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crash
09-12-2008, 00:40
http://store.tacsurv.com/ProductDetails.aspx?id=482&prodid=TSS-M-9-ACU

Just picked up one of these, price was to good not to. Been looking for a smaller more streamlined aid bag with out all the feel good and cool guy stuff. Just the basics. Haven't had a chance to really use it yet.

I've heard that the 75th is getting issued these now, but I haven't seen anyone use them before. Only thing similar was the paraclete pack I've seen the D boys with, never seen the inside or how that ones set up though.

Just wondering if anyone out there is using it and how they like it. Also what they carry in it. Been out of the field for a while, think i have all the bases covered but just feel like I'm forgetting something.

Doc Z
09-13-2008, 11:00
Wow! I am amazed at this med pack. We are currently using assault packs with the aid bag side pouches internalized (we blend in with the joes) but this pack could easily slide right under an assault pack without even noticing it is there! (Not to mention it has ACTUAL compartments with easy top access. I don't see a drug sack though, and my browser is having issues seeing the accessories. I would imagine it would be an accessory?

I am definately writing this NSN down. (Cross fingers on the PSG approving the use of food money, or maybe I will foot the bill for my own) ;)

-Doc Z

crash
09-13-2008, 12:19
I haven't really had a chance to use it but I'm impressed so far.

The inside, even the top flap with the loops is all Velcro and everything just hooks in, so you can move stuff around, make your own pouches, ect. There is also a piece that just has molle loops across it with the Velcro so you could attach any pouches you have without modification.

The Reaper
09-13-2008, 20:50
TSSI is a great company, and IIRC, Eagle builds this pack for them, so it should be extremely durable.

The design was supposedly from an 18D.

Very low profile, very nice.

TR

Cass100199
11-23-2008, 09:06
Jut saw this bag last week. It's how I found this site, actually, doing research on it. Got to put my hands on it and whatnot and have to say I'm highly impressed. This is at the top of my Xmas list for the next deployment.

rab97
12-03-2008, 19:30
All the D's in 10th Grp got them. It took awhile, but it happened. I like mine. I also like the TSSI M-5 bag.

lssah2025
12-21-2008, 00:10
Currently looking at the TSSI M9 to replace my current kit bag (for SAR/helo use). Couple of questions for you fine operators that use them now.

1. How is the internal space and set up, user friendly?
2. The lower area has fastex buckles and a zipper, is that another seperate compartment or access to lower internal portion of the bag?
3. Is there enough room or location for a BVM?
4. The molle attachments on the side, is it a single or double width, to accomodate external pouches?
5. From the picture on their website (the area where the laryngo blades and OPA's are) is that a zippered compartment underneath of it?

Any and all info would be appreciated, just hate to order something without getting my damn hands on it or getting the 411 from current users.

__________________________________________________ ________________

"Where the battle rages, there the loyalty of the soldier is proved; and to be steady on all the battlefront besides is merely flight and disgrace if he flinches at that point". Martin Luther

kawika
12-21-2008, 00:32
How is the internal space and set up, user friendly?
It's pretty user friendly but not a whole lot of space. Very limited on what you can carry. If your going to use a setup like this make everyone else carry their blowout stuff, that way you can hold only advanced treatment stuff. Your not going to be shoving kerlex into this thing by any means.
3. Is there enough room or location for a BVM?
Not really unless you sacrifice room for more important stuff. Recommend attatchment to the outside if you do go with this setup

Ill look at it again and post responses to the rest of your questions, thats all I could remember offhand. Nobody in my company uses those bags for medical stuff. They are however the perfect radio bag. Perfect size for a 117 with additional space for handmikes, phone etc.

It's to small to really be of any use, and cumbersome. Your either on a truck and you should pack to the high heavens since you have unlimited space. Or for DA something like a hip belt with pouches attatched to that is much much better. That way you can more easily take it on and off. When its on your hip its way easier to carry than something on your back which you probably already have alot of (camelback in addition to your bodyarmor bulk). We were doing constant helo infils and the belt solution was much better for us, although we had 10k+ movements after the helo infils. If your doing CSAR or just riding on a helicopter you might as well have a big bag that actually has space for things you need. This bag just doesn't have enough of it unless you defeat the purpose of it by placing like 5 pouches at least on the outside.

Oh and I forgot, if you do go with this bag change out the straps. They are really thin and will cut into your shoulders about 0.5 seconds into movement. We took straps off whatever random blackhawk bags we had laying around and had riggers sew them on.

Surgicalcric
12-21-2008, 12:24
1.) It is fairly user friendly but prioritizing equipment is a must (knowing the mission requirements and being able to pack within that constraint.) As kawika points out, you wont be stuffing kerlix or anything else into this pack in an orderly fashion.

2.) Yes.

3.) The space in the bottom will fit a BVM though it wasn't intended for that purpose; it is for a poleless litter.

4.) The PALS is single channel. My personal feelings are that if you find yourself adding pouches to this pack then you are over-extending it and as such should find something else.

5.) It is a velcro panel thats removable.

Guys, the M9 bag was designed to fit a certain mission requirement for a certain group of guys. Keeping this in mind it is a good bag, however it is not a bag that will fit the multi-mission role very well.

OOMV but thats my .02.


Crip

Aequitas
12-21-2008, 13:31
lssah2025: We are SF medics; not operators. ;)

1.) It is fairly user friendly but prioritizing equipment is a must (knowing the mission requirements and being able to pack within that constraint.) As kawika points out, you wont be stuffing kerlix or anything else into this pack in an orderly fashion.

2.) Yes.

3.) The space in the bottom will fit a BVM though it wasn't intended for that purpose. It is for a poleless litter

4.) It is single channel. My personal feelings are that if you find yourself adding pouches to this pack then you are over-extending it.

5.) It is a velcro panel thats removable

Guys, the M9 bag was designed to fit a certain mission requirement for a certain group of guys. Keeping this in mind it is a good bag, however it is not a bag that will fit the multi-mission role very well.

OOMV but thats my .02.


Crip

I'll agree with the above posts and Crips, but I have some of my own input on the use of this bag...

1) I'm on DA team...both medics use this particular bag for our hits; however, we also keep larger bags available either with a terp, vehicle, etc...

2) yes.

3) The bottom zipper portion is where we keep the p-less litter and IVs kits. I agree there is enough room for bvm, but you can fit that bad boy in the inner area. We usually role with 2 1L Iv kits in that bottom pouch though. BVMs are pretty prone to abuse and being condensed down to fit in small places.

4) As far as attachments just be careful...too much shit added on and you're only weighing yourself down and increasing your physical size and stature considerably. The only attachments I added were grenade, flashbang, and smokes across the top for guys in the stack to grab when needed. I also threw on some chem lights and TQs. Chem lights for cleared areas, signals, etc...TQs well you can never have enough of them.

5) The straps were annoying, but that's easily fixed when you attach the fastex clips to your kit and use the waist strap in addition. As far as the inside goes...it's user friendly and medic's choice. There are 4 strips in there that can be removed to hold various items. I chose to remove one of those to leave more room for the pouch contents.

Personally I've used this bag on every hit. It's comfortable once you fastex it to your kit which keeps the weight off your shoulders and once you know the inside it's very easy to work out of. I've moved distances varying from 100m to 3k with it on my back in route to the OBJ. I've also climbed all over the freaking mountains with it on and climbed all over buildings, walls, corn fields, etc.

Choosing your aid bag is like anything else...sights, gloves, boots etc...it's your personal preference. Good luck on the hunt. Hope this helps some with your search. Let me know if you have any other questions.

**Forgot to mention** Our 18Es and CCTs liked this bag so much they stole three of our extras and modified them a little bit. Turns out that if you rip out all the velcro pieces and cut a small hole in the top of the bag....this thing will easily hold a radio and a few other various items. It fits perfectly. The 18Es also liked having the ability to fastex this thing on their kit b/c the weight of the radio was pulling their regular bag straps into their shoulders. They would run the cable out the bottom zipper from the inside to outside and attach the antenna onto the bag with zip ties where the molle attachment points are at. The X-wing actually fits without pushing over the top of the bag or sticking to far off the bag and body. This helped the 18Es streamline themselves a little bit better.

lssah2025
12-22-2008, 12:51
Gentlemen, thank you for you insight and wisdom on this specific bag. It looks like I am going to give this a try, due to its size and because it is ultra user friendly. If it doesn't work out, then I guess I will have a great extra pack to mess with.

Aequitas: Sorry if I offended you in any way on the "operator", I just figured that there were more medical professionals on here and figured that would be a good blanket "word" to cover all. ;)

Thanks again...



"Where the battle rages, there the loyalty of the soldier is proved; and to be steady on all the battlefront besides is merely flight and disgrace if he flinches at that point". Martin Luther

Calrngr
01-06-2009, 04:36
Just my .02cents.

I (and most of the medics in my Company) run with an M9 bag & the TT First Responder Bag.

The TT carries quickly accessible trauma gear. And the M9 carries intervention stuff (chest tube, Fluids, more bandages etc).

As for the BVM. I was recommended to carry a ped BVM, because it is pretty hard to bag down an adult w/a ped BVM.

crash
02-14-2009, 00:20
3) The bottom zipper portion is where we keep the p-less litter and IVs kits. I agree there is enough room for bvm, but you can fit that bad boy in the inner area. We usually role with 2 1L Iv kits in that bottom pouch though. BVMs are pretty prone to abuse and being condensed down to fit in small places.

**Forgot to mention** Our 18Es and CCTs liked this bag so much they stole three of our extras and modified them a little bit. Turns out that if you rip out all the velcro pieces and cut a small hole in the top of the bag....this thing will easily hold a radio and a few other various items. It fits perfectly. The 18Es also liked having the ability to fastex this thing on their kit b/c the weight of the radio was pulling their regular bag straps into their shoulders. They would run the cable out the bottom zipper from the inside to outside and attach the antenna onto the bag with zip ties where the molle attachment points are at. The X-wing actually fits without pushing over the top of the bag or sticking to far off the bag and body. This helped the 18Es streamline themselves a little bit better.

What are you using for a BVM and Pole less litter?
The pole less litter we have is basically the same as a talon little just with no pole and hand loops. Not that compact or easy to fold. I keep a few sam splints and iv kits (hespan) in the bottom pouch. not much room for my litter even with out the splints.

If you wouldn't mind I'd like to see a pic of how your 18E used the pack, I can imagine it, but seeing is always better.


I still love this pack, and some of the contractors I've worked with loved mine so much they all ordered them; another one of my guys acquired one -hopefully not from one of the contractors. :cool:

I even learned a few tricks from them; the best trick had nothing to do with the bag, other than it was in his kit. He made a chest seal using... -I just forgot what its called, used for attaching demo to doors and what not... anyway he cut the valve off a asherman and made his own out of this stuff because it sticks to anything..? Wouldn't mind getting my hands on some of that and trying it out.


Has anyone use paracletes aid bag? Very similar to this one, I saw one once not sure if they where but he said he loved it for basically the same reasons as the m-9 bag, but the situation didn't allow for him to show me how it was set up, so I've never seen the inside, or even been ale to find pics of the inside....

Surgicalcric
02-14-2009, 08:32
...Has anyone use paracletes aid bag? Very similar to this one, I saw one once not sure if they where but he said he loved it for basically the same reasons as the m-9 bag, but the situation didn't allow for him to show me how it was set up, so I've never seen the inside, or even been ale to find pics of the inside....


I havent used one, only because I havent been able to talk Josh or Eric into letting me leave their store with it but I like the mesh pockets. Unless they have found someone to take it off their hands they have one at Grey Group on N Reilly.

Crip

crash
02-14-2009, 11:07
double post...

crash
02-14-2009, 11:08
Ah, cool thanks for the pic; all I could ever find where pics of the outside, or super small inside photos.

How deep are the two back pouches? Is the interiour pouches all velcro like the M-9?

I'd love to be able to run over the Grey Group and take a look, but maybe on R&R. Paraclete makes nice stuff, not to sure about the $ on this though, a little steep. Then again it would probably out live me...:boohoo

18C4V
02-14-2009, 11:19
Our SF medics used the M9 medical bags in OIF and loved them. Based upon that, I ordered two for my SWAT Team.

justanotherdude
02-18-2009, 01:40
Just my .02cents.

I (and most of the medics in my Company) run with an M9 bag & the TT First Responder Bag.



Are you wearing the TT FRB around the waist or strapped on top of the M9? I'd be interested to hear more about this setup and what you are packing in each bag.

I had 5 of them, they just showed up at one point :). I was a bit dissapointed, even after packing them a few ways (*extremely* small cubes, very mission specific, perhaps iso 2-4 guys). If you were to carry the TSSI M9 for general purpose (which it was never designed for), it'd be a terrible choice. You'd need A) the guys you're supporting to carry a fat ass IFAK and you purely carry ADVANCED tactical field care items in the M9 B) another bag or pouches on it C) medevac overhead D) the truck right outside with your serious kit in it. Even then, it's not for most. Without overloading yourself, the larger your bag is the more you can handle the full spectrum of pre-hospital treatment. For me the common sense test is "why not just carry my eagle A-III?"

From smallest to largest my aidbags are; the TT FRB for a 1st line bag (also clips to the top or back of an assault pack), the TSSI M4 small but surprisingly roomy (can be worn on the hips, fastex'ed or shoulder strapped, even dropped in a large assault pack like the Eagle Airborne Large), the TT M5/Eagle A-III Medical (clipped to the top of a ruck), and the Blackhawk STOMP2/LBT Training & Coverage (platform bag).

I feel that I can get done 90% of what anyone asks me to do with the Eagle A-III medical, depending how I pack it. I keep it loaded on the heavy side, if I feel like it's too heavy it takes all of 5 minutes to lighten it up. I take things out in multiples. I.e., ace and gauze come out in pairs, a TQ for every 2 ace/gauze but never less than 3, I would drop 1 of the hespan kits, et al. You can take a bag like the eagle, pack it with the same packing list as the M9, cinch it down and voila, almost as small. But at the same time you can go big with it.

I make it a rule to wear the TT FRB as often as I can, even when in vehicles (just takes some getting used to). I like the piece of mind that I will always have the basics on my body, to buy time for the cax until evacuation or I can get to my more capable bags.

All in all I look at my bag like a list of capabilities. Whatever capability I don't have I am relying on evacuation to treat. The capability I don't have best not kill my cax (or cause irreversible death) within however long it takes to get them evacuated. Before the mission you should have your PACE. E. g., Primary - Air Medeva,c Alternate - Air Casevac, Contigency - Ground Casevac, Emergency Ground Medevac. A then you tack a worst case scenario time to each option. After that I do a quick review of my "capabilities" to see if what I'm carrying supports all those things in addition to the medical threat, enemy weapons, METT-TC, et al.

No hijack intended. I know I'm preaching to the choir. Just my .02.

Dan

doc_robalt
05-05-2010, 05:36
I've been running with the M9 Bag now for most of my deployment here in Afghanistan, but found one major problem. That is the lack of capability it has with a camelbak or any other type of hydration bladder. Ive tried attaching it directly to the bag, but when I do that it makes the bag a little on the heavy side especially when using the clips and it also impedes the ability to fully open the bag. I've also tried wearing the bag over a camelbak but that just seems to make it cumbersome. I think the best solution I can come up with is to jerry rig a make shift BVS system like the ones they have on Mystery Ranch packs, unfortunately the company will not alter bags they didn't make. If anyone else can come up with a more sensible solution I would really appreciate it. Thanks

The Reaper
05-05-2010, 07:34
Doc:

This is not where your first post should be.

Please review the rules and stickies and comply before posting further, and fill in your profile.

TR

crash
05-05-2010, 08:35
. If anyone else can come up with a more sensible solution I would really appreciate it. Thanks

First- listen to TR fill in your profile, post a intro, or you won't be welcome here long...

This is a good bag for certain things, its comfortable without body armor and very compact. I'm actually using mine for a wilderness EMT course now, but if your on extended patrols or if you using and camelbak, or patrol pack or are wearing a ruck it becomes very cumbersome and heavy especially with as little as two IV bags over time it feels like a bag of bricks, not to mention if your already carrying an assault pack.

This bag really was intended more as a Direct Action Oh' sh!t bag, not a carry everyday on patrols type bag.

What types of missions are you doing what kind of gear are you carrying, injuries your seeing? I can give you some suggestions on packs that might work for you.

doc_robalt
05-10-2010, 22:19
First- listen to TR fill in your profile, post a intro, or you won't be welcome here long...

This is a good bag for certain things, its comfortable without body armor and very compact. I'm actually using mine for a wilderness EMT course now, but if your on extended patrols or if you using and camelbak, or patrol pack or are wearing a ruck it becomes very cumbersome and heavy especially with as little as two IV bags over time it feels like a bag of bricks, not to mention if your already carrying an assault pack.

This bag really was intended more as a Direct Action Oh' sh!t bag, not a carry everyday on patrols type bag.

What types of missions are you doing what kind of gear are you carrying, injuries your seeing? I can give you some suggestions on packs that might work for you.


Well we've been issued these bags as our primary Aidbags to take on patrol as an effort to reduce the weight we are carrying on patrol, since we do dismounted patrols in the mountains of Afghanistan from elevations of 3000ft up to 5000ft +, and distances of 5k or more usually round trip. We were issued Eagle Industries Plate Carriers, and I carry a standard combat load with a few pouches of medical equipment to treat on the spot trauma. As far as what I carry in my M9 I usually have 1-2 Cric Kits, 1 King LT, 2 Saline Lock Kits, about 4 Combat Gauze Packs, 4 Packs of Kerlex, 4 Ace Wraps or NAR ETD, 1 Abdominal Dressing, 4 Chest Seals- either Hyfins, or some HydroGel, I have 2 14G Needles, some cravats, 2in Tape, 2 Sam Splints, and 2 Bags of Hextend with IV Kits attached. I sometimes adjust what I carry and add to it depending on the mission, like one mission due to the possibility of delayed medevac I stuffed a Chest tube kit in my bag. I pretty much went off of the Ranger Medic Handbook as far as my standard load out of medical equipment to carry and adjusted from there. Like I said the issue isn't usually the weight, its the issue of making it work with Camelbak. Any help you can give will be appreciated Thanks.

JMonty
05-11-2010, 01:40
My unit uses the Ranger Medic Handbook as a guide in terms of minimum stockage and mission dependent equipment. It's in the works, but what we want to do is basically have different bags and their medical inserts (with specific supplies or equipment such as Meds, or a chest tube kit) that can be mixed and matched for a variety of missions.
Currently, I have a TT First Responder bag that has CUF supplies and some TFC airway devices. Our PA is has just ordered some NAR CCRKs which is almost the exact same as the TT FR but has a MOLLE system on the back of it with two of the plastic buckles. Additionally the place for the scissors was moved to the front of the bag instead of on top (the insides of both bags are the same).
Now, we have the M-9 Aid Bags on order but it's my understanding that being a smaller bag that can't carry as much, the M-9 is used primarily as a DA/ short distance aid bag. We also have the BH STOMP IIs but they stay in the trucks unless we're moving a great distance that would make it necessary to take them with us.
Also, we're working on getting a CUF pouch that can either go on our chest or our thigh (medic's choice) so we don't have to constantly run around with our big BlackHawk bags (I purchased my own CUF pouch and TT FR bag before this deployment).
For those of you that have problems with fitting a BVM in your bag, we use the NAR CYCLONE bvm which comes in a vacum sealed bag not much bigger than one of the NAR abdominal dressings (remind me to buy some stock in these guys).
That's all I have.

crash
05-11-2010, 08:26
Like I said the issue isn't usually the weight, its the issue of making it work with Camelbak. Any help you can give will be appreciated Thanks.

Use canteens.

OR

Get something like this and mount it to the molle panel on the back of the m-9.
http://camelbak.com/government-military/hydration-packs/armorbak.aspx