeks in a hospital (3 weeks of treatment and 5 weeks of Speech, Physical and Occupational Therapy.) I was discharged with a cane and a brace on my right leg.

I went back for "Out-Patient" therapy and spent another nine weeks going back three times a week. When I finished I was 45 pounds lighter than I had been prior to the stroke, I was talking in complete sentences, and I was running without the cane or the brace.

I have recovered about 90% of my pre-stroke abilities.

Dan
10-31-2008, 11:57
Are you referring to this drug ?

Tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA)

Yes

Gypsy
10-31-2008, 20:18
As with men, women's most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort. But women are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting, and back or jaw pain.

Remember, when it comes to ANY dealing with cardiac issues.....TIME IS MUSCLE !!!!


Thank you Sdiver. There's another symptom for women not mentioned above, having had a heart attack this past March I never would have guessed this to be a symptom. My heart attack was like a case of severe heartburn. That's it. No chest pains, arm pain, shortness of breath...none of it. Just a really, really bad heartburn that lasted for almost 6 hours.

To this day I don't know what made me go to the doctor the following day instead of blowing it off and going to work. I'm glad I did, my doctor knew almost immediately and did an EKG right in the office before I wound up in the hospital for an angioplasty.

As a footnote, after many healthy changes instituted I'm happy to report my heart muscle has repaired itself to within 5% of normal only 7 months after my MI.

Razor
10-31-2008, 23:30
Thank you Sdiver. There's another symptom for women not mentioned above, having had a heart attack this past March I never would have guessed this to be a symptom. My heart attack was like a case of severe heartburn. That's it. No chest pains, arm pain, shortness of breath...none of it. Just a really, really bad heartburn that lasted for almost 6 hours.

Gypsy, when my dad had a heart attack several years ago (he got lucky and not only survived, but had no lasting effects), he described his primary symptom as a bad case of heart burn as well. As he had a long history of acid reflux and ulcers, it took a little while before he acted on it. Like I said, he was very lucky he had the outcome he did.

Remington Raidr
11-01-2008, 05:39
I am not a med guy, but in a previous life was a 911 dispatcher. If the person is diabetic they should not ignore the onset of any symtoms. Sometimes, due to nerve damage, no chest pain, etc. until it is too late, or so I have been told.:eek:

Gypsy
11-01-2008, 12:43
Gypsy, when my dad had a heart attack several years ago (he got lucky and not only survived, but had no lasting effects), he described his primary symptom of a bad case of heart burn as well. As he had a long history of acid reflux and ulcers, it took a little while before he acted on it. Like I said, he was very lucky he had the outcome he did.

Razor, glad your father did so well! With his history I can see where he could have thought it was more along the line of acid reflux. I should have known something was up with me, I think I've had heartburn maybe twice in my life.

DaveMatteson
01-25-2011, 13:17
In the last 2 years of my career I was deployed for Noble Eagle I and II from September of 2002 to January of 2004. During this time I had chronic chest discomfort and heart burn. I ignored the condition because we were unfortunately stuck eating at a mess hall which was in fact just a cafeteria where the employees of the AAD bought their fried foods.

After I retired in April of 2004 I donned my WWII infantry uniforms for a Memorial Day event. I grabbed my M1 Garand which I promptly dropped. I picked it up again and my hands went weak and I dropped it again. My hands continued to shake. I grabbed my carbine, changed webgear and went to the ceremony.

Some nights I would wake up in cold sweats, bad dreams, or a dull constant pressure in my chest. I would take Advil, watch TV then go back to bed.

I started having vision problems in 2001. My eyes would cross or go out of focus. One eye would weep constantlly. I would have "eye headaches" that would make me lose concentration.

I started getting a numbness in my arms and across the top of my chest. At times it would feel that everything in my upper body had fallen asleep.

On the morning of August 13th (yep a friday) 2004, and after months of my wife telling me to go to the doctor, I was on my way to the apartment complex dumpster to throw the trash out ( I worked part time for my complex while I worked for NASA Security to keep my rent down). I got to about 15 feet of the dumpster and tossed one bag in and at that moment with the physicalness of the toss I went blind. I dropped the bag and fell to the ground. Knowing my orientation I stood and made my way back to the garage that I worked from. As my vision became a little better and I could make out shapes I finally got to the maintenance office and sat down in front of the fan.

When my vision finally returned I stood with a massive pain in my chest and started walking to the county sheriff's car. Never made it. My boss pulled up grabbed me and tossed me in the back seat. He saw I was in distress and my skin color of gray did not make it any harder to see the stress.

I was diagnosed with 4 clogged arteries 1 at 70% while 3 were at 100%. I received a triple bypass on the 18th of August. I went into what I was going through in length because not everyone feels the same symptoms although thet are similar. I was lucky and caught it before the massive heart attack that my doctor told me I was destined for had I let this go another 2 days.

Becareful. Check your heart while your getting your personal doc to throw a band-aid on that splinter you got in the yard. 2 guys I worked with came to me and asked what it felt like, I told him everything above and 8 weeks later he had a bypass the other guy was admitted to the hospital months later and passed away though I know he was having heart issues I do not know how he passed away.

Take care of yourself and get regular check ups. One thing I remember clearly was my doctor telling me that he was suprised that a guy my size (5'9) at my weight (197) had such a young and healthy heart. He asked if I worked out I told him that I had just retired from the Military...he smiled, "yup, that will do it!"


Dave

Gypsy
01-25-2011, 18:35
Dave, glad to hear things turned out ok for you...but ignoring chest pains and numbness/tingling are two things I'm sure you won't do again! :eek:

DaveMatteson
01-26-2011, 10:52
:D Nope...never again! When I feel uncomfortable I make an appointment. One thing I should have pointed out though, if you have a grandparent or a parent for that matter that passed away of has had a heart attack, bypass, or has passed on due to heart disease or other heart failure more than likely you have a similar issue and should get checked.

Nope, I never question feelings like that now...


Dave, glad to hear things turned out ok for you...but ignoring chest pains and numbness/tingling are two things I'm sure you won't do again! :eek:

123 Go
02-22-2011, 09:01
Thought I would share some good information to know. My credentials are that I have a B.S. in Kinesiology (think exercise science) and have been a certified personal trainer with N.A.S.M for nearly 7 years.

There is a dramatic increase in hospital visits related to fatal heart attacks
in the winter months. A large percentage of this is directly related to chronic high blood pressure and shoveling snow.

The reason that shoveling snow can elicit heart attacks in those with high blood pressure is because the blood pressure is already elevated prior to shoveling snow. Once a person begins to shovel snow their heart has to work harder to pump blood through the tiny arterioles of the upper limbs, thus increasing the force of blood against arterial walls for sustained periods that are already overloaded with pressure.

So, while this is in regards to shoveling snow, it goes for anything else that requires sustained movements that tax the upper body limbs in a sustained way when a person has chronic high blood pressure.

The end-statement is NOT "don't ever shovel snow," but be well aware of your fitness status, or at the very least blood pressure history. Consider if you have to shovel snow and you do have high blood pressure, then really consider possible limitations and ways to mitigate risk.

Lastly, increasing fitness can reduce blood pressure, normal or compromised. For folks with chronic hypertension - avoid exercises that require repeated upper limb motion (i.e. Use the equipment, but do NOT USE the handles while doing the physical activity on Nordik tracks, elliptical machines, cross-trainers, or versa climbers). Just using your lower body to complete the activity will suffice to improve fitness, reduce blood pressure, decrease your heart rate, and overall reduce your risk for heart related conditions

The same can be said for using resistance (strength) training in those with chronic elevated hypertension. Avoid heavy lifting of the upper body until blood pressure is in good control. Resistance training is a great component - again use caution, consider your personal history and fitness status - lower the weight, go higher rep - until you are in good blood pressure management.

And lastly, to tie this to the original topic, consider those signs if you are participating in shoveling snow or other activities - it can be a warning to take action quickly.

:lifter

swatsurgeon
02-22-2011, 19:53
Thought I would share some good information to know. My credentials are that I have a B.S. in Kinesiology (think exercise science) and have been a certified personal trainer with N.A.S.M for nearly 7 years.

There is a dramatic increase in hospital visits related to fatal heart attacks
in the winter months. A large percentage of this is directly related to chronic high blood pressure and shoveling snow.

The reason that shoveling snow can elicit heart attacks in those with high blood pressure is because the blood pressure is already elevated prior to shoveling snow. Once a person begins to shovel snow their heart has to work harder to pump blood through the tiny arterioles of the upper limbs, thus increasing the force of blood against arterial walls for sustained periods that are already overloaded with pressure.

So, while this is in regards to shoveling snow, it goes for anything else that requires sustained movements that tax the upper body limbs in a sustained way when a person has chronic high blood pressure.

The end-statement is NOT "don't ever shovel snow," but be well aware of your fitness status, or at the very least blood pressure history. Consider if you have to shovel snow and you do have high blood pressure, then really consider possible limitations and ways to mitigate risk.

Lastly, increasing fitness can reduce blood pressure, normal or compromised. For folks with chronic hypertension - avoid exercises that require repeated upper limb motion (i.e. Use the equipment, but do NOT USE the handles while doing the physical activity on Nordik tracks, elliptical machines, cross-trainers, or versa climbers). Just using your lower body to complete the activity will suffice to improve fitness, reduce blood pressure, decrease your heart rate, and overall reduce your risk for heart related conditions

The same can be said for using resistance (strength) training in those with chronic elevated hypertension. Avoid heavy lifting of the upper body until blood pressure is in good control. Resistance training is a great component - again use caution, consider your personal history and fitness status - lower the weight, go higher rep - until you are in good blood pressure management.

And lastly, to tie this to the original topic, consider those signs if you are participating in shoveling snow or other activities - it can be a warning to take action quickly.

:lifter
\

123 go,
No, just STOP. the snow stuff was a post that takes up words and space....if your specialty is a B.S. in Kinesiology and you want to post about resistance training or pose a question related to it relative to the life of an SF'er, and what effects it has on the cardiovascular system, go for it. Leave the snow stuff out of it...let's keep threads on track here for the sake of the military personnel who own/operate/use this site.
Thank you

ss

123 Go
02-22-2011, 21:54
Swatsurgeon,

If I took up extra space and words...apologies. My passion is fitness, health, and integrity of the body... however, will keep that in mind next time I post with my audience. This wasn't to be a controvesial off-topic post.

However, the topic was signs of a stroke and heart attack. My topic was things that will in fact elicit fatal heart attacks (i.e. specifically, intense upper body physical activity). Thus, I believed it noteworthy to mention as we are in February and some of us reside in states with great snow fall. And while it's useful to mention the signs of what a stroke or heart attack might be, I thought if might further be useful to mention what you just might be doing when you experience one.

The Reaper
02-22-2011, 22:00
123, I don't know if you have slowed down long enough to turn your SA on, but swatsurgeon is a Chief of Trauma at a major metro medical center.

There are several other physicians on the forum here, as well as PAs, Nurses, and 18Ds, and since you have not mentioned a medical degree, 18D MOS, or advanced training in those fields, I would recommend that you hold up on the advice outside of the sports medicine, put the shovel down and stop digging your hole.

Most non-SF members here are here to learn, not so much to teach.

Just some friendly advice.

TR

123 Go
02-23-2011, 08:51
you have a PM.
-saca